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Robert Smith

Lecturer in International Relations, Coventry University

the theory and practice of statebuilding; contemporary Iraqi politics; counterinsurgency strategies in post-conflict environments; and British foreign policy during the Blair era. His PhD thesis looked at the US-led reconstruction of the Iraqi state following the invasion in 2003.

Ongoing research considers the development of the Iraqi state since regime change, with particular interest devoted to the Kurdistan Regional Government. He is currently writing with Mark Garnett and Simon Mabon (Lancaster University) a textbook on British Foreign Policy since 1945. He has taught International Relations at Lancaster University and the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst. He worked for the UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office within the Iraq Policy Unit in 2003-4, and recently operated as a political and security analyst based in Erbil, Kurdistan.

Research Areas:

Contemporary politics of the Middle East, especially Iraq
Kurdistan Regional Government and Iraqi Kurdish politics
Statebuilding and Nationbuilding
United States Foreign Policy
British Foreign Policy
Contemporary security issues and the “War on Terror;” Counterinsurgency
Human Rights.

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Robert Taylor

Robert is a Senior Lecturer in Public Law. He joined the School of Law as a lecturer in September 2014. Prior to this, Robert studied at Durham Law School, graduating with a LLB (Hons) in 2008, an MJur in 2011, and a PhD in 2014. In 2016, Robert became a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (FHEA).

Robert is a leading researcher in UK Public Law and his work has been published in Public Law, the Modern Law Review and the Edinburgh Law Review. In 2020-21, Robert completed a Scottish Parliament Academic Fellowship on Brexit Statutory Instruments. On 18 May 2022 he gave evidence to the European Scrutiny Committee at the UK Parliament on the potential impact of the proposed Brexit Freedoms Bill on retained EU law in Scotland.

From 2021-222, Robert was a visiting scholar at Edinburgh Law School researching the constitutional foundations of the Union between England and Scotland.

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Robert Winstanley-Chesters

Robert is a Research Fellow at Australian National University, College of Asia and the Pacific and a Visiting Research Fellow in the School of Geography at the University of Leeds. He obtained his doctorate from Leeds’ with the Thesis “Ideology and the Production of Landscape in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea”. Rowman and Littlefield’s Lexington Press published Robert’s monograph “Environment, Politics and Ideology in North Korea: Landscape as Political Project” in November 2014. Robert's new monograph "New Goddesses of Mt Paektu: Gender, Violence, Myth and Transformation in Korean Landscapes" co-authored with Victoria Ten will be published in winter 2016/2017 with Lexington Press. Robert is currently researching the Historical Geographies of Korean forestry, Colonial Mineralogical landscapes/inheritances, the place of topography within Pyongyang's charismatic narrative of the life of Kim Jong-suk and Animal/Creaturely Geographies of North Korea.

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Robert John Young

My research has always been focused on understanding animal behaviour and how it can be used to improve animal conservation and animal welfare. Although, much of his research is applied some of it addresses fundamental questions about how animals communicate, for example. In recent times my captive research has focused on questions regarding “Fitness for the Ark”; that is, can captive (zoo) animals be used in reintroduction programmes and what training might they need to survive in the wild. In the field I have studied primates, maned wolves, fish and birds. I am particularly interested in the human wildlife interface in how sound pollution from mining activities affects wildlife. And in human-animal interactions in urban environments especially how such interactions can be managed. My research approach is both interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary as I believe strongly that this is how we will be able to answer the ‘big questions’. Thus, I collaborate widely with researchers that include engineers, geographers, mathematicians, psychologists and sport scientists.

I have always been fascinated by the natural world and the need to conserve it for future generations. Thus, I studied Biology BSc (Hons) at the University of Nottingham (graduated 1989), followed by a PhD at the University of Edinburgh (graduated 1993) in animal behaviour/animal welfare under the supervision of Prof. Alistair Lawrence. I then embarked on a wildlife career working as Research Coordinator for the Royal Zoological Society of Scotland (Edinburgh Zoo), where I was able to put into practice much of the theory I had gained during my university education. In 2001, I moved to Brazil, as a Professor of Animal Behaviour, to further fulfill my ambition to study wildlife. Here I developed a number of long term research projects on primate species (notably titi monkeys and marmosets), birds, carnivores and urban wildlife. At the beginning of 2013 I moved to the University of Salford to take-up a Chair in Wildlife Conservation.

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Roberta Attanasio

Associate Professor of Biology, Georgia State University, Georgia State University

Research scientist in immunology and environmental toxicology; instructor of immunology, environmental health, and sustainability-related courses; instructor of women leadership courses, with emphasis on leadership in the sciences.

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Robin Cohen

Robin Cohen is Professor Emeritus of Development Studies, University of Oxford. Prior to his Oxford appointment in 2007, he was Professor of Sociology at the University of Warwick. He also held appointments at the Universities of Ibadan, Birmingham, Cape Town and the West Indies and short-term positions at Stanford, Toronto and Berkeley. He was editor of the Routledge series on Global diasporas and of the Cambridge survey of world migration.

His books on migration include The new helots: migrants in the international division of labour (1987, 1993, 2003), Contested domains: debates in international labour studies (1991), Frontiers of identity (1994), Global diasporas: an introduction (1997, rev. 2008), Migration and its enemies (2006) and Encountering difference (2016). He directed the International Migration Institute, part of the Oxford Martin School (2009–11), and was principal investigator on the Oxford Diasporas Programme, covering 11 projects, funded by the Leverhulme Trust (2011–5).

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Robin Jeffrey

Professor Robin Jeffrey has published, with his colleague Assa Doron, The Great Indian Phone Book (London: C. Hurst/New York: Harvard University Press, 2013). The book is published in India by Hachette under the title of Cell Phone Nation. It was launched in New Delhi on 18 February 2013 by Mrinal Pande, chair of Prasar Bharati, India's equivalent of the BBC. The book analyzes the expansion of mobile telephone and its implications for society, politics and economics.

Professor Jeffrey is a co-editor of "Being Muslim in South Asia," a collection under contract to Oxford University Press to be published in 2013, and a co-editor of "Mughals and Mandarins," studies of the Chinese and Indian media by analysts and practitioners.

His long-term work focuses on a book called Slices of India, a history of India in the second half of the 20th century based around the years of the great Kumbh Mela in Allahabad.

Professor Jeffrey has written about Kerala, Punjab and Indian media. A third edition of India’s Newspaper Revolution was published in 2010.

He first lived in India as a school teacher in Chandigarh from 1967 to 1969 and has lived for six years in India between 1967 and 2010. He has published a number of books and contributes regularly to policy papers, reports and journals.

Professor Jeffrey completed a doctorate in Indian history at Sussex University in the United Kingdom in 1973. He taught for 25 years in the Politics Program at La Trobe University in Melbourne, and worked twice at the Australian National University in Canberra.

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Robrecht Declercq

Robrecht Declercq is a postdoctoral researcher at the Research Foundation – Flanders (FWO) since the 1st of October 2017 and is affiliated with the History Department of Ghent University. His main research interests include business, global economics, and environmental history. He teaches on economic and environmental history.

In February 2015, Declercq defended his PhD on the global connections of the Leipzig Fur Industry at the European University Institute (EUI) in Florence. This PhD research examined how a local industrial district – like the Leipzig fur industry – characterised by many small to medium-sized businesses successfully operated on the world market in the period between 1870 and 1939. It bridges the interior-based research tradition on industrial districts with that of global economic history. In 2016, his research was nominated for the Best Dissertation Award in Bergen (Norway), by the European Business History Association (EBHA). As of June 2017, the PhD has been published as a book by Routledge, titled “World Market Transformation: Inside the German Fur Capital Leipzig 1870 – 1939”.

His current research project is also situated at the crossroads of business and global economic history, examining the impact of nationalizations in the copper industry (Central Africa and Latin America) on the global political economy.

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Robyn Dowling

Professor and Associate Dean Research, University of Sydney

Robyn is an urban geographer and planner in the Faculty of Architecture Design and Planning. She has research expertise in patterns of urban mobility, transport disruptions, and urban governance in the face of climate change.

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Rod Lamberts

Dr Rod Lamberts is deputy director of the Australian National Centre for Public Awareness of Science (CPAS) at the ANU, which recently became affiliated with the Alan Alda Centre for Communicating Science at Stony Brook University. He is also a former national president of the Australian Science Communicators. Rod has been providing science communication consultation and evaluation advice for nearly 20 years to organisations including UNESCO, the CSIRO, and to ANU science and research bodies. He has a background in psychology, anthropology and corporate communication consultancy and facilitation.

Rod has been developing and delivering science communication courses since 1998, and supervises a large range of postgraduate research projects.

His professional and research interests include: science in society; science and public policy; perceptions of expertise in science; risk and crisis perception/ communication; and science communication as the new public intellectualism.

Rod is an extremely strong proponent of getting academia well beyond the hallowed halls and into the real world. His most recent forays into this world include regular appearances on ABC Radio National "Research Filter" and ABC radio Perth's "Blinded by Science". He was also a co-host of KindaThinky, and irreverent, theme-based chat show that ran in Canberra in 2014 and 15.

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Rodney Croft

Professor of Health Psychology, University of Wollongong

Croft has a PhD in psychology, with his thesis focusing on electrophysiology (EEG) methodology. His electrophysiology expertise has been extended into the RF-EMF health research, with his focus being laboratory research determining the effects of RF-EMF on awake and sleep EEG. Although a smaller aspect of his research, he has published RF-EMF epidemiological research, as well as substantial collaborative work employing in vitro and dosimetric methods to address the RF-EMF health issue. Croft is Director of the NHRMC CRE in RF-EMF health, the Australian Centre for Electromagnetic Bioeffects Research (ACEBR) and was Executive Director the forerunner Centre (Australian Centre for Radiofrequency Bioeffects Research), and is a Commissioner within the International Commission on Non-Ionising Radiation Protection (ICNIRP).

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Rodney Maddock

Rod has been a senior executive at the Commonwealth Bank for the last decade after earlier stints as Chief Economist for the Business Council of Australia, Head of Economic Policy in the Victorian Cabinet Office, and as a Professor of Economics at La Trobe University.

He is currently working on a book on the Australian economy.

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Rodney Stewart

Professor Rodney Stewart is the Digital Utility Transformation Professor at Griffith School of Engineering, Griffith University, located in Queensland, Australia. He conducts research on the applications of advanced technology (e.g. smart meters, network sensors, energy storage) and big data informatics for purpose of re-engineering the water and energy utility sectors.

In the water utility sector he has completed a number of high resolution smart water meter studies that provided the 'big data' to underpin detailed water end use studies, demand management strategies, bottom-up forecasting models, just-in-time pipe network infrastructure planning, water-energy nexus studies, post-meter and network leakage studies, to name a few.

In the electricity sector he is working on the necessary demand forecasting and power control systems that will provide cost-efficient power supply to customers through optimising existing and newly introduced renewable energy sources being added to the network through coupling them with distributed energy storage in an intelligent micro-grid arrangement. His goal is to conduct the necessary evidence-based research to demonstrate the numerous applications and benefits of intelligent water and electricity networks in order to accelerate the current slow rate of transformation of national and international utilities to the digital era.

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Roger Barlow

Roger joined Huddersfield in February 2011, having previously been at Manchester. After his PhD at Cambridge, he has worked on particle physics experiments at DESY (TASSO, and the discovery of the gluon, and subsequently JADE, and the measurement of the B lifetime) , CERN (OPAL doing precision studies of the Z ), and SLAC(BaBar, and the discovery of CP violation in B mesons). He is currently a member of the LHCb collaboration.

He has written a textbook on Statistics, founded the Cockcroft Institute, started the ThorEA association, and originated the National Particle Physics Masterclasses. He was the PI of the CONFORM project that led to the successful operation of EMMA, the worlds's first nsFFAG accelerator.

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Roger Dargaville

Roger works on optimisation and integration of renewable energy systems, linking together different technologies to find the least expensive, most reliable systems with the lowest carbon emissions possible. He also researches the chemistry of the stratosphere, and the impact of ozone chemistry on the surface climate.

Prior to returning to Melbourne in 2008, he worked for the International Energy Agency on the Energy Technology Perspectives 2008 publication. He has worked to integrate observing systems for the global carbon cycle, and on the impact of climate change on the carbon cycle.

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Roger King

Roger King is visiting professor at the School of Management at the University of Bath. He is also adjunct professor at the Teaching and Education Development Institute at the University of Queensland, Australia. He is research associate at the Centre for the Analysis of Risk and Regulation, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Roger is co-chair of the Higher Education Commission inquiry, and helped produce a report called 'Regulating Higher Education', launched in parliament in October 2013.

He has also recently concluded a six-year period as Visiting Professor at the Centre for Higher Education Research and Information (CHERI) at the Open University. Previously, in the 2000s, he has been a Visiting Professor at the following Australian universities: Griffith, QUT, and Sunshine Coast. He has also been Visiting Research Fellow at the Association of Commonwealth Universities (2003-5).

He was Vice-Chancellor of the University of Lincoln (UK) from 1989-2001 and the founding Chair of the Institute for Learning and Teaching in Higher Education (now the Higher Education Academy) from 1998-2001. He has been a member of the Board of the Observatory of Borderless Higher Education (OBHE) since its founding in 2001. He has undertaken various consultancy and Board positions in recent years.

He is also the Series Co-Editor (with Noel Entwistle) of Palgrave Macmillan's Universities into the Twenty First Century, which has produced a dozen or so well-received titles since 2002. He is also co-convenor of the Higher Education Policy Group for the Political Studies Association. He is on the research advisory group of the QAA.

Recent book publications include: The State, Democracy and Globalization (2003); The University in the Global Age (2004); The Regulatory State in an Age of Governance (2007); Governing Universities Globally (2009); and a Handbook on Globalization and Higher Education (with Simon Marginson and Rajani Naidoo, 2011). In addition he has written a number of published journal and other articles, including on global science; network power and social constructivism; in higher education model diffusion; university rankings; and risk-based regulation.

Currently he is researching marketization, risk governance, and social networks in higher education policymaking.

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Roger Watson

Professor of Nursing, University of Hull

Roger Watson is a graduate of The University of Edinburgh with a PhD in biochemistry from The University of Sheffield who qualified in nursing at St George’s Hospital, London. Working in care of older people, he has a special interest in the feeding and nutritional problems of older people with dementia. He is Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Advanced Nursing and Editor of Nursing Open. A frequent visitor to the Far East, South East Asia and Australia, he has honorary and visiting positions in China, Hong Kong, and Australia. He is Professor of Nursing, University of Hull, UK and was a member of the UK 2014 Research Excellence Framework sub-panel for Allied Health Professions, Dentistry, Nursing and Pharmacy.

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Romola Adeola

Legal Researcher, University of Pretoria

Dr Romola Adeola is a legal researcher with the Centre for Human Rights, Faculty of Law, University of Pretoria in South Africa. Her areas of expertise are law and policy aspects of migration, refugee protection and international development law. She holds a Doctor of Laws degree from the University of Pretoria.

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Ron Hira

Dr. Ron Hira, Ph.D., P.E., is an associate professor in the Department of Political Science at Howard University. Ron is also a research associate with the Economic Policy Institute in Washington, DC. Prior to joining Howard, Ron was an assistant and then associate professor and acting chair in the Department of Public Policy at Rochester Institute of Technology. He specializes in policy issues on technological innovation, offshoring, high-skill immigration, and the American engineering workforce.

Hira has written widely on offshoring, high-skilled immigration, innovation, and the decline of the middle class. Hira is co-author of the book, Outsourcing America (AMACOM 2005; 2nd edition 2008), which was a finalist for best business book in the PMA's Benjamin Franklin Awards. The Boston Globe called Outsourcing America an "honest, disturbing look at outsourcing." The Washington Post described the book as a "thorough and easy to grasp primer on the wrenching outsourcing debate."

In 2012, along with Prof. John Ettlie, Hira organized a National Science Foundation workshop on the Globalization of Engineering Research & Development. The result of the workshop is being turned into a book.

Previously, Ron worked as a control systems engineer and program manager with Sensytech, NIST, and George Mason University (GMU). He has been a consultant to numerous public and private organizations.

Ron completed his Post-Doctoral Fellowship at Columbia University's Center for Science, Policy, and Outcomes. He holds a Ph.D. in Public Policy from George Mason University (GMU), an M.S. in Electrical Engineering also from GMU, and a B.S. in Electrical Engineering from Carnegie-Mellon University. He is a licensed professional engineer, a senior member of IEEE, and served as Vice President for Career Activities of IEEE-USA, the largest engineering professional society in America.

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Ron Johnston

Executive Director, Australian Centre for Innovation, University of Sydney

Professor Ron Johnston is Executive Director of the Australian Centre for Innovation (ACIIC) and a Professor in the Faculty of Engineering & IT at the University of Sydney.

Educated initially as a scientist in Australia, the UK and the US, he has devoted most of his career to develop a better understanding and application of the ways that science and technology contribute to economic and social development, of the possibilities for managing research and technology more effectively, and of insights into the processes and culture of innovation.

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Ronen Palen

Professor's Palan's work lies at the intersection between international relations, political economy, political theory, sociology and human geography. He wrote a number of books and numerous articles, book chapters and encyclopaedia entries on the subject of Offshore and Tax havens, state theory and international political economic theory. His work has been translated to Chinese, simple and complex characters, Japanese, Korean, Spanish, French, Russian, Italian, Azeri and Czech.

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Rosa Freedman

Senior Lecturer (Law), University of Birmingham

Rosa Freedman joined Birmingham Law School in 2011 having previously taught Law at Queen Mary, University of London. Rosa has written articles on legal matters for national media and online blogs, and has provided research and expertise to a number of NGOs. Her first book, The United Nations Human Rights Council: an early assessment was published in March 2013 and her second book Failing to Protect: The UN and Politicisation of Human Rights was published in May 2014.

Rosa researches and writes on the United Nations and international human rights law. She is interested in the extent to which UN human rights bodies discharge their mandates and the intersection of international law and international. Rosa has a broader interest in the impact of politics, international relations, the media, and civil society both on the work and proceedings of international institutions and on states’ compliance with international human rights norms.

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Rosie Shrout

Assistant Professor of Human Development and Family Studies, Purdue University
I joined Purdue University’s Human Development and Family Studies Department in Fall 2021. I earned my PhD in Interdisciplinary Social Psychology from the University of Nevada, Reno and completed a Presidential Postdoctoral Fellowship in the Ohio State University’s Institute for Behavioral Medicine Research. As a social-health psychologist with specialized training in psychoneuroimmunology and quantitative methods, I study how couples’ stress affects their relationships and health. My work focuses on the underlying psychological, behavioral, and biological pathways connecting stress to people’s own and their partners’ relational and physical health across adulthood and later life.

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Roslyn Russell

Professor Roslyn Russell is a Principal Research Fellow in the School of Economics, Finance and Marketing at RMIT University. Roslyn holds a PhD in Business and a Masters in Public Policy and Management.

Roslyn has been researching in the area of financial literacy and financial inclusion over the last 10 years. Roslyn works closely with the Australian Government, the financial and community sectors seeking to improve the financial well-being of Australians. Roslyn's research in recent years has focused on the factors influencing the financial decision-making of women. Much of Roslyn's research has been conducting evaluations of microfinance programs including Australia's leading financial literacy programs, Saver Plus and MoneyMinded.

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Ross Guest

Ross Guest is a Professor of Economics, and Dean (Learning and Teaching), in the Griffith Business School at Griffith University. He is an Adjunct Professor with the Australia and New Zealand School of Government (ANZSOG) and a National Senior Teaching Fellow with the Australian Government Office for Learning and Teaching.

Before joining Griffith University in 1998 he spent 8 years at Monash University in Melbourne where he was appointed Senior Lecturer in 1997. He has a Ph.D in Economics from the University of Melbourne and a Master of Higher Education from Griffith University.
His current research programme is concerned mainly with the economics of population ageing in Australia and other regions of the world. He has published articles on this and related topics in, for example, the Journal of Population Economics, the Journal of Macroeconomics, The Economic Record, The Review of Development Economics, The Journal of Policy Modelling, Oxford Economic Papers, The Singapore Economic Review, The Journal of Asian Economics, and Economic Modelling. He has received 4 ‘Discovery Grants’ from the Australian Research Council, as 1st Chief Investigator, to support this work. He was an invited participant at the Prime Minister’s 2020 Summit in 2008 on the basis of his work on population economics.
His teaching in recent years has been primarily in public economics at Griffith University and for ANZSOG in their Executive Master of Public Administration where he is a Subject Leader for Australia and New Zealand. He is Editor-In-Chief of the International Review of Economics Education, and co-author with Stiglitz et al. of Principles of Economics, First Australian Edition.

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Rowena Ball

Associate professor, Australian National University

I am an applied mathematician and physical chemist.

Currently I am working on the origin of life in the primordial soup! Another current interest is Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander scientific and engineering heritage.

As an experienced thermodynamicist I am concerned about the widespread misunderstanding of thermodynamics, particularly of the second law and the concept of entropy, among people who are otherwise scientifically literate. If you do not have good working knowledge of the fundamentals of thermodynamics – specifically the Maxwell relations and their Legendre transforms – then it is better not to mention entropy or the second law in your articles, because you will most likely get it hopelessly, even ridiculously, wrong.

Currently in my research I am working collaboratively on new high efficiency systems for separating carbon from fuels and flue gases.

A spinoff is that I have elucidated the oscillatory thermal instability that led to the Bhopal disaster and initiates explosion of peroxide bombs used by terrorists.

My research expertise in reactive thermal runaway and thermal explosions is also motivated by process safety. Serious and fatal thermal runaway incidents are quite common in chemical plants in Asia and in developing nations, although they are rarely reported in the Western press. (E.g, see http://articles.timesofindia.indiatimes.com/2011-08-19/hyderabad/29904559_1_kalpana-explosion-ketone.)

Most such incidents are preventable, but crucial knowledge that was made good use of by chemical engineers from the 1950s through the 1970s evidently never was learned in some relevant quarters. Ignorance is dangerous.

Recently I came across two papers in the refereed literature claiming to determine thermal runaway criteria for processes used to manufacture two types of explosives, which I read with horror and disbelief.

The authors prescribed operating criteria that they claimed are "safe" from thermal runaway, without carrying out ANY stability analysis. But there is a vicious oscillatory thermal instability in these systems, as an elementary stability analysis shows. Plant operators using their guidelines would be in for a nasty surprise - that is, if they survived. Due to their ignorance these authors' thermal 'safety' criteria are incorrect and dangerous.

This does not reflect well on the journals that published these two papers. Why were the serious shortcomings not picked up by referees?

In general science as fatally (literally) flawed as that in these two papers should not be left unchallenged but where real safety is involved and it puts human lives at risk one is morally obliged to correct it in the refereed literature. Our paper on this may be downloaded at http://arxiv.org/abs/1202.5550, it is published as: Ball, R., Gray, B.F., Thermal instability and runaway criteria: The dangers of disregarding dynamics. Process Safety and Environmental Protection (2012),
http://dx.doi.org/10.10/j.psep.2012.05.008.

On another front, I am researching the role of fire in sequestering CO2.

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Roxanne Dault

Roxanne Dault specializes in patient-oriented research and in knowledge transfer. She coordinates CLARET, a research project that looks at how citizens can give consent to the use of their health data for research purposes. She wants to help improve health care and build a fair and efficient health system where citizens play a central role.

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Ruby Acquah

Research Fellow, Economics of Trade, University of Sussex
Dr.Acquah is a Research Fellow in Economics of Trade at the University of Sussex

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Russell Blackford

I am a philosopher, literary critic, editor, and author, based at the University of Newcastle, Australia.

My recent books include: 50 Voices of Disbelief: Why We Are Atheists (Wiley-Blackwell, 2009; co-edited with Udo Schuklenk), Freedom of Religion and the Secular State (Wiley-Blackwell, 2012), 50 Great Myths About Atheism (Wiley-Blackwell, 2013; co-authored with Udo Schuklenk), Humanity Enhanced: Genetic Choice and the Challenge for Liberal Democracies (MIT Press, 2014), Intelligence Unbound: The Future of Uploaded and Machine Minds (Wiley-Blackwell, 2014; co-edited with Damien Broderick), and The Mystery of Moral Authority (Palgrave Pivot, 2016)..

I'm a prolific essayist and commentator with interests including legal and political philosophy, philosophical bioethics, philosophy of religion, and debates involving visions of the human future.

I am a Fellow with the Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies, a Laureate of the International Academy of Humanism, and Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Evolution and Technology.

I have also had some success as a science fiction and fantasy author, including my fantasy story "The Sword of God" (which won both a Ditmar Award and Aurealis Award in 1997) and an original trilogy written for the Terminator franchise. I've won the William Atheling, Jr., Award for Criticism and Review (in the fantasy and science fiction field) on three occasions, including for my co-authored book Strange Constellations: A History of Australian Science Fiction (Greenwood Press, 1999; co-authored with Van Ikin and Sean McMullen).

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Russell Dean Covey

Russell Covey, professor of law, focuses his research on criminal law and procedure. He is the author of numerous articles on topics including the death penalty, police interrogation, crime and popular culture, jury selection, and plea bargaining. As a member of the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers, Covey has filed amicus briefs and represented pro bono clients in criminal appeals in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit and the U.S. Supreme Court.

Prior to joining the College of Law, he clerked for Judge Allyne R. Ross of the U.S. District Court, E.D.N.Y., practiced law specializing in criminal and civil litigation at Williams & Connolly in Washington, D.C., and taught law at Whittier Law School in Southern California. Covey teaches courses in domestic and international criminal law and criminal procedure. He received his J.D. at Yale Law School, M.A. at Princeton University and A.B at Amherst College.

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Ruth Dalton

Professor Dalton is an alumna of University College London. As a licensed architect, she has worked for Foster and Partners (London) and Sheppard Robson Corgan Architects (London) and key projects upon which she has worked include the Carré d’Art de Nîmes, in France, the Palaçio de Congresos in Valencia, Spain, and the Kings Cross International Terminal (unbuilt). She has taught at the Architectural Association, London, the Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, USA and the Bartlett School of Architecture, UCL.

Professor Dalton’s research interests are centred around the relationship between the spatial layout of buildings and environments and their effect on how people understand and interact in those spaces. Professor Dalton is an expert in space syntax analysis and is passionately interested in the use of virtual environments as a method for researching human factors in the built environment.

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Ryan Blumenthal

Blumenthal. Ryan, MBChB (Pret), MMed (Med Forens) Pret, FC For Path (SA) Dip For Med (SA) PhD (Wits) Senior specialist forensic pathologist at the University of Pretoria’s Department of Forensic Medicine. His chief field of interest is the pathology of trauma of lightning (keraunopathology). He has been involved in the publication of numerous articles and textbooks on lightning and electrothermal injuries and has helped generate international standard operating procedures and guidelines for lightning strike fatality and electrocution victims. He has published widely in the fields of suicide and other areas involving the pathology of trauma. His chief mission in life is to advance Forensic Pathology Services both nationally and internationally. Interests outside of forensic pathology include sleight-of-hand-magic, mountain-biking, bird-watching, squash, running and novel writing. He also has a personal interest in innovative strategies and techniques in conflict resolution.

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Ryan Manuel

Dr Ryan Manuel is a postdoctoral fellow at the Australian Centre on China in the World, The Australian National University. His research looks at how power is exercised in the Chinese political system, and how that exercise of power affects China's domestic and foreign policy. His most recent book was A New Australia-China Agenda, with Geremie Barmé.

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