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Brenda Volling

Professor of Psychology, University of Michigan

Dr. Volling studies the social and emotional development of infants and young children, and the role of family relationships in facilitating children’s developmental outcomes. She is particularly interested in the role of fathers, and the development of early sibling relationships. Her current research focuses on the transition period following the birth of a baby sibling and the older child’s adjustment after the birth (the Family Transitions Study).

Dr. Volling is currently Director and Research Professor at the Center for Human Growth and Development and Professor of Psychology at the University of Michigan. Her research focuses on the social and emotional development of infants, parent-infant interaction, and the role of family relationships in facilitating children’s developmental outcomes. She has conducted extensive research on the role of fathers for infant development and is one of the leading experts on the development of infant-father attachment relationships. She is the Principal Investigator of the Family Transitions Study (FTS), a longitudinal investigation of changes in the firstborn’s adjustment and family functioning after the birth of a second child, which has received funding from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) and the Fetzer Foundation. She was the recipient of an Independent Scientist Award from NICHD and received a Faculty Recognition Award for outstanding research, teaching and service at the University of Michigan. She recently received the MICHR Distinguished Clinical and Translational Research Mentor Award. She is also a Fellow of the Association for Psychological Science. Dr. Volling received her Ph.D. in Human Development and Family Studies at Penn State University.

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Brendan Canavan

My research investigates tourism, marketing and branding. I am particularly interested in the role, impacts and sustainability of tourism in small islands. Current research projects are interested in developing theoretical understandings of tourism.

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Brendan Gogarty

LLB/PhD (UTAS), GLDP/LLM (ANU), Barrister & Solicitor. Chief Editor Journal of Law, Information & Science.

Research interests include International Law, Constitutional Law, Jurisprudence, Science, Technology and the law.

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Brendan Moore

PhD Researcher, Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research, University of East Anglia

Brendan Moore is a PhD researcher affiliated with the Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research at the University of East Anglia. His research focuses on the EU Emissions Trading System (EU ETS) and its political effects on European climate change policy. He holds an MSc in Nature, Society, and Environmental Policy from the University of Oxford and a BSc in Economics from the University of Florida.

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Brendan Simms

Professor in the History of International Relations, University of Cambridge
Brendan Peter Simms is an Irish historian and Professor of the History of International Relations in the Department of Politics and International Studies at the University of Cambridge. Simms studied at Trinity College Dublin, where he was elected a scholar in history in 1986, before completing his doctoral dissertation, Anglo-Prussian relations, 1804-1806: The Napoleonic Threat, at Cambridge under the supervision of Professor Tim Blanning in 1993. A Fellow of Peterhouse, he lectures and leads seminars on international history since 1945.

Simms's research focuses on the history of European foreign policy. He has written a variety of books and articles on this subject, including Unfinest Hour: Britain and the Destruction of Bosnia (2001) and Three Victories and a Defeat: The Rise and Fall of the First British Empire, 1714-1783 (2007). His overarching book, Europe: The Struggle for Supremacy, 1453 to the Present, was favorably reviewed by The Telegraph and the New Statesman.

His latest book is Britain’s Europe: A Thousand Years of Conflict and Cooperation (2016).

In addition to his academic work, he also serves as the president of The Henry Jackson Society, which advocates the view that supporting and promoting liberal democracy and liberal interventionism should be an integral part of Western foreign policy.

He is President of the Project for Democratic Union, a Munich-based student-organised think tank.

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Brendan Skip Mark

Professor of political science, University of Rhode Island
Brendan Skip Mark joined the URI political science department in 2018. His research explores the intersections between human rights, political economy, collective dissent, and empirical methodology. He tries to unpack the determinants and consequences of: compliance with International Organization agreements, repression, labor rights, violent and non-violent protest, migration and remittances, development, economic crisis, and economic and social rights. He is particularly interested in how measurement and modeling choices affect what we know about these relationships and how an understanding of history and other disciplines can improve our knowledge of them.

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Brett J. Baker

Assistant Professor of Marine Science, University of Texas at Austin

Microorganisms are key mediators in nearly all of the planet’s elemental cycles. However, our understanding of the ecological roles of many groups of microbes has been hampered by low-resolution analytical approaches to studying the staggering diversity present in nature. As a result the tree of life is full of branches, which remain undiscovered, and those, which have only been identified in single-gene sequencing surveys (Baker and Dick, 2013). This is a fundamental gap in our understanding of biology. Filling in the genomic gaps in the tree of life will provide a rich context to understand the evolution of life on the planet and will provide us with a genetic understanding of how microbial communities drive biogeochemical cycles.

Recent advances in DNA sequencing technologies and computational analyses have made it possible to reconstruct the genomes and transcriptomes of uncultured natural populations (Baker et al. 2010, 2012 and 2013). I have been involved in the development (Dick et al. 2009) and implementation of environmental omics since the beginning. I was involved in the first metaproteomic study of a microbial community (Ram et al. 2005) and have been using these approaches to track fine-scale evolutionary processes (Denef et al. 2010). Using these techniques I discovered deeply branching, novel groups of microbes (Archaea referred to as ARMAN) that are close to the predicted lower size limit of an organism (Baker et al. 2006). Obtaining complete genomes of the ARMAN phylum revealed that they have signatures of inter-species interactions and form connections to other species in nature (Baker et al. 2010).

More recently, my laboratory has reconstructed the genomes of hundreds of widespread, uncultured sediment microbes to understand how ecological roles are partitioned in these microbial communities. Many of the genomes belong to phyla which have no previous genomic representation and discovered three new groups of bacteria they play important roles in the global carbon cycle (Baker et al. 2015; Lazar, et al, Environ Micro). One of the new branches for which we have obtained several genomes for is a deeply branched member (Thorarchaeota) (Seitz et al. 2016). These genomes have provided rich insights into the evolutionary histories of life on the planet and we have been able to map the flow of carbon and energy, a microbial food web, through sediments with unprecedented detail (Baker et al. 2015).

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Brian Gendreau

Brian Gendreau is a Richardson Fellow, Clinical Professor of Finance, and Director of the Latin American Business Environment program at the University of Florida. Previously Brian was a market strategist at ING, Heckman Global Advisors, and Salomon Smith Barney, and head of emerging market economics at JP Morgan. Before that he was an economist with the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia. Brian has a PhD in from the Wharton School and a MA in international relations from Johns Hopkins SAIS. He has appeared frequently on CNBC, Fox Business television, and Bloomberg television.

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Brian Klaas

LSE Fellow in Comparative Politics, London School of Economics and Political Science

Dr. Brian Klaas is a Fellow in Comparative Politics at the London School of Economics. He focuses on democracy, global politics, political violence, voting, and elections. Klaas is the author of the forthcoming book: "The Despot's Accomplice: How the West is Aiding & Abetting the Decline of Democracy."

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Brian McNair

Brian McNair is an academic researcher and media commentator. He writes on a wide range of topics including journalism, political communication, popular culture and mediated sexuality. His most recent books are Porno? Chic! (Routledge, 2013), Journalists In Film (Edinburgh University Press, 2010) and An Introduction To Political Communication (5th edition, Routledge, 2011). He is a regular contributor to press, online and broadcast media in Australia and overseas, including ABC News 24, Sky News, BBC World, and many other news outlets. His books have been translated into fifteen languages, including Russian, Japanese, Mandarin, Spanish, Greek, Polish and Albanian.

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Brian Whitacre

Associate Professor and Extension Economist, Oklahoma State University

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Bridget Backhaus

Senior Lecturer in Journalism and Media Studies, Griffith University
Dr Bridget Backhaus is media studies scholar interested in the role of community and alternative media in social and environmental change. A former community radio journalist and producer, her research explores the intersections of voice, listening, identity, and participation within community media.

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Brigitta Olubas

Professor of English, School of the Arts and Media, UNSW Sydney

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Bronwyn Parkin

Adjunct lecturer, Linguistics, University of Adelaide, University of Adelaide
My background is in education, specifically in the area of language and literacy and pedagogy. I have spent most of my professional life working in Aboriginal education, from remote to metropolitan, and from Junior Primary to tertiary.
My research interest is the development of academic language with educationally marginalised students: Indigenous, English as a Second Language, and low-socioceconomic students. I draw on three theoretical fields: systemic functional linguistics (Halliday), sociocultural theory (Vygotsky), and educational sociology (Bernstein).

PhD in Linguistics, University of Adelaide (Pedagogy for marginalised students)
M.Ed (Language and Literacy) University of South Australia
Literacy consultant in South Australian public schools, and NT remote Indigenous schools
Vice president, Primary English Teaching Association of Australia (PETAA)
Author: Teaching with Intent 1 and 2, Teaching the language of Climate Change Science
Formerly project officer, Aboriginal Education Unit and the Literacy Secretariat, SA Dept for Ed

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Brooke Macnamara

Assistant Professor of Psychology, Case Western Reserve University

Brooke Macnamara is an assistant professor of psychology, and she specializes in the psychology of expertise, among others. For her first piece for The Conversation, she is writing about sports and children.

And she has news for all parents who think they can engineer the next Tiger Woods.

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Bruce Morley

Bruce joined the department in February 2006, having previously been an Economics lecturer in the SMB at the University of Wales Aberystwyth for about 10 years.

His PhD, Masters and degree were from the Department of Economics at Loughborough University.

Bruce has a general interest in sport, which has led to doing some research into the economics of cricket, such as the effect of winning the toss. He also has an interest in development economics, especially the role of trade on economic growth in LDCs. Otherwise his research interests are in international macroeconomics, particularly models of exchange rate determination. In addition, he is also interested in the economics of the EU, especially the effects of monetary union.

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Bruce Mutsvairo

Dr. Bruce Mutsvairo was a journalist at the Associated Press bureau in Amsterdam, The Netherlands for fours years. Since 2013, he has been at Northumbria, conducting cross-disciplinary research in social media, citizen engagement and political participation.

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Bryan Clair

Dr. Clair's research areas include topology and graph theory. He has been a faculty member at Saint Louis University since 2000.

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Bryan Lessard

Postdoctoral Research Fellow, CSIRO
Dr Bryan Lessard was first introduced to the curious world of flies during his undergraduate studies at the University of Wollongong, learning about the behaviour, classification and applications of the winged insects to forensic entomology. With his interest peaked, he enrolled in a PhD at the Australian National University in Canberra to continue his research on flies, this time describing over 18 species new to science and using DNA to solve the mystery behind the evolution of gondwanan horse flies. In the hopes of generating buzz in taxonomy, the science of naming and classifying organisms, he described a horse fly with a golden abdomen after the performer Beyoncé, 'Plinthina beyonceae'. This “bootylicious” ambassador for biodiversity became a viral sensation and sparked a global conversation on the importance of flies. Dr Lessard now works as a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Australian National Insect Collection at CSIRO in Canberra. Here he continues to research the evolution of soldier flies, most famous for the black soldier fly 'Hermetia illucens' that powers compost bins and could become the next superfood of the 21st century.

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Bryan W. Van Norden

Professor of Chinese Thought and History, Vassar College

Bryan W. Van Norden is a leading expert on Chinese thought. In addition to being a prolific author and translator, he has been praised as one of the 300 best college or university professors in the US by the Princeton Review. Prof. Van Norden teaches at Vassar College, and has also lectured and held visiting positions at leading universities in China. He is available for presentations, articles, or consultations on Chinese history, philosophy, and current affairs, including but not limited to Confucianism, Daoism (Taoism), Buddhism, and their contemporary relevance.

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Bryce Stewart

Bryce is a marine ecologist and fisheries biologist whose work has ranged from temperate estuaries to tropical coral reefs and the deep-sea. The central thread in his research has been to gain an increased understanding of the factors regulating marine populations and communities so as to ensure their sustainable utilisation. His work on deep-sea fishes was among the first to demonstrate their extreme longevity, and on coral reefs he provided new evidence for mechanisms of community regulation of prey fish by predators. More recently his focus has been on how to improve the management of fisheries through the use of predictive recruitment models, marine protected areas and stock enhancement. Bryce has also been especially active in promoting the sale and consumption of sustainable seafood by working with everyone from government ministers to fishermen, restaurants and supermarket chains.

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Bulent Gökay

Professor of International Relations, Keele University

My research and publications cover two interrelated strands- the first relates to the social and political history of the post-WWI settlements; and the second to contemporary issues and political economy of resources in Eurasia. Through my work I have set out to marry macro historical analysis with contemporary micro dynamics of political economy by employing a 'globalist' perspective.

Since the outbreak of global financial and economic crisis in 2007-08, I have been writing on the historical/ long-term origins of the crisis and the overall structure of the global economy, using a particular perspective which can be described as the ‘global shift model’. My recent book, The Fall of the US Empire: Global Fault-Lines and the Shifting Imperial Order (co-authored with Vassilis Fouskas), Pluto Press, 2012, is a good example to this, analysing the changing balance of global power, the hegemonic shift from the global "West" to the global "East/ South". The decline of the US hegemony, the rise of China and other Emerging Powers, and the nature of contemporary global economy are issues of paramount importance for understanding HOW THE WORLD WORKS, the current crisis and Where Do We Go from Here.

I joined Keele in 1996 from Wolfson College, Cambridge, where I had been a postdoctoral Research Fellow for the previous three years. Before coming to Keele, I taught at the Birkbeck College-London, University of North London, and at the University of Cambridge. I am the founder and the Managing Editor of the Journal of Global Faultlines.

My books include The Politics of Caspian Oil by Palgrave in 2001; Eastern Europe Since 1970 by Longman in 2005 (second edition in 2006), The New American Imperialism: Bush's War on Terror and Blood for Oil, co-authored with Vassilis K. Fouskas, published by Greenwood Publishing Group in 2005; SOVIET EASTERN POLICY AND TURKEY, 1920-1991 by Routledge in 2006, Politics of Oil – A Survey, by Routledge in 2006; Unholy Alliance: Muslims and Communists in Post-Transition States (with Ben Fowkes) by Routledge, 2011; The Fall of the US Empire. , Global Fault-Lines and the Shifting Imperial Order, co-authored with Vassilis K. Fouskas, published by Pluto Press, June 2012. (GlobalFaultlines- interview)

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