Menu

Search

Anastasia Nesvetailova

Dr Anastasia Nesvetailova (MA Manchester, PhD Aberystwyth) joined City in September 2007. Her main research and teaching interests lie in the area of International Political Economy (IPE), finance and financial crises, globalisation and governance.

Her first monograph, Fragile Finance: Debt, Speculation and Crisis in the Age of Global Credit (2007, Palgrave), develops a Minskyan analysis of financial fragility and crises in the late 1990s. Her second monograph, Financial Alchemy in Crisis: The Great Liquidity Illusion (2010, Pluto) focuses on the elusive concept of 'liquidity' in global finance, and specifically, in the global financial crisis of 2007-2009.

Dr Nesvetailova is currently working on the political economy of financial innovation, liquidity and international financial governance.

  More

Less

Anderson Jeremiah

Lecturer in the department of Politics, Philosophy and Religion, Lancaster University

Anderson Jeremiah holds a Ph.D degree from the Centre for the Study of World Christianity at New College, the University of Edinburgh and is an ordained Anglican Priest. His areas of academic interest include Christian Theology in Asia, Postcolonial Approaches to Theology, Diaspora Christianity, Dalit Studies, Contextual Theologies, History of Christianity, Modern Missionary Movements, Inculturation, Recent trends in World Christianity, Biblical Hermeneutics, Economics and Liberation Theology, Interface between Christianity and other Religions, Inter-Faith Understanding, Religious fundamentalism and Politics, Hinduism and Buddhism, and Religious Studies. His recent research in collaboration with local churches in UK includes: 'Traditions in Conflict: the impact of immigrant-based churches on traditional church bodies in the UK', 'The Changing 'Colour' of World Christianity: understanding the trends in the modern growth and expansion of Christianity'

  More

Less

Andrea Carson

Lecturer, Media and Politics, School of Social and Political Sciences; Honorary Research Fellow, Centre for Advancing Journalism, University of Melbourne

Dr Andrea Carson completed a PhD on the future of investigative journalism and Australian broadsheet newspapers. She has a Masters in International Politics (UoM) and was a journalist who started her journalism career in newspapers (The Age) before working in radio (ABC 774, RRR), online and television (7.30 Report). She holds a BA in politics and English literature.

  More

Less

Andrea Ghiselli

Assistant Professor, School of International Relations and Public Affairs, Fudan University
I am an Assistant Professor at the School of International Relations and Public Affairs (SIRPA) of Fudan University. I am also a Non-Resident Research Fellow with the TOChina Hub and the Head of Research for the TOChina Hub’s ChinaMed Project. I am also a member of the Editorial Team of OrizzonteCina.

With a focus on China and Sino-Middle Eastern relations, my research seeks to explain how a rising power’s foreign and security policy is shaped by its own domestic politics as well as that of other countries.

At SIRPA, the subjects that I teach include foreign policy analysis, Chinese diplomacy, as well as academic publishing.

I am also a reviewer for International Security, International Affairs, International Studies Quarterly, China Quarterly, Asia Policy, Asian Security, Journal of Strategic Studies, Journal of Contemporary China, Cambridge Review of International Affairs, International Politics, The International Spectator, Italian Political Science Review, Armed Forces & Society, and The China Review. I also review book manuscripts for Oxford University Press, Columbia University Press and Australia National University Press.

  More

Less

Andrew Biankin

Professor and Regius Chair of Surgery, Director of Translational Research Centre, University of Glasgow

Andrew Biankin is a surgeon-scientist whose research goals are to improve outcomes for individuals with pancreatic cancer through the development of early detection and novel therapeutic strategies based on molecular phenotyping and the delineation and implementation of biomarkers that facilitate clinical decision-making. He contributes to the International Cancer Genome Consortium through extensively characterising the genomic, transcriptomic and epigenomic aberrations in pancreatic cancer, and is extending this knowledge to a personalized model of cancer care, where molecular characteristics guide treatment decisions.

  More

Less

Andrew Biro

Professor, Politics, Acadia University
I am a Professor in the department of Politics at Acadia University. I also teach in Acadia's Environmental and Sustainability Studies, and Social and Political Thought programs. My teaching and research interests are at the intersections of critical theory, environmental politics, political economy, and media/cultural studies.

  More

Less

Andrew Blick

Dr. Blick's main areas of interest are the constitutional future of the UK, the contemporary significance of Magna Carta, the Civil Service, special advisers, and the office of Prime Minister. He uses an historical perspective to asses contemporary issues.

Before his academic appointment Dr Blick had extensive experience working for think tanks, in the UK Parliament and as an administrative assistant at No.10 Downing Street. Dr. Blick has acted as an adviser to democratic reform groups in countries including Ukraine and Turkey; and to the International Institute for Democracy and Electoral Assistance in Stockholm. He has carried out consultancy work for the United Nations Development Programme, European Commission, European Parliament, and UK National Audit Office. Since 2010 he has been research fellow to the first ever parliamentary inquiry into the possibility of introducing a written constitution for the UK, being carried out by the House of Commons Political and Constitutional Reform Committee.

  More

Less

Andrew Bubak

Assistant Research Professor of Neurology, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus
I am a neurovirologist interested in understanding viral-contributions to multi-system disease states including Alzheimer’s disease, cardio- and cerebrovascular disorders, diabetes, and cancer. I generate large datasets derived from patient samples/clinical data and apply complex bioinformatic analyses to produce meaningful, clinically translatable information such as biomarker and drug target discovery. My research at the level of Principal Investigator or Co-Investigator has been awarded over $17.5 mil from the National Institute of Health (NIH) and resulted in the development of national and international patents for novel drug discoveries to treat debilitating diseases.

  More

Less

Andrew Carr

Research Fellow, Strategic and Defence Studies Centre - Australian National University, Co-Editor of the journal Security Challenges , Editor - Centre of Gravity Policy paper series

  More

Less

Andrew Cumbers

Before moving to Glasgow, I worked at the Universities of Durham, Middlesex and Aberdeen as a researcher, lecturer in economic geography and in economic development.

My research interests include economic geography, urban and regional development, public ownership, economic democracy and employment relations.

  More

Less

Andrew Dilley

I grew up on the Kent-East Sussex border near Tunbridge Wells. I read for a BA in Modern History between 1997 and 2000, and an M.St in Historical Research in 2000-2001, both at Wadham College, Oxford. After a year out, I studied for my doctorate at the same institution, finishing in 2006. From September 2006 until August 2008 I lectured in Imperial and Commonwealth History at King's College London. I joined Aberdeen as a Lecturer, securing promotion in 2013.

My research and teaching focus on the history of the British empire and particularly the economics, politics, and culture of the Empire-Commonwealth. I have published particularly on London finance and empire, and am now moving to study business trade and empire, supported by an AHRC Early Career Fellowship on 'Commerce and the Commonwealth'.

  More

Less

Andrew Fagan

Co-Director of Postgraduate Studies, Human Rights Centre, University of Essex

Dr Andrew Fagan (BS.c (Hons.), MA, Ph.D.) has been teaching human rights at Essex since 1998. He has occupied several positions within the Human Rights Centre, including; Deputy Director, Research Director, Director of Academic Studies and is currently Director of Postgraduate Studies.

Andrew has extensive multi-disciplinary teaching experience and interests, spanning the theory and practice of human rights. His research principally focuses upon normative issues in the political philosophy of liberalism and is actively researching in the emerging field of human rights and cultural diversity.

Andrew has taught and lectured upon human rights across the world, including Central Asia, East Asia, Europe, South East Asia and South America. Andrew is actively engaged in supporting the on-going reform process in Myanmar, travelling there regularly to undertake grass-roots capacity building human rights training for groups such as the National League for Democracy and Generation 88 and was one of the very first academics in the world to do so.

In 2013 he was also the very first academic to provide a course of summer school lectures in Kazakhstan. Andrew is an internationally recognised scholar, having published many books and articles, including; Human Rights: Confronting Myths & Misunderstandings (2009) and the Human Rights Atlas (2010). He is currently working on a book entitled Human Rights and Cultural Diversity for Edinburgh University Press.

  More

Less

Andrew George

Andrew George was appointed Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Education and International) on 1 October 2013. He joined Brunel from Imperial College London where he was Professor of Molecular Immunology and Director of the Graduate School and the School of Professional Development.

Andrew George did his first degree at the University of Cambridge, before going on to the Tenovus Laboratories in the University of Southampton to do his PhD with Professor Freda Stevenson, developing a vaccine for B cell lymphoma. He was awarded a Beit Memorial Fellowship and stayed in Southampton for his first postdoctoral period, before going to Dr David Segal’s laboratory in the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Bethesda, USA, where he used recombinant techniques to generate novel antibody molecules. In 1992 he returned to the UK as a lecturer at the Royal Postgraduate Medical School, Hammersmith Hospital, which merged with Imperial College in 1997.

Andrew’s research has sought to understand and manipulate the immune system in order to treat disease, in particular to prevent the rejection of transplanted organs. He has also used mathematical models to understand how the immune system functions. In addition to his research, he has been involved in the ethical conduct and regulation of research. He is currently Chair of the UK’s National Research Ethics Advisors’ Panel and is on the Clinical Trials, Biologicals and Vaccines Expert Advisory Group for the Commission of Human Medicines/MHRA. He is a Governor of Richmond Adult Community College and the John Hampden School.

  More

Less

Andrew Gissimg

Director Enterprise Risk Management, Macquarie University

He is an emergency and risk management expert. Andrew has performed various senior executive roles in the emergency management and social services sectors, including as the Deputy Chief Officer of the Victoria State Emergency Service.

Andrew is an experienced crisis leader having held senior state-wide leadership roles during some of Australia’s most significant natural disasters such as the ‘Pasha Bulka’ Storm (2007), Black Saturday Bushfires (2009), and the Victorian Floods (2010/11). He has been author of state-wide disaster plans, policies and resilience strategies, for which he has received several awards.

Andrews’s significant professional experience is complemented by his academic achievements having completed a Masters of Science (Honours) Degree and a Bachelor of Economics Degree.

  More

Less

Andrew Hughes

Lecturer, Research School of Management, Australian National University

Andrew Hughes is a lecturer in marketing at the Australian National University in Canberra. Prior to his academic career, Andrew worked in marketing management and strategy for some of Australia’s biggest organisations in the financial, industrial and services marketing sectors. His main areas of research include television advertising, branding, sports marketing, political and non-profit marketing, and marketing strategy. He has published numerous papers in political marketing, advertising and branding, and presented his work at conferences in Australia and overseas.

  More

Less

Andrew J. Hoffman

Andy Hoffman is the Holcim (US) Professor of Sustainable Enterprise at the University of Michigan, with joint appointments in the Ross School of Business and the School of Natural Resources & Environment. Andy also serves as the Education Director at the Graham Sustainability Institute.

Professor Hoffman has written extensively about corporate responses to climate change; how the interconnected networks of NGOs and corporations influence change processes; and the underlying cultural values that are engaged when these barriers are overcome. His research uses a sociological perspective to understand the cultural and institutional aspects of environmental issues for organizations. In particular, he focuses on the processes by which environmental issues both emerge and evolve as social, political and managerial issues.

He has published twelve books, which have been translated into five languages. His work has been covered in numerous media outlets, including the New York Times, Scientific American, Time, the Wall Street Journal and National Public Radio. He has served on research committees for the National Academies of Science, the Johnson Foundation, the Climate Group, the China Council for International Cooperation on Environment and Development and the Environmental Defense Fund. Prior to academics, Andy worked for the US Environmental Protection Agency (Region 1), Metcalf & Eddy Environmental Consultants, T&T Construction & Design and the Amoco Corporation.

Andy has worked with organizations in both the public and private sectors. This includes projects with: Accenture LLP, Dow Chemical Co., Environmental Defense Fund, Exxon-Mobil Corp., Holcim (US) Inc., International Finance Corp., Novartis, The Conference Board, The Nature Conservancy, The Southern Company, World Business Council on Sustainable Development, and Yellowstone National Park.

  More

Less

Andrew Jakubowicz

Professor of Sociology, University of Technology Sydney

Andrew Jakubowicz is Professor of Sociology at the University of Technology Sydney. He has an Honours degree in Government from Sydney University and a PhD from UNSW.

Since the early 1970s he has been involved in action research and race relations, and has been centrally involved in the development of materialist theories of cultural diversity. He has taught at universities in the USA, Europe and Asia, and was the foundation director of the Centre for Multicultural Studies at the University of Wollongong. He has published widely on ethnic diversity issues, disability studies and media studies. More recently he has been co-director of the Cosmopolitan Civil Societies Research Key Strength at UTS (2008-2015).

In 1994 he led the research team that produced the book, Racism Ethnicity and the Media (Allen and Unwin), and has has been involved in multimedia documentaries such as Making Multicultural Australia (1999-2004) and The Menorah of Fang Bang Lu (2001-2002). He was historical adviser to the exhibitions on the Jewish communities of Shanghai, at the Sydney Jewish Museum (2001-2002), the National Maritime Museum (2001-2003) and the national travelling exhibition, Crossroads: Shanghai and the Jews of China (2002-2003).

He was foundation chair of the Disability Studies and Research Institute. He chaired the Institute for Cultural Diversity, a national NGO (http://culturaldiversity.net.au) from 2009 to 2012.

He was historical advisor on the SBS series, "Immigration Nation" (2011), and is series advisor on "Once Upon a Time in...", a three season project for Northern Pictures and SBS, of which "Cabramatta" (2012) and "Punchbowl" (2014) have been released. He developed the concept for "The Great Australian Race Riot", a three episode series for SBS made by Essential Media broadcast in 2015.

Graduate research supervision areas include new media and social change, racism and ethnicity, public policy and marginalised minorities. He is current lead Chief Investigator on the ARC Linkage project "Cyber Racism and Community Resilience" with colleagues at Sydney, Western Sydney, Deakin and Monash universities, and in collaboration with the Australian Human Rights commission, VicHealth and the Federation of Ethnic Community Councils of Australia.

"Making Multicultural Australia in the 21st Century", an educational website developed jointly with the Office of the Board of Studies NSW, won the 2005 Best Secondary Educational website category of the annual Excellence in Educational Publishing Awards.

  More

Less

Andrew King

Climate Extremes Research Fellow, University of Melbourne

I'm a Research Fellow at the University of Melbourne interested in climate extremes and their attribution to human-induced climate change.

  More

Less

Andrew Linn

Pro-Vice-Chancellor and Dean of Social Sciences and Humanities, University of Westminster

I joined the University of Westminster in February 2016 as Pro Vice-Chancellor and Dean of Social Sciences and Humanities. I am also Professor of Language, History and Society.

My first degree (at Emmanuel College, Cambridge where I was organ scholar) was in English, followed by a Master's degree in General Linguistics and a PhD in the History of Linguistics.

From 2003 I was Professor of the History of Linguistics at the University of Sheffield. In my time at Sheffield I was successively Head of English Language and Linguistics and Director of Research in the Arts and Humanities. I spent the academic year 2007-2008 working at the University of Bergen on a Leverhulme Fellowship, and in 2012 I was visiting professor at the University of Paris 7-Diderot.

I am a Fellow of the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters (Det Norske Videnskaps-Akademi) and of the Agder Vitenskapsakademi, a strategic reviewer for the Arts and Humanities Research Council and President of the Henry Sweet Society for the History of Linguistic Ideas.

My current research involves projects and publications on the changing status of English in Europe, language policy-making, the experiences of Nordic emigrants, and the history of applied linguistics.

  More

Less

Andrew Maynard

Andrew Maynard is a Professor in the School for the Future of Innovation in Society at Arizona State University, and Director of the Risk Innovation Lab. His research and professional activities focus on risk innovation, and the responsible development and use of emerging technologies. He is especially interested in novel approaches to understanding and addressing risk; effective approaches to developing socially responsive, responsible and beneficial technologies; understanding and responding to the increasingly complex couplings between converging technologies and society; and effective science communication and engagement – particularly through social media. Through the ASU Risk Innovation Lab, he is exploring novel ways of understanding, thinking about and acting on risk from an entrepreneurial and innovation perspective. He is interested in understanding how risk as a “threat to value” shapes evolving risk landscapes around emerging technologies – especially where the value under threat is social, cultural and personal – and how creativity and serendipity can reveal new approaches to navigating these landscapes.

Andrew is widely published in the academic press and in public media. His peer review papers stretch from physics and toxicology to risk perception, governance, and policy. He also contributes to a regular column in the journal Nature Nanotechnology (where he writes on emerging ideas and research around nanotechnology and risk), and writes for the column “Edge of Innovation” on the news and commentary website The Conversation. In addition, he directs and produces the YouTube science education channel “Risk Bites”.

Andrew’s science training is in physics – specializing in nanoparticle analysis – and for many years he conducted and led research on aerosol exposure in occupational settings. In the early 2000’s he became increasingly involved in guiding US federal initiatives supporting nanotechnology research and development, and in addressing potential risks. In 2005 he became Chief Science Advisor for the Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies (and later the Synthetic Biology Project) at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, and for five years helped inform national and global initiatives addressing the responsible development of nanotechnology. Over this period, he became increasingly interested in science communication and science policy, and began working closely with academics, policy makers, industry, non-government organizations, and journalists, on science-informed decision making. This interest continued between 2010 - 2015 as Director of the University of Michigan Risk Science Center, and Chair of the Environmental Health Sciences Department. In 2015 he joined the faculty of the School for the Future of Innovation in Society at Arizona State University to continue his work and collaborations on socially responsible, responsible and beneficial research and development.

In the course of his work, Andrew has testified before congressional committees, has served on National Academy panels, and has worked closely with organizations such as the World Economic Forum and the International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI) that promote public-private partnerships. He is currently co-chair of the World Economic Forum Global Agenda Council on Nanotechnology, and on the Board of Trustees of ILSI North America. He is also a member of the National Academies of Science Committee on the Science of Science Communication, and advises the science education/engagement program “I’m a Scientist”. While at the University of Michigan he was involved with the innovative science communication training program RELATE, and continues to serve as an advisor to the initiative. In 2015 he was awarded the Society of Toxicology Public Communication Award.

  More

Less

Andrew Monaghan

Scientist Research Applications Laboratory in Climate Science & Applications Program, University Corporation for Atmospheric Research

Andrew Monaghan employs computer models to study weather and climate at regional scales, with an emphasis on climate change, and the impacts of climate on human health. He is currently involved in a project to study the influence of climate on human plague transmission Uganda, where factors such as temperature and precipitation play an important role in determining risk. He is also interested in Antarctic climate variability. Monaghan works in NCAR’s Research Applications Laboratory.

  More

Less

Andrew Norton

I've worked at the Open University since 1992 and am now Professor of Astrophysics Education in the Department of Physical Sciences. I'm a former Vice President of the Royal Astronomical Society and am Editor-in-Chief of the journal Astronomical Review.

My research interests are in various aspects of time domain astrophysics with a current focus on stellar photometry from wide field surveys to investigate close binary stars. I carry out research on all sorts of variable stars, including white dwarfs, neutron stars and black holes, and I edit the International Exoplanet Newsletter. I am co-lead for the materials and learning objects for the PLATO Education and Public Outreach Coordination Office in support of ESA's mission to discover rocky exoplanets in Earth-like orbits around Sun-like stars.

I am passionate about outreach and public engagement - being both a STEMnet ambassador and a public engagement ambassador for the National Coordinating Centre for Public Engagement. I wrote a story book about Exoplanets for young children called "Oogle-Flip and the planet adventure". I also co-wrote the series of "60 second adventures in Astronomy" and am a frequent Academic Consultant for OU/BBC astronomy co-productions,

My Erdos-Bacon-Sabbath number is 13.

  More

Less

Andrew Pollard

Professor of Paediatric Infection and Immunity, University of Oxford

Current research activities include clinical trials of new and improved vaccines for children and adults, surveillance of invasive bacterial diseases and penumococcal vaccine impact in children in Nepal, studies of cellular and humoral immune responses to glycoconjugate and typhoid vaccines, and development of a serogroup B meningococcal vaccine.
ANDREW J POLLARD, FRCPCH PhD FMedSci, is Professor of Paediatric Infection and Immunity at the University of Oxford, Director of the Oxford Vaccine Group, Fellow of St Cross College and Honorary Consultant Paediatrician at the Children’s Hospital, Oxford, UK. He obtained his medical degree at St Bartholomew’s Hospital Medical School, University of London in 1989 and trained in Paediatrics at Birmingham Children’s Hospital, UK, specialising in Paediatric Infectious Diseases at St Mary’s Hospital, London, UK and at British Columbia Children’s Hospital, Vancouver, Canada. He obtained his PhD at St Mary’s Hospital, London, UK in 1999 studying immunity to Neisseria meningitidis in children and proceeded to work on anti-bacterial innate immune responses in children in Canada before returning to his current position at the University of Oxford, UK in 2001. He received the Bill Marshall award of the European Society for Paediatric Infectious Disease (ESPID) in 2013 for his contribution to the specialty and the ESPID Distinguished Award for Education & Communication in 2015.

He chaired the UK’s National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) meningitis guidelines development group, and the NICE topic expert group developing quality standards for management of meningitis and meningococcal septicaemia. He chairs the UK Department of Health’s Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation and the European Medicines Agency scientific advisory group on vaccines and is a member of WHO’s SAGE. His research includes the design, development and clinical evaluation of vaccines including those for meningococcal disease and enteric fever and leads studies using a human challenge model of (para)typhoid. He has a particular interest in the development of B cell immunity in early childhood. He runs surveillance for invasive bacterial diseases and studies the impact of pneumococcal vaccines in children in Nepal and leads a project on burden and transmission of typhoid in Nepal, Bangladesh and Malawi. He has supervised 23 PhD students and his publications include over 300 manuscripts and books on various topics in paediatrics and infectious diseases.

  More

Less

Andrew Schmulow

Andy was admitted to a BA Honours LLB in the University of the Witwatersrand, and a PhD in the University of Melbourne. He is an Advocate of the High Court of South Africa, and the Principal of Clarity Prudential Regulatory Consulting, Pty Ltd. He is also a former Senior Research Associate in the School of Law, University of Melbourne. He is currently a Visiting Researcher in the Oliver Schreiner School of Law, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, and in the Centre for International Trade, Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul. From July 2016 he will take up a position as a Senior Lecturer in the Faculty of Law, in The University of Western Australia, Perth.

You can access his research at
http://ssrn.com/author=2352825
https://wits.academia.edu/DrAndySchmulow
https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Dr_Andy_Schmulow

  More

Less

Andrew Smith

Reader in Tourism and Events, University of Westminster

I am a Reader in Tourism and Events and have been at the University of Westminster since 2004. Previously, I held lectureships at the University of Kent and at Sheffield Hallam University. I read Geography at Cambridge University in the mid 1990s and then moved to Sheffield where I studied for a PhD in a programme of research entitled 'Reimaging the City'. This PhD was funded jointly by both Sheffield Hallam University and the University of Sheffield.

I currently lead the MA elective in Mega-Events and the MA Dissertation module. I also undertake research supervision at MA and PhD levels. I lead two undergraduate modules on the BA Tourism and Events programmes - Eventful Cities and Comparative Study. I also lead the annual final year field trip to Malta.

Over the past five years I have written on various urban themes. My first book 'Events and Urban Regeneration' was published by Routledge in 2012; and my second 'Events in the City: Using Public Spaces as Event Venues' was published by Routledge in 2016. My research has also been published in leading journals including: Urban Studies, European Planning Studies, European Urban and Regional Studies, Annals of Tourism Research and Tourism Geographies.

There are three main strands to my work. The first is events, in particular their role as tools for the regeneration and revitalisation of cities. The second is place image, drawing heavily on my doctoral work. The third is urban tourism, especially the role of iconic projects and monumental urbanism in tourism. This work is focused mainly on UK cities, but I have also published research on Oslo, Barcelona and Valletta.

  More

Less

Andrew Smith

I teach about international business and organizational change. My core research interests centre on the evolution of business and financial institutions, the development of international business, corporate governance, and political economy. Another strand of my research looks at the impact of socially-constructed identities on firms. An additional research area is the relationship between business and the natural environment. Empirically, my research is on firms that have operated in the North Atlantic region and in East Asia. My research is informed by diverse theories, including concepts taken from strategic management, behavioural economics, post-colonial theory, International Political Economy, and Austrian economics. My preferred research methods are qualitative and include the use of corporate archives.

My first book, which was published in 2008, was on the role of British financiers in the genesis of the Canadian constitution. This book was an outgrowth of my PhD work, which was conducted at a Canadian university. My second book was a co-edited collection on the history of entrepreneurship in Canada. My third book, which was published in 2014, is an edited collection on globalization and Canadian business that aimed to use to historical evidence to test various claims about optimum policy mix for nations seeking to manage their relationship to the global economy. My more recent research has included articles on the history of Unilever and HSBC, race relations within multinational firms, the evolution of cashless payment technologies in Hong Kong, and the relationship between corporate governance and contemporary debates about economic inequality. I have also published articles and book chapters on topics such as the taxation, fisheries regulation, ethnicity and international capital flows, race and business, entrepreneurship, and banking regulation history. I am currently editing a book on the impact of the First World War on the strategies of international firms. It will be published by Routledge in early 2016.

  More

Less

Andrew Stewart

John Bray Professor of Law, University of Adelaide

Andrew is the John Bray Professor of Law. His main interests lie in employment law and workplace relations, contract law and intellectual property. His most recent publications include: the fifth edition of his popular text Stewart's Guide to Employment Law; the fifth edition of Intellectual Property in Australia, written with Philip Griffith, Judith Bannister and Adam Liberman; and Multinational Human Resource Management and the Law, co-authored with a group of distinguished international scholars.

Besides working as a consultant with the national law firm Piper Alderman, Andrew has provided expert advice to the International Labour Organisation, to Federal and State governments in Australia and to a wide range of other organisations. His recent work has included a ground-breaking study of the prevalence, nature and regulation of unpaid work experience, commissioned by the Fair Work Ombudsman and co-authored by Rosemary Owens; and a major research report on equal remuneration claims for the Fair Work Commission, along with Robyn Layton QC and Meg Smith. Prior to that, he advised the federal government on the drafting and structure of the Fair Work legislation.

Andrew is the President of the Australian Labour Law Association, a fellow of the Australian Academy of Law and an Editor of the Australian Journal of Labour Law. He has previously been Chair of the Committee of Australian Law Deans and President of the Industrial Relations Society of South Australia. Before taking up his current post he worked at the University of Sydney and at Flinders University, where he was Dean of Law from 1994-1997.

  More

Less

Andrew Street

Andrew Street is a Professor of Health Economics and Director of the Health Policy team in the Centre for Health Economics and Director of the Economics of Social and Health Care Research Unit (ESHCRU), a joint collaboration with the Personal Social Services Research Unit (PSSRU) at the London School of Economics and the University of Kent. He is an editor of the Journal of Health Economics, and currently serves as a board member on the NIHR Health Services and Delivery Research programme Commissioning Board Researcher-led (since 2009) and the Norwegian HSR Board (since 2011), and as chair of the Welsh Health Economics Support Service Advisory Group. He is an external affiliate to the Department of Business and Economics at the University of Southern Denmark.

Andrew's research covers measurement of health system productivity, evaluation of activity based funding mechanisms, analysis of organisational efficiency, and critical appraisal of health policy.

He has a MSc in Health Economics (1990), a MA in Public Administration and Public Policy (2000) and a PhD in Economics (2002), all awarded by the University of York. After completing his MSc, Andrew spent three years in Australia working at the National Centre for Health Program Evaluation, Monash University and the Victorian Department of Health and Community Services. This was followed by a five-year spell with the York Health Economics Consortium. He joined the Centre for Health Economics in April 1999. From 1999-2003 he held a special training fellowship awarded by the Medical Research Council and Northern and Yorkshire Region. In 2005 he worked part time in the Delivery Analytical Team in the English Department of Health.

  More

Less

Andrew W. Moore

Dean, School of Computer Science, Carnegie Mellon University

I am the Dean of the School of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University. My background is in statistical machine learning, artificial intelligence, robotics, and statistical computation for large volumes of data. I love algorithms and statistics. In the case of robotics, which I also love, I only have expertise in decision and control algorithms. I suck at hardware and mechanical design. When I stand near a robot, it breaks.

I have worked in the areas of robot control, manufacturing, reinforcement learning, algorithms for astrophysics, algorithms for detection and surveillance of terror threats, internet advertising, internet click-through prediction, ecommerce, and logistics for same day delivery.

I am passionate about the impact of technology (algorithms, cloud architectures, statistics, robotics, language technologies, machine learning, computational biology, artificial intelligence and software development processes) on the future of society. We are lucky to live in such an exciting time of change. I am adamant that the Pittsburgh region in general, and Carnegie Mellon more specifically, are right in the center of all this change.

  More

Less

Andrew White

I am currently an Associate Professor of Digital Media & Creative Industries in the School of International Communications and Research Director for the Faculty of Arts & Education at the University of Nottingham Ningbo China, where I have worked since 2007. In 2015 I assumed the interim directorship of the AHRC Centre for Digital Copyright and IP Research in China. I have published numerous journal articles and book chapters on digital media, the creative industries and Northern Irish politics. My first book, Digital Media and Society: transforming economics, politics and social practices, was released in paperback, hardback and e-book by Palgrave Macmillan in 2014 and a Portuguese translation will be published soon.

  More

Less

Andrew Wilson

Andrew Wilson is a Senior Lecturer in Criminology. Andrew's research interests include: drugs (all aspects), subcultures and gangs, violence (all aspects including terrorism, state sponsored and genocide), inequality and crime, criminological theory, young people, crime and justice, social control and policing.

His book Northern soul: music, drugs and subcultural identity was published in 2007.

  More

Less

Andy Martin

Lecturer, Department of French, University of Cambridge

French philosophers. He teaches papers from 1789 onwards.

His latest book is Reacher Said Nothing: Lee Child and the Making of Make Me, in which he shadows the author Lee Child like a literary private eye in a yearlong investigation of what it takes to make fiction’s hottest hero hit the page running. https://www.amazon.com/Reacher-Said-Nothing-Child-Making/dp/1101965452

The author of Waiting for Bardot (Faber), Napoleon the Novelist (Polity), and The Knowledge of Ignorance (CUP), he was a 2009-10 Fellow of the Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers, New York. His also wrote The Boxer and the Goalkeeper: Sartre vs Camus (Simon and Schuster). Extracts or adjacent articles can be found here:
http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/books/features/the-extract-the-boxer-and-the-goalkeeper-sartre-vs-camus-7785718.html
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/books/bookreviews/9316768/Sartre-Camus-and-a-woman-called-Wanda.html
http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/07/14/sartre-and-camus-in-new-york/

He is undertaking a Norman Mailer fellowship and recently wrote a meditation on the vexed problem of book titles http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/09/01/is-this-title-ok/

  More

Less

Andy Williams

Lecturer (teaching and research), Cardiff University

Andy Williams is a lecturer at Cardiff School of Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies. He was previously the RCUK Research Fellow in Risk, Health and Science Communication (2008-10). He has a number of research interests which intersect journalism studies and cultural studies. His current major research interests relate to news sources and the influence of public relations on the UK media, especially in the area of science, health and environment news.

Andy has provided expert opinion and advice to a number of government bodies, media groups, and professional associations including the BBC, the Department of Business, Innovation and Skills, the Expert Group on Science and the Media, the National Union of Journalists, and the Welsh Assembly’s Broadcasting Subcommittee.

He regularly contributes to the UK national and regional press and broadcast media (recent media input includes Times Higher Education, Nature News, the New Statesman, national BBC Breakfast News, the Guardian Unlimited, Press Gazette, OpenDemocracy, and BBC Wales television and radio news).

In addition to this he is committed to disseminating research findings in a variety of other contexts:
- he regularly carries out media training workshops across the UK with scientists who want to gain a deeper insight into how science journalism works;
- he has formed partnerships with Bryncelynnog Comprehensive in Beddau (his old school), and Treorchy Comprehensive in the Rhondda, where he speaks to media studies and science pupils about his research; and
- he has contributed lectures in collaboration with the University of the Third Age (U3A).

  More

Less

Angela Daly

Dr Angela Daly recently joined QUT Law as Vice Chancellor’s Research Fellow. She is a socio-legal scholar of technology with expertise in intellectual property, human rights (privacy and free expression), and competition and regulation. She is also the author of ‘Socio-Legal Aspects of the 3D Printing Revolution’ (2016, Palgrave), based on her postdoctoral research at the Swinburne Institute for Social Research and ‘Private Power, Online Information Flows and EU Law’ (2017, Hart), based on her doctoral research at the European University Institute.

  More

Less

Angelina Russo

Angelina Russo is the inaugural Professor of Cultural Practice in the Faculty of Arts and Design at the University of Canberra. Her research focuses on explorations in the changing media landscape and their applications to cultural communication. She is a co-founder and Director of Museum3 (www.museum3.net) and in her spare time, runs a tiny micro-business where she designs and hand-manufactures high visibility knit cyclewear (www.culturecycle.org)

  More

Less

1 2 3 4 
  • Market Data
Close

Welcome to EconoTimes

Sign up for daily updates for the most important
stories unfolding in the global economy.