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Tracy Halcomb

Professor of Communication, Flagler College
Professor Halcomb earned her Ph.D. in Mass Communication Law & Policy from Bowling Green State University, where her dissertation assessed Action for Children’s Television and the FCC. She earned an M.A. in Mass Communication from Bowling Green University and a B.S. in Mass Communication from Miami University. Her areas of specialization and research include new media regulation; mass communication law and ethics; international broadcasting; and children and the media.

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Tracy Langkilde

Professor of Biology and Verne M. Willaman Dean, Eberly College of Science, Penn State
My lab works at the interface of ecology and evolution to understand how an organism's traits are matched to its environment and responds to novel selective pressures imposed by global environmental change, and the consequences of this adaptation. Our research takes an integrative approach, applying behavioral observations, endocrine assays, morphological analysis tools, and molecular approaches to both field and laboratory studies, with a focus on reptiles and amphibians. This work has both basic and applied importance, informing the role of evolutionary processes in assembly and dynamics of natural communities, and our understanding of the resilience and responses of native populations to rapid perturbations caused by global environmental change.

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Tracy Logan

Assistant Professor, University of Canberra
Tracy is a qualified primary school teacher, who has previously lectured to undergraduate pre-service teachers in the discipline of mathematics education. As an early career academic, most of Tracy's research has emerged from involvement in five ARC Discovery grants. Her areas of strength reside within student's spatial reasoning, mathematics assessment and the use of digital tools for mathematics sense making. Tracy's research involves a range of mixed-paradigm research methodologies, including data collection in longitudinal mass-testing situations; one-on-one interviews; cross-country comparisons of students' numeracy development; student and teacher focus groups; longitudinal case studies; and stimulated recall.Her industry involvement has included research projects with the Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA) and the World Bank (Indonesia).

Tracy is currently undertaking a PhD at the University of Canberra in the area of mathematics education, with a focus on secondary data analysis utilising a sophisticated framework that analyses both quantitative and qualitative data. Her Master's thesis at Queensland University of Technology was awarded dissertation of the year.

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Tracy Molloy

Senior Lecturer in Sport Governance, Law & Ethics, Auckland University of Technology
Tracy Molloy has a background in sports law and sports governance (at national and international levels). She is currently a member of AUT's Sport Leadership & Management (SLAM) Department and the Sport Performance Research Institute of NZ (SPRINZ). She teaches Law & Ethics for Sport & Recreation and Advanced Sport Leadership & Management. Her research interests and supervisions include sport governance, leadership and sport integrity.

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Tracy Taylor

Adjunct professor of sports management, Victoria University
Tracy is an internationally recognised sport management scholar, with 150+ peer reviewed journal publications, books, book chapters and research project reports. Tracy has been awarded over $3m in research grants and has led a number research projects nationally and internationally, and contributed to research projects from across Australia, Canada and Europe.

Tracy's current research areas cover women's professional team sport, gender equality, leadership and culture, and diversity and inclusion.

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Trana Hussaini

Clinical associate professor, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of British Columbia
Dr. Hussaini is a clinical pharmacy specialist in liver transplantation at Vancouver General Hospital and a clinical associate professor at the University of British Columbia, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences. She also holds a Masters degree in Health Sciences. Her areas of expertise and research interests include drug-induced liver injury, viral hepatitis and immunosuppressive pharmacotherapy.

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Trang Thi Doan Dang

Teaching Associate, Monash University
Trang Dang is a teaching associate at Monash University, Australia, where she obtained her PhD in TESOL and an EAL teacher at Chisholm Institute in Australia. She is also a lecturer at Ho Chi Minh City Open University, Vietnam. She has published in the areas of TESOL, ELT, and researcher development in higher education studies.

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Travis Campbell

Assistant Professor of Economics, Southern Oregon University
Travis Campbell is an Assistant Professor of Economics at Southern Oregon University. His research applies microeconomics to social justice issues, focusing on economic inequalities by race, gender, and sexuality in the US. His other research focuses on social movements and public health policy, among other topics. His research has been published in The Lancet Regional Health – Americas, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Health Economics, Metroeconomica, and others. He uses his research expertise to incorporate the economics of race, gender, and sexuality into all of his courses. At SOU he teaches Micro and Macroeconomics, Quantitative Methods and Application, Healthcare Economics, Labor Economics, and Gender Issues in Economics.

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Travis Nemkov

Assistant Research Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus
Travis Nemkov received his PhD in Biochemistry and Structural Biology from the University of Colorado Denver. He has proven to be an innovator and is quickly garnering recognition as a promising young scientist in the field of metabolomics with over 150 published papers and patents. Travis specializes in the development and implementation of high-throughput strategies for metabolomics and proteomics, which have contributed to the analysis of thousands of RBC, plasma, and platelet samples over the last few years.

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Travis Ralph-Donaldson

Lecturer, Faculty of Creative & Cultural Industries, University of Portsmouth
Travis Ralph-Donaldson is a lecturer in Video Games in Creative Technologies at the University of Portsmouth. His research includes the gamification of education and the integration of facial depth information to augment AVSR (Audio Visual Speech Recognition).

Aside from his lecturing role, he is also the CEO and CTO of Niter Ltd, which develops state-of-the-art gamified AI language pronunciation apps with a wide range of applications in language training and speech therapy.

Travis Ralph-Donaldson is currently developing software, DNN (Deep Neural Network) models and articulatory inversion research as part of the ERSC funded DELTEA project which aims to use pioneering AI technology and gamification to teach novel phonemes in French and Spanish to primary school students, in collaboration with the University of Southampton and Reading University.

Research interests:

• Gamification
• Video Game AI
• Articulatory Inversion
• AVDSR (Audio Visual Depth Speech Recognition)
• Neural Network Compression

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Treana Mayer

Postdoctoral Fellow in Microbiology, Colorado State University
After obtaining a DVM, I started a postdoctoral training program at Colorado State University with a two year Clinical Microbiology Residency, followed by a research fellowship in translational science. Currently working towards a second graduate degree (PhD) in Microbiology.

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Treisha Hylton

Assistant Professor, Faculty of Social Work, Wilfrid Laurier University
Black Girl Stories/Black Studies
Dr. Treisha Hylton is a Black Feminist interdisciplinary scholar in the field of Social Work, Child and Youth Care, and Criminology. Dr. Hylton’s research and teaching is centered in Black Studies and particularly focused on Black Girls, Women, Sports and Community Engagement.

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Trevor Hedberg

Assistant Professor of PrI am an Assistant Professor of Practice jointly affiliated with the W.A. Franke Honors College and the Philosophy Department at the University of Arizona. I teach ethics courses that contribute to various degree programs in the Honors College and Philosophy Department. These programs include the Health and Human Values minor, the Future Earth Resilience minor, the Civic Leadership Certificate, the Philosophy major, the Philosophy minor, and the bioethics minor. I also work with philosophy graduate students to prepare them for the job market.

My research interests are primarily in areas of ethics and applied ethics, especially bioethics, environmental ethics, and the intersection of those areas. In the past, I have published work on topics such as marketing ethics, animal ethics, environmental hope, the ethics of procreation, epistemic supererogation, and apatheism.

actice, W.A. Franke Honors College / Philosophy Department, University of Arizona

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Trevor Mazzucchelli

Associate professor, Curtin University
Trevor Mazzucchelli is a Senior Lecturer of Clinical Psychology in the School of Psychology.

Trevor has been a registered and practising clinical psychologist since 1994. He has extensive clinical experience in providing empirically supported treatments for emotional and behavioural disorders having worked in various public and private settings including Western Australia’s Disability Services Commission, Western Australia’s Department of Health, Triple P International, and in private practice. He has developed programs to assist parents of children with disability prevent and manage commonly encountered behavioural and emotional problems, and trained many practitioners to support parents in using these programs.

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Trevorv Pitcher

Professor, Great Lakes Institute for Environmental Research, University of Windsor
Our lab (housed at the Great Lakes Institute for Environmental Research, University of Windsor) investigates scientific questions related to evolutionary biology, reproductive ecology, and conservation biology using fishes (both economically important species and species at risk) from the Great Lakes Basin and the west/east coast of Canada. Our primary species of study include (among others) Chinook Salmon, Redside Dace, Lake Sturgeon, Atlantic Salmon, and Lake Trout.

We conduct field research across the Great Lakes basin (and on each coast of Canada) and we employ molecular ecology approaches including (among others) population genetics, environmental DNA (eDNA), proteomics, and transcriptomics. In addition to our foundational research program focused on genetic quality in wild populations we also apply this knowledge to; (1) improve captive breeding for endangered and threatened species of fishes, (2) increase the fitness of fishes released from fish hatcheries and (3) inform and improve the sustainability of salmon aquaculture. Our lab also focuses on questions related to reintroduction biology in species as varied as fishes, frogs and snakes.

In order to offer students unique experiential learning opportunities and to educate the public about science we founded the Freshwater Restoration Ecology Centre (FREC, see video below and link in banner for more details) in partnership between the Town of LaSalle and the University of Windsor. This facility houses unique infrastructure, species at risk experimental populations, and access to the Lake Huron-Erie Corridor via the Detroit River.

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Trevor Robbins

Professor of Neuroscience, University of Cambridge
Trevor is Professor of Cognitive Neuroscience at the University of Cambridge from 1997, being based in Cambridge for most of his scientific career and receiving his PhD there in 1975. He was also Professor of Expt. Psychology and Head of the Dept. of Psychology (2002-2017).

He is a Fellow of the British Psychological Society (1990), British Pharmacological Society (2017), Academy of Medical Sciences (2000), and Royal Society (2005), the most prestigious science society in the U.K. He has published over 950 peer-reviewed articles, (H index 208, Web of Science; 256, Google Scholar). He has co-edited nine books, most recently (with N. Fineberg) Neurobiology and Treatment of OCD: Accelerating Progress. (Springer, 2021). He edits Psychopharmacology (since 1980) and Current Opinion in the Behavioral Sciences, and is an editorial advisor for Science.

Trevor directs the ‘Behavioural and Clinical Neuroscience Institute’ (founded in 2005) the mission of which is to enhance translation from basic to clinical neuroscience. In 1987, he co-invented the CANTAB computerized neuropsychological test battery, used in over 700 centres world-wide. He is especially interested in frontal lobe function, including cognitive flexibility and its neurochemical modulation, relevant to clinical disorders especially of impulsive-compulsive behaviour.

He received the Distinguished Scientific Contribution Award from the American Psychological Association (2011). In 2014 he shared the Brain Prize of the Grete Lundbeck European Brain Research Foundation, the most valuable in neuroscience, for his work on human mental disorders. He received Lifetime Achievement Awards from the British Association for Psychopharmacology (2015) and the British Psychological Society (2018). In 2016, he received the Robert Sommer Award for research into schizophrenia. In 2017 he received the Gold Medal of the Society for Biological Psychiatry (USA) and the Goldman-Rakic Award (from the Brain and the Behavior Foundation) for outstanding research in cognitive neuroscience. Trevor has been rated by Semantic Scholar as the "4th Most Influential Neuroscientist of the Modern Era". He received the William James Fellow Award of the Association for Psychological Science (2021) and high research rankings in both Psychology and Neuroscience according to res.com (2022).
https://research.com/scientists-rankings/neuroscience/psychology
He was made a CBE in the U.K. New Year’s Honours list. in 2012 "for services to medical research".

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Trevor Smith

PhD Candidate in Mechanical Engineering, West Virginia University
BIO

Trevor Smith graduated from WVU in 2021 with a BS in Mechanical Engineering and a BS in Aerospace Engineering. Now he is pursuing his PhD in Mechanical Engineering, studying computational swarm robotics. Outside of research he enjoys robotics competitions and outreach. He competes in the University Rover Challenge Team as an Overall Team lead and as and inter-subteam. In addition to being a member of the WVU Robotics club (that teaches primarily freshman and sophmores about robotics), he mentors local high school Vex Robotics teams.

RESEARCH STATEMENT

Robotic swarms are a newly emerging field in robotics that provides the advantages of high adaptability and non-single point failure, over conventional single agent robots. Since robotic swarms leverage simple and local agent rules, they can achieve tasks that are intractable for conventional robots to solve. This is because each robot in the swarm only has to solve a simple problem, which collectively emerges to solve the complex global task. While conventional robotics require an individual robot to directly solve the entire complex problem. This process perfectly mirrors computational methods such as Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). Where instead of trying to analytically solve a complex flow field (conventional robotics), the flow is discretized into multiple simple fluid elements that each solve for the local flow at that element (robotic swarms). Therefore, if each robot in the swarm is envisioned as a finite element, computational methods, such as CFD, can be applied as agent level rules. This mitigates the great difficulty of determining appropriate local agent rules to achieve a given global task, due to the implicitness of global swarm robotics solutions. Thus my research is in developing a generalized method for designing swarm robotics algorithms using computational methods

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Trevor Tombe

Professor of Economics, University of Calgary
Dr. Tombe is a Professor of Economics at the University of Calgary and a Research Fellow at The School of Public Policy. Prior to joining the University of Calgary in 2012, he was an Assistant Professor of Economics at Wilfrid Laurier University. He received his BBA (Finance) from Simon Fraser University, and his MA and PhD (Economics) from the University of Toronto. His research focuses on a broad range of topics from international trade and public finance to energy and environmental policy. Currently his main focus is on economic integration in Canada, from estimating the size and consequences of interprovincial trade costs to exploring the implications of fiscal transfers between provinces (such as through equalization). In addition to his academic work, he regularly promotes the public understanding of economics and policy issues through his numerous public policy papers through the School, active social media presence, and general interest writings in various media outlets, including regular contributions to CBC Calgary and The Hub.

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Trichur Vidyasagar

Professor, Department of Optometry and Vision Sciences and Melbourne Neuroscience Institute, University of Melbourne

Trichur Vidyasagar (called Sagar) is a neuroscientist, with a special interest in vision. He is a professor in the Department of Optometry & Vision Sciences at the University of Melbourne and also an affiliate of the Melbourne Neuroscience Institute.

Sagar first qualified as a medical doctor from the University of Madras. Having already been involved in research into vision and neuroscience during his undergraduate years, he proceeded to do a PhD at the University of Manchester, exploring neuroplasticity in the developing sensory system. He then moved to the Department of Neurobiology at the Max-Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Goettingen. During the 10 years at MPI, he studied the basic neural circuitry underlying visual perception. This work, which has continued when he moved to Australia, first to The Australian National University (John Curtin School of Medical Research and School of Psychology) and then to The University of Melbourne, has led to a new theory of how basic attributes of a visual scene such as lines, colours and movement are coded by the brain. This understanding could help not only in being able to explain many perceptual disturbances but also the development of neural prostheses for the blind.

One of Sagar’s other research areas is the neural basis of visual attention and memory. This work is undertaken in both human subjects at the cognitive level as well as in trained macaques at the cellular level, thus seeking to link our understanding from the cellular to cognitive stages. The work of his team has also helped to elucidate the neural mechanisms that different parts of the brain use to communicate with each other. This research programme has led to insights into the neural processes that enable the brain to search for objects in the cluttered world around us and match our perceptions to stored memories, helping to further understand a number of neurological disorders such as dyslexia, ADHD and schizophrenia. Most notably, Sagar has developed a new theory that describes the neural machinery that we use for reading and identifies a basic aspect of visuo-spatial attention as the underlying reason for the differences in reading performance between good and poor readers.

Sagar has over 75 peer-reviewed publications in neuroscience. Additionally, he has had a life-long interest in the ecological impact of the food we eat and done his own (unpublished) calculations that show how even halving the present meat and dairy consumption in the world could potentially prevent catastrophic global warming due to the reduction in its direct ecological footprint and due to the carbon sequestration from the reforestation of large tracks of current pasture and croplands that were previously woodlands.

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Tricia Wachtendorf

Professor of Sociology and Director, Disaster Research Center, University of Delaware
Tricia Wachtendorf is a Professor of Sociology at the University of Delaware and Director of the Disaster Research Center – the oldest center in the world focused on the social science aspects of disaster. Her most recent book, American Dunkirk: The Waterborne Evacuation of Manhattan on 9/11, is coauthored with James Kendra and available through Temple University Press. Over the past three decades, her research has focused on multi-organizational coordination before, during and after disasters, improvisation, and social vulnerability to disaster events. Dr. Wachtendorf has engaged in quick response fieldwork after such events as the 2001 World Trade Center attacks, the 2020 Covid-19 pandemic, the tsunamis affecting India, Sri Lanka (2004) and Japan (2011), Hurricanes Katrina (2005) and Sandy (2012), as well as the earthquakes in China (2008) and Haiti (2010). With numerous research grants from agencies such as the National Science Foundation, she has published widely on improvisation in disasters as well as disaster convergence.

Research Interest

​Multi-organizational coordination before, during and after disasters, transnational crises, improvisation and adaptation, and social vulnerability to disasters.

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Tries Blandine Razak

Researcher, IPB University

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Triesanto Romulo Simanjuntak

Dosen, Universitas Kristen Satya Wacana
Saya mengambil master pada program Hubungan Internasional di Universitas Gadjah Mada dalam konsentrasi Politik Internasional. Saat ini bidang minat kajian saya dalam lingkup diplomasi dan juga politik luar negeri yang terjadi pada era politik kontemporer.

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Trina Rytwinski

Senior Research Scientist, Canadian Centre for Evidence-Based Conservation, Carleton University
I'm a research scientist with the Canadian Centre for Evidence-Based Conservation at Carleton University. My research focuses on understanding the circumstances in which anthropogenic impacts (e.g., roads, dams) affect wildlife populations. I’m particularly interested in determining which species or species groups are most vulnerable to human impacts, and determining ways to mitigate negative effects. My research has focused on two main themes: (1) using evidence synthesis to inform management decisions, and (2) the impacts of roads on wildlife populations.

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Triona Fitton

Senior Lecturer in Sociology and Student Success, University of Kent
Triona Fitton is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research at the University of Kent, and a Senior Fellow of Advance HE. She's interested in charitable action, charity shops and second hand consumption and has published a number of articles in this area. She is also interested in intersectional inequalities and precarity in education, especially race and class.

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Trish Audette-Longo

Assistant Professor of Journalism Studies, Carleton University
Trish Audette-Longo teaches digital journalism, reporting and writing at Carleton University in Ottawa. Her research areas include: digital, start-up and alternative journalism and media; journalism education; climate journalism; and petroculture studies.

Trish holds a PhD in Communication Studies from Concordia University, an MSc in Media, Communication and Development from the London School of Economics and Political Science, and a Bachelor of Journalism from Carleton. Trish has covered the environment, politics and crime beats for The Edmonton Journal and managed digital engagement for Canada's National Observer. Her reporting has appeared in a cross-section of Postmedia publications, J-Source, Alberta Views, and the Hill Times, and her academic work has been published in the journals Journalism Practice, the International Journal of Communication, Resilience, Topia, Development in Practice, the Canadian Journal of Communication, and Facts and Frictions.

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Tristan Derham

Research Associate, ARC Centre of Excellence for Australian Biodiversity and Heritage (CABAH) Policy Hub – Training and Education, University of Tasmania
My professional career has included business development, hazardous waste policy, lake research, and environmental impact assessment. My academic interests lie in environmental philosophy, ecology and the relationship between people and the environment. I'm a Research Associate at the University of Tasmania, working on policy issues for the ARC Centre of Excellence for Biodiversity and Heritage (CABAH) and undertaking cross disciplinary research between ecology and environmental ethics.

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Tristan Dissaux

Chercheur en socioéconiomie (CERMi, ULB), Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB)
Chercheur en socioéconomie, membre du CERMi à l'Université Libre de Bruxelles et post-doctoral fellow de la Fondation AXA pour la recherche.

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Tristan Harley

Senior Research Associate, Kaldor Centre for International Refugee Law, UNSW Sydney
Dr Tristan Harley is dual-trained as a lawyer and historian, and is a Senior Research Associate at the Kaldor Centre for International Refugee Law in the Faculty of Law & Justice. Tristan is recognised as an international expert in the fields of international refugee and human rights law. He has published widely in the field, including as co-author of Refugees, Regionalism and Responsibility (Edward Elgar Press, 2016) with Professor Penelope Mathew. He has also worked as a consultant for the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), the World Refugee Council, the Asia Pacific Refugee Rights Network, the Asia Pacific Network of Refugees, the Asia Pacific Network for Refugees, and Act for Peace.

Tristan's current research focuses on the international law and policy framework governing the meaningful participation of refugees in decision-making processes that affect them. Tristan holds a PhD from UNSW, a Juris Doctor (with First Class Honours) from UNSW, a Bachelor of Arts Advanced (with First Class Honours in History) from the University of Sydney, and a Graduate Diploma in Legal Practice from the Australian National University. He is also admitted as a lawyer of the High Court of Australia and the Supreme Court of New South Wales.

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Tristan Muller

Doctorant en Science des Aliments, Université Laval
Tristan Muller is a PhD candidate in the Department of Food Sciences at Université Laval, Quebec, Canada, under the supervision of Dr. Laurent Bazinet. He is affiliated with the Institute of Nutrition and Functional Foods (INAF) and the Laboratory of Food Processing and Electro Membrane Processes. His research is driven by a keen interest in the causes and consequences of climate change, particularly focusing on the impacts of food systems.

Tristan has recognized that promoting plant-based proteins is a crucial strategy for mitigating climate change. Designing nutritious products based on these proteins has become his primary objective. After completing his master's degree at AgroParisTech in France, he relocated to Quebec City, Canada, to pursue his goal of studying leaf proteins for human consumption. He is committed to advancing his research with the aim of contributing to the broader acceptance and utilization of these unconventional yet highly valuable protein sources.

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Tristan Salles

Senior Lecturer, University of Sydney
My research areas revolve around sediment transfer from source-to-sink, sedimentary systems, geodynamic and landscape evolution, carbonate platforms and ocean dynamics. My main activities consist in the design and implementation of open-source numerical codes that improve our understanding of the complex interactions between sedimentary systems, climatic & tectonic forcing, and the physical processes that erode, transport, and deposit sediments.

My current fields of research are:

1. Reading past history from the stratigraphic record - Unraveling basin archives by developing state-of-the-art numerical models of sedimentary systems through space and time.
2. Learning Earth evolution to better prepare for the future - Tackling complex problems using holistic approaches that quantify earth surface processes interactions with both climatic, oceanic and tectonic forces.
3. Enabling cross-disciplinary research by linking data to whole Earth models - Working across temporal and spatial scales fostering new knowledge related to biodiversity, coral reef and ocean hydrodynamic.
4. Designing open-source software for the geoscience community - Promoting reproducible science and open source software by making numerical codes & workflows available for both Industry, Research & Teaching.

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Tristan Smith

I have three principle fields of research interest: Low Carbon Shipping The development and implementation of technologies and operational practices for the reduction of CO2 emission from shipping. This research area is highly multi-disciplinary, and while my focus is on the development of techno-economic models for the shipping industry and the design of robust and effective policy and instruments for CO2 emission reduction, my research interests cover all aspects of shipping economics, logistics and operation. Marine Renewables Wave, offshore wind and tidal power offer significant potential as low carbon energy supplies of the future. My research interest is in developing and performing hydrodynamic and structural analysis of these devices to establish both their performance and their safety (from a structural integrity perspective). Safety of Damaged Ships and Offshore Structures Ships and offshore structures are designed to withstand structural loads which in accidents can be exceeded. They may then have to survive in a harsh environment before remedial action or recovery to a safe haven can be achieved. This research interest is focused on the development of analysis techniques to assess the survivability of damaged structures in waves - with particular focus on the fluid structure interaction of flooded damaged structures.

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Troy Hicks

Professor of English and Education, Central Michigan University
Troy Hicks, PhD, is Professor of English and Education at Central Michigan University, where he collaborates with K–12 colleagues to explore how they implement newer literacies in their classrooms and teaches master’s and doctoral courses in educational technology. He is also Director of the Chippewa River Writing Project, a site of the National Writing Project. A former middle school teacher, he has received numerous awards including the Michigan Reading Association Teacher Educator Award and the Central Michigan University Excellence in Teaching Award, and is an ISTE Certified Educator, a trained facilitator in digital storytelling through StoryCenter and story exchanges through Narrative4, and an affiliate faculty member with the Media Education Lab.

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Troy Meston

Senior research fellow - Griffith Centre for Social and Culture Research, Griffith University
Dr Troy Meston is a Gamilleroi Senior Research Fellow in the Griffith Centre for Social and Culture Research. His work employs critical Indigenous studies and decolonial praxis to investigate the intersections between education, technology & Indigenous studies. He has amassed a diversified body of work, constructed curriculum, and industry outputs across the areas of Indigenous sport, financial literacy, cognitive science, Indigenous health, and education. Troy applies national research acumen from roles with peak bodies, such as the Australian Sports Commission and Australian Institute of Sport, where he developed the 'Yulunga: Indigenous Games' publication, and managed Indigenous athletes in a program which led toward the Bejing and London Olympic games. He is a former Research Fellow with the Australian Council for Educational Research, where as part of an Indigenous team, he produced outputs for the Prime Minister and Cabinet, ASIC, and the ARC Science of Learning Research Centre. Troy is currently the Indigenous pedagogy leader on the 'Digitising the deep past: Machine learning, rock art and Indigenous engagements with 21st century technology' project, working with Indigenous learners in remote communities.

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Troy Riddell

Associate Professor and Chair, Department of Political Science, University of Guelph
Troy Riddell is Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of Political Science. His research interests focus primarily on judicial politics and process (such as exploring the relationship between judicial appointments, judicial independence and accountability and judicial decision-making) and criminal justice policy (such as sentencing, and the implementation of Charter of Rights decisions).

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Trygve Ugland

Professor of Politics and International Studies, Bishop's University
Dr. Trygve Ugland was educated at University of Oslo and Queen’s University of Belfast (Ph.D. University of Oslo, 2002). His research and teaching interests lie in the fields of Comparative Politics and Comparative Public Policy, with a focus on European and Scandinavian Politics. His work has appeared, for example, in the journals Journal of Common Market Studies, Journal of Public Policy and Scandinavian Political Studies.

His two most recent books include:
- Jean Monnet and Canada: Early Travels and the Idea of European Unity (2011, University of Toronto Press)
- Policy Learning from Canada: Reforming Scandinavian Immigration and Integration Policies (2018, University of Toronto Press)

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