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What is the best mask for COVID-19? A mechanical engineer explains.

By Christian L'Orange

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has changed its guidelines about masks and respirators a number of times over the past two years and gave its most recent update on Jan. 14, 2022. The update states that cloth...

Should new Australians have to pass an English test to become citizens?

By Matteo Bonotti

On Australia Day each year, thousands of people become Australian citizens at ceremonies around the country. Prospective citizens have to meet a number of eligibility criteria, including passing a citizenship test to...

Some endangered species can no longer survive in the wild. So should we alter their genes?

By Tiffany Kosch

Around the world, populations of many beloved species are declining at increasing rates. According to one grim projection, as many as 40% of the worlds species may be extinct by 2050. Alarmingly, many of these declines are...

Cracking joints isn't bad for you and could even serve a useful purpose

By Neil Tuttle

Some people habitually crack their joints, others cant, and many are irritated by those who do. So whats going on? Why do people do it, is it harmful, what makes the noises, and what would happen if our joints werent...

Nova Scotia’s shift to publicly funded early learning and child care won’t be easy, but it’s critical

By Christine McLean Et Al

On Jan. 14, as part of the Canada-wide early learning and child care agreement, Nova Scotia announced a reduction in child-care fees by 25 per cent retroactive from Jan. 1, 2022 and other related changes that are part of a...

Burkina Faso coup: latest sign of a rise in the ballot box being traded for bullets

By Jonathan Powell

When news broke that soldiers had mutinied in Burkina Faso, it was hardly surprising. Burkina Fasos history has been plagued by both army mutinies and military coups détat. Earlier this year an attempt was...

From sanctioning a refugee team to letting China host: Does the International Olympic Committee support human rights?

By MacIntosh Ross Et Al

The International Olympic Committees (IOC) position on refugees is contradictory and confusing. The organization has its own Refugee Team competing at the 2022 Beijing Olympics. Its a relatively new initiative,...

Cannabis: increased schizophrenia risk in young people linked to both low and high use

By Ian Hamilton Et Al

An estimated 200 million people use cannabis across the world. Next to alcohol and tobacco, its the most widely used drug in many countries. But while many may no longer see cannabis as a risky or harmful substance, there...

The policing bill will criminalise Gypsy and Traveller families - but there is a solution

By Samuel Burgum Et Al

The policing bill making its way through UK parliament has sparked controversy over its draconian proposals to expand police powers and curb protests. The bill will also have a detrimental impact on Gypsy and Traveller...

Jane Eyre – content warnings are as old as the novel itself

By Jo Waugh

Read Jane Eyre if you dare warned papers recently. The Daily Mail had sent a request for information to Salford University and subsequently claimed that the institution had issued trigger warnings on a literature module...

The NHS is having its worst winter ever – and the reasons run much deeper than COVID

By Peter Sivey

The NHS is going through the worst winter crisis since records began, with waiting times for ambulances, in AE departments and for elective surgery all longer than ever, leaving thousands of patients suffering in pain and...

What is 5G? An electrical engineer explains

By Prasenjit Mitra

5G stands for fifth-generation cellular network technology. Its the technology that enables wireless communication for example, from your cellular phone to a cell tower, which channels it to the internet. 5G is a...

T-cells: the superheroes in the battle against omicron

By Luke O'Neill

Omicron is spreading rapidly throughout the world, with experts claiming that 40% of the global population will be infected within the next two months. This sounds quite startling, but we still dont really know whether...

Supermarket shortages are different this time: how to respond and avoid panic

By Flavio Macau

Australia has experienced plenty of supermarket shortages since the COVID pandemic began. The emerging crisis now is a bit different. In 2020 and 2021, empty shelves were due to spikes in demand, as shoppers responded...

How extremists have used the COVID pandemic to further their own ends, often with chaotic results

By Kristy Campion

Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, extremists have sought to exploit the pandemic environment to their own ends. Where most of the population sees an enduring health catastrophe, extremists tend to see opportunity. Over...

How Covid broke supply chains, and how AI and blockchain could fix them

By Andreea Minca

When the coronavirus crisis erupted in 2020, it became apparent that the medical emergency was accompanied by severe shortages, especially in some medical devices. The pattern was first observed for ventilators: demand...

How social media can crush your self-esteem

By Sabrina Laplante

We all have a natural tendency to compare ourselves to others, whether intentionally or not, online or offline. Such comparisons help us evaluate our own achievements, skills, personality and our emotions. This, in turn,...

Feeling powerless in the COVID-19 pandemic? 4 principles of self-determination can help you take back some control

By Kate Mulligan

The Omicron wave seemed to come like a rising tide slowly, then suddenly, in all directions and all at once. Inside the health-care system, skeleton crews face impossible workloads and moral distress. Outside of it,...

Omicron: Vaccines remain the best defence against this COVID-19 variant and others

By Julian Daniel Sunday Willett

We have made it through another pandemic winter holiday. Fortunately, COVID-19 fatalities have decreased since the year before, however, the numbers still werent ideal. Using Dec. 25 as a reference date, the death rate...

The U.S. failed in Afghanistan by trying to moralize with bullets and bombs

By F. Haider Alvi

Last August, the world watched the chaotic and painful American departure from Afghanistan. It led to a profound reckoning: how could two decades of war end in such humiliating defeat at the hands of Taliban...

Supreme Court considers derailing federal vaccine mandates

By James Hodge1

Conservative justices on the Supreme Court appeared to signal a belief that the Biden administration may have overreached in ordering private companies to require that staff be vaccinated or subject to regular testing. But...

In Kazakhstan, Russia follows a playbook it developed in Ukraine

By Lena Surzhko Harned

Add Kazakhstan to the list of former Soviet republics whose independence is now being threatened by Russia. Russian leader Vladimir Putin is using a similar playbook in Kazakhstan to one that he has used over almost a...

Supply chains in 2022: shortages will continue, but for some sellers the problem will be too much stock

By Sarah Schiffling

Everything was about shortages in 2021. COVID vaccine shortages at the start of the year were replaced by fears that we would struggle to buy turkeys, toys or electronic gizmos to put under the Christmas tree. For most of...

Sydney's dams may be almost full – but don't relax, because drought will come again

By Ian Wright

Dams serving capital cities such as Canberra, Hobart and Sydney are near full after two years of widespread rainfall. But these wet conditions wont last. Under climate change, droughts in Australia will become more...

Capitol assault: the real reason Trump and the crowd almost killed US democracy

By Stephen Reicher Et Al

It was the moment that could have brought US democracy to its knees. One year ago, around noon on January 6, 2021, Donald Trump gave the concluding speech to a Stop the Steal rally in Washington DC. Within an hour,...

A simple calculation can stop artificial intelligence sending you broke

By Evan Shellshear Et Al

Mike is a 40-something crop farmer from southern Queensland. With a chestnut tan, crushing handshake and a strong outback accent, hes the third generation of his family to grow sorghum, a cereal mostly used for animal...

From speed viewing to watching the end first: how streaming has changed the way we consume TV

By Stephanie Feiereisen Et Al

In 2010, there were around 200 television programs in the United States and only 4% of them aired on streaming networks such as Netflix. By 2020, this number had more than doubled. Thanks to streaming platforms such as...

Insurance isn't enough: Governments need to do better on natural disaster resilience

By Anne E. Kleffner Et Al

The massive floods in British Columbia in November 2021 demonstrated the devastation that natural disasters can cause in Canada. Prior to 2010, it was rare for annual insured losses from natural disasters in Canada to...

Working holidaymakers bring in $3bn each year – so, how will Australia ensure they come back?

By Sarah Gardiner

Working holidaymakers will be one of the first international visitor markets to return to Australia in 2022. But as global travel slowly resumes and many young people start thinking about working overseas again, global...

This New Year, why not resolve to ditch your dodgy old passwords?

By Paul Haskell-Dowland Et Al

Most of the classic New Year resolutions revolve around improving your health and lifestyle. But this year, why not consider cleaning up your passwords too? We all know the habits to avoid, yet so many of us do them...

Plant-based doesn’t always mean healthy

By Meghan McGee

As we ring in the new year and people announce their resolutions and goals for 2022, many opt for getting healthy, cutting out drinking or starting a new hobby. Vegan magazines and organizations are pushing plant-based...

Here are some of the political events that will dominate headlines in 2022

By Thomas Klassen

Last year started out hopeful with the emergence of COVID-19 vaccines, but quickly proved to be a challenging year for governments and communities worldwide. Still, in the midst of the pandemic, 2022 will bring about a...

AI-powered chatbots, designed ethically, can support high-quality university teaching

By Nadia Naffi Et Al

While COVID-19 forced an emergency transformation to online learning at universities, learning how to teach efficiently and effectively online using different platforms and tools is a positive addition to education and is...

Life after COVID: most people don't want a return to normal – they want a fairer, more sustainable future

By Stephan Lewandowsky Et Al

We are in a crisis now and omicron has made it harder to imagine the pandemic ending. But it will not last forever. When the COVID outbreak is over, what do we want the world to look like? In the early stages of the...

How COVID-19 transformed genomics and changed the handling of disease outbreaks forever

By Angela Beckett Et Al

If the pandemic had happened ten years ago, what would it have looked like? Doubtless there would have been many differences, but probably the most striking would have been the relative lack of genomic sequencing. This is...

New Year's resolutions – if the future is preordained can we really change?

By Matyáš Moravec

Many of us set ourselves New Years resolutions hoping to form better habits. Some of us might want to be more environmentally friendly. Others want to eat better, stop smoking or, if youre like me, start running more...

Weightlifting: how beginners can get started this new year

By Athalie Redwood-Brown Et Al

Weightlifting has become increasingly popular with people looking to get in shape. Not only can it be a great way to lose weight, it can also build strength and prevent muscle loss as we age. But knowing how to start...

Six big digital trends to watch in 2022

By Theo Tzanidis

According to recent McKinsey research, 2021 was a year of transformation: people, corporations and society began to look ahead to influencing their futures rather than just surviving the present. It was the year that...

Is The Matrix a trans film? Revisiting the Wachowskis through a trans lens

By Naja Later

With Lana Wachowskis The Matrix Resurrections about to hit theatres, were going to see a lot of criticism interpreting siblings Lana and Lilly Wachowskis body of films through a trans lens. Im really looking forward to it:...

Nature's GPS: how animals use the natural world to perform extraordinary feats of navigation

By Richard Holland

At Christmas, thousands of greetings cards feature the iconic winter plumage of the robin. But not all the robins you might find in your backyard are permanent natives to your country. In the UK, for example, some will...

Ghislaine Maxwell guilty in Epstein sex trafficking case: What the case revealed about female sex offenders

By Poco Kernsmith Et Al

British socialite Ghislaine Maxwell has been convicted for her role in luring and grooming girls to be sexually abused by the American financier Jeffrey Epstein. In a court in lower Manhattan, Maxwell a close friend of...

Why COVID-19 means the era of ever cheaper air travel could be over

By David Beirman

After its worst two years since the second world war, 2022 is looking brighter for the global airline industry. For passengers, though, the chance to travel at low cost again may prove short-lived. In 2020 international...

How a handful of prehistoric geniuses launched humanity's technological revolution

By Nicholas R. Longrich

For the first few million years of human evolution, technologies changed slowly. Some three million years ago, our ancestors were making chipped stone flakes and crude choppers. Two million years ago, hand-axes. A million...

Explainer: what is corporate social responsibility or CSR – and what do investors need to know?

By Limin Fu

With the world facing an ever-growing number of environmental and social challenges, investors are increasingly expecting corporations to do the right thing and contribute positively to the community. This is known as...

When should you go to hospital for a headache?

By Natasha Yates

I waited for hours in emergency last night with this dreadful headache, but eventually gave up and left. Should I have kept waiting at the hospital? This is a surprisingly common scenario I encounter as a general...

Five ways the internet era has changed British English – new research

By Vaclav Brezina

The dramatic changes in technology over the past 20 or so years, from the internet to the smartphone and digital assistants like Alexa, have made communication more accessible than ever before. We have created an online...

Beyond Sherlock Holmes: five Victorian detective stories you must read

By Clare Clarke

In December 1893, just six years after his first appearance and at the height of his popularity with the late-Victorian reading public, Sherlock Holmes, the worlds most famous fictional detective, was killed off by his...

Can China win back global opinion before the Winter Olympics? Does it even want to?

By Jennifer Y.J. Hsu

The Beijing Winter Olympics are only weeks away and China has been forced on the defensive by a diplomatic boycott called by the US, UK, Australia and other western countries. There had been pressure for Western...

How 2021 was the year governments really started to wise up against big tech

By David Tuffley

After all the bad press tech companies have received, would anyone still be surprised to learn the outwardly smiling face of social media conceals a sophisticated data-collection industry? This years headlines delivered...

Running out of ideas? Dozing off could be the secret to unlocking your creativity

By Delphine Oudiette Et Al

At the fringe between wakefulness and sleep, there is a grey zone where our consciousness fluctuates, our responsiveness decreases and our awareness of the real world starts to dissolve, giving way to spontaneous...

A decade later, no end in sight for Libya’s political transition

Two days before Libyans were to go to the ballots for a new interim president on December 24, the countrys election officials finally admitted what had become obvious: the first-round vote would not take place. Citing...

Kenya Airways is in financial trouble (again). Why national carriers have a hard time

By Dawna Rhoades - 04:38 AM| Economy Business

Jomo Kenyatta International Airport in Nairobi, Kenya, offers flights to over 56 destinations in 39 countries. This should be a remarkable feat in these waning days of the COVID-19 global pandemic. Standing out among...

Climate Change Series

US tax credits for wind and solar mostly benefit big banks

By Sarah Knuth - 04:49 AM| Insights & Views Economy

How can countries build renewable energy at the scale and rate needed to prevent dangerous climate change? The plan so far has been to try and make the cost of generating electricity from renewable sources cheap enough to...

S. Korea’s borrowing restrictions and higher interest rates increases number of buildings sold at court auctions

23:40 PM| Economy Business Law

The number of buildings in South Korea put up for court auction has increased since October of last year following the governments introduction of stricter regulations for loans and higher interest rates. The number of...

Top Stories

Could 5G really ground planes?

By Sufian Yousef - 04:41 AM| Technology

Why the US has delayed rolling out the mobile internet technology around airports

Global Geopolitics Series

Ukraine crisis is reminding Nato why it was formed in the first place

By Mark Webber - 04:39 AM| Politics

As Russian troops mobilise near Ukraines border and appear poised to invade, so the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation (Nato) has assumed its traditional role as a bastion of European defence. That mission the one for...

Conservatives in crisis: where whipping stops and blackmail begins

By Thomas Caygill - 04:43 AM| Politics

Whips are key players in Westminster. They act as a two-way channel of communication between the party leadership and backbench MPs, feeding information from the leadership to MPs and vice versa. If the leadership wants...

Econotimes Series

Economy

Marc Jacobs handed out free $300 bags due to online glitch

Marc Jacobs is one of the well-known luxury brands in the world, and recently, it has given away free bags worth $300 each to shoppers who are buying online. Buyers were surprised to find they were given a 100% discount...

McDonald’s misses earnings estimates due to rising costs, pandemic woes

McDonalds fell short of its revenue, and profit estimates, and the company cited rising costs and low sales turnout in its more than 4,500 store outlets in China and Australia. It said that the issues brought by the...

Nike appoints Ann Miller as new executive vice president

Nike, the American footwear and sports apparel company, announced it had promoted Ann Miller to be its new executive vice president and general counsel. Her assignment is set to take effect on Feb. 17. Portland Business...

S. Korea’s Largest Solar Farm Begins Operations

South Koreas largest solar power plant that covers an area of 1.42 million square meters, encompassing four towns in the southwestern county of Shinan has begun operations. The solar farm, which holds a capacity of 150...

S. Korean institute develops chimney smoke fine dust filtration system

The Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials had developed a system that filters fine dust in the white smoke emitted from thermoelectric power plants and waste incinerating facilities through simultaneous cooling and...

Politics

Mike Pence 'actively sabotaged' fake electors scheme

Now-former vice president Mike Pence was targeted by the pro-Trump mob during the January 6 Capitol insurrection. According to a White House reporter, Pence did more than refuse to overturn election results. S.V. Date...

Donald Trump 'strong-armed' the RNC into paying his legal fees

Former President Donald Trump is facing several lawsuits and investigations, a few of which were related to the 2020 elections and his efforts to overturn the election results. Attorney Tristan Snell explained how Trumps...

Mark Meadows aide testified before Jan. 6 committee

The congressional committee investigating the January 6 Capitol insurrection is steadily making more and more progress into piecing together the events that took place. Another development to the panels probe is that they...

Kamala Harris to play important role in selecting new SCOTUS justice

Speculations have now begun as to who US President Joe Biden will be nominating as the next Supreme Court justice. Vice President Kamala Harris is set to play a key role in the selection of the next justice of the high...

Joe Biden, Drew Barrymore, others to honor Betty White in tv special

US President Joe Biden will take part in a television special honoring actress and comedienne Betty White, who passed away in December. Biden will be alongside many other celebrity guests in the special that is set to air...

Science

Hyundai Steel develops high crack resistance steel plates for EVs

Hyundai Steel Co. had developed a premium 1.5GPa martensitic (MS) steel plate for eco-friendly vehicles, which has a higher crack resistance than any other in the same product category. South Koreas No. 2 steelmaker...

Japanese lunar exploration firm Ispace plans first moon landing by private firm

Ispace Inc. will execute the worlds first moon landing by a private company through its unmanned lunar lander, which will be launched by the end of this year from the US. It will carry lunar probes developed separately...

SK Chemicals to ramp up production of chemically-recycled PET for food containers

SK Chemicals Co. has ramped up its production of chemically-recycled (CR) PET for the food container market, made by chemically decomposing waste plastics to turn them into pure raw materials and then used for...

S. Korean researchers develop portable ‘electronic nose that checks meat freschness

The Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology developed a portable electronic nose that can check in real-time whether meat has spoiled. The research team developed the electronic nose by creating two...

S. Korean scientists develop protein absorbent that collects rare earth elements from steel slag

A Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology research team has developed a protein absorbent that can collect rare earth elements from steel slag, an industrial by-product. The research team succeeded in selectively...

Technology

Samsung Galaxy S22 models technical specs have leaked ahead of their February launch

There is still more than a week left before the official launch of the Samsung Galaxy S22 series. But, thanks to reliable leak sources, tech fans do not have to wait to know almost all the technical specifications of the...

OnePlus Nord CE 2 5G will reportedly launch on February 11

It now looks like February is going to be a huge month for people looking to upgrade to a new mid-range phone as well. A recent leak suggests the OnePlus Nord CE 2 5G could be announced in February. To recap, the first...

‘Death Stranding’ PC gamers will only pay $10 for the Director’s Cut upgrade

PC gamers finally have a release date for the Death Stranding: Directors Cut on Steam, and it is happening quite soon. Another good news is that players who have already purchased the base game do not have to buy the...

‘Hyper Scape’ servers to shut down on April 28

Ubisoft announced on Thursday that it would stop the development of Hyper Scape in the coming months. That also means its servers will be shut down soon, leaving its loyal fans only a few months left to keep playing the...

Epic Games Store will continue offering weekly free games in 2022

Epic Games Store users will continue getting one of the best deals throughout 2022 as Epic Games announced that the weekly free game giveaways will still be available on its digital storefront. Players have also been...
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