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Petrina Coventry

Professor, University of Adelaide

Petrina Coventry is Industry Professor and Director of Development with Adelaide University Faculty of Professions and Business school.

Petrina has spent over twenty years working in Asia, the United States and Europe performing global leadership roles with The General Electric Company, The Coca Cola Company, Proctor and Gamble and Santos Ltd. She has worked across multiple industry sectors including energy, oil and gas, education, fast moving consumer goods and financial services.

Her work in the area of ethics and governance, transformation and change, organization design, human capital planning and policy has led to increased involvement with governments, industry associations and consulting groups across the Asian region.

Petrina is an ethicist by background and has been appointed as a Fellow of the Australian Institute of Company Directors, a Vincent Fairfax Fellow, and a Fellow of the Australian Human Resource Institute. She is a Non-executive director of AHRI, a Non-executive director of the Australasian Association of Philosophy, and a Non-executive director of Beston Global Food Company Ltd.

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Petya Ventsislavova Petrova

Senior Lecturer in Psychology, Nottingham Trent University
Petya holds the position of Senior Lecturer in the Department of Psychology at Nottingham Trent University. Specialising in Transport Psychology, her applied research primarily focuses on hazard perception in driving. She has published a number of journal articles and for academic and non-academic audiences.
Petya is dedicated to improving hazard perception and prediction skills in both UK and international drivers. She collaborates closely with various government departments to identify effective strategies for tailoring hazard perception testing to suit the specific requirements of individual countries and their driving evaluation processes. Furthermore, Petya evaluates the development of training resources designed to encourage the safe implementation of micromobility.

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Phaik Yeong Cheah

Professor of Global Health, University of Oxford
Phaik Yeong Cheah is a bioethicist and Professor of Global Health at the Mahidol Oxford Tropical Medicine Research Unit, University of Oxford

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Phelim Kine

Adjunct professor, Roosevelt Public Policy Institute at Hunter College, City University of New York

Phelim Kine is an adjunct faculty member in the Roosevelt House Public Policy Institute at Hunter College at the City University of New York. He lectures on human rights developments and challenges in Asia.

Mr. Kine is also Deputy Asia Director at Human Rights Watch in New York where he supervises the organization’s work on Indonesia, Pakistan, Afghanistan and the Philippines.

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Phil Godsiff

Phil Godsiff is a Senior Research Fellow at the Surrey Centre for the Digital Economy, (CoDE), part of the Business School at the University of Surrey, UK. CoDE was formed to study the impact of digital technology on business, the economy, and society. Working closely with businesses, CoDE adopts a multi-disciplinary approach to analyzing the broad economic, organizational, and sociological changes brought about by the advance and spread of digital technology. His research interests include the effect of developments in the digital economy on industries, such as financial services, where existing business models may no longer be appropriate, and where new forms of currency and organization, such as crypto- and personal currencies, have the potential to emerge leading to profound effects on the economy and wider society.

He is an Investigator on a recently awarded UK Research Council grant titled “CREDIT”, which is examining the nature and practices of these crypto currencies, and will be defining the future research agenda. The main themes of the research are to explore the effect of these “currencies” on the digital transformation of business models, and to clarify issues around governance, standards and regulation. He took part in ministerial roundtable discussions at the UK Treasury after the UK Chancellor’s 2015 Budget announcement of an expanded research programme into Digital and Crypto Currencies.

He was a member of the expert panel comprising practitioners and academics which advised Sir Mark Walport, the UK Government Chief Scientific Officer, during his preparation of his report “Distributed Ledger Technology: beyond blockchain” published in January 2016. Phil contributed the chapter on disruptive potential which explored the way blockchain technology might spark the next industrial revolution, and the implications for the economy and society.

He holds an M.A. in Economics from Cambridge University, and a PhD in Management from Exeter University. He received his PhD in 2013 with a study on “wicked problems”, (those without a rational solution), and how they impacted the operations of a government agency. He is a Fellow of the Institute of Chartered Accountants, and spent 30 years working at a senior level in in the Financial Services industry.

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Phil Lewis

Professor of Economics, University of Canberra

Prof Phil Lewis is the Director of the Centre for Labour Market Research (CLMR) and Professor of Economics at the University of Canberra. Phil is among the best-known economists in the area of employment, education and training in Australia and is the author of over 100 journal articles, books and book chapters. Apart from a distinguished academic career he has worked in government and has produced a number of major reports for the private and public sectors. He has an extensive track record of economic analysis and econometric analysis. He has over 30 years experience of management of research projects in universities and in government research organisations such as BLMR and ABARE. He is Past National President of the Economic Society of Australia, Past President of the Western Australian and Canberra branches of the Society and in 2008 was made Honorary Fellow of the Society for his contribution to the economics profession.

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Phil McNally

Research Fellow in Electricity Markets, UCL
Research Fellow at University College London focusing on electricity markets and the reforms required to accelerate the transition from fossil fuels to a low-carbon system. Passionate about developing pragmatic, radical policy solutions to drive the transition to a sustainable future. Also interested in the politics of climate action and how solutions can underpin a progressive society that benefits all.

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Phil Taylor

Siemens Professor of Energy Systems, Newcastle University

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Phil Tomlinson

Phil Tomlinson is Professor of Industrial Strategy and Deputy Director of the Centre for Governance, Regulation & Industrial Strategy (CGR&IS) in the School of Management at the University of Bath. His research explores the interplay between economic governance, innovation, regional development and place-based industrial strategy. He has published widely and extensively, with over 80 career research publications in leading academic journals, books and book chapters, industry reports and media outlets. Professor Tomlinson has held several external appointments including with the UK All- Party Parliamentary Manufacturing Group (APMG), the Independent Local Industrial Strategy Review Panel for Swindon and Wiltshire LEP (SWLEP) and he is currently a member of the West of England’s Skills Advisory Panel (SAP). He is an Editor for the journal Competition and Change, and he is the Policy Debates Editor at Regional Studies.

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Philip Boyd

Professor of Marine Science, Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies, University of Tasmania
After graduating with a PhD in Marine Microbial Ecology from the Queen’s University of Belfast (Ireland), I commenced my career as a postdoctoral researcher at Plymouth Marine Laboratory (UK) where I was a part of the seminal Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (JGOFS). This led to a four year postdoctoral position at the School of Oceanography (University of British Columbia, Canada), followed by an appointment as a Phytoplankton Ecologist with the National Institute of Water and Atmosphere (NIWA, New Zealand). In New Zealand, I established the NIWA Centre for Chemical and Physical Oceanography – based at the Chemistry Department, University of Otago, Dunedin. In 2013, I took up my current appointment as a Professor of Marine Biogeochemistry at the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS), University of Tasmania (Australia). I currently lead an ecological project “Biological Responses” within the Ocean Carbon and Ecosystems programme of the Antarctic Climate and Ecosystems (ACE) Co-operative Research Centre (CRC).

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Philip Conaghan

Director, Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine, University of Leeds
Professor Philip Conaghan MBBS PhD FRACP FRCP is Director of the NIHR Leeds Biomedical Research Centre and until recently was also Director of the Leeds Institute of Rheumatic and Musculoskeletal Medicine (a EULAR Centre of Excellence) at the University of Leeds. His research focuses on understanding the causes of, and developing effective therapies for, common joint problems. He has previously chaired NICE osteoarthritis clinical guidance, is co-editor of the Oxford Textbook of Rheumatology and has co-authored over 650 publications as original research, reviews and book chapters. He has received multiple international research awards including the Carol Nachman award for Rheumatology, the OARSI Clinical Research award and the Elise Jourdevant prize.

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Philip Corr

Prior to joining City University London in 2013, Professor Corr held Professorial positions at the University of East Anglia (2009-2013; where he was Head of Psychology) and Swansea University (2004-2009; where he served as Head of Department); and previously, he was Senior Lecturer at Goldsmiths, University of London. His professional affilations include: Chartered Psychologist (C.Psychol.) of the British Psychological Society (BPS; and also an Associate Fellow); Fellow of Higher Education Academy (FHEA); and a Chartered Scientist of the Science Council (CSci). Professor Corr is also a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts (FRSA).

Professional activities

Professor Corr is one of the Co-Founding Presidents (along with Professor Eammon Ferguson, Nottingham University) of the British Society for the Psychology of Individual Differences (BSPID), which has the aim of furthering the scientific study of individual differences in the UK.

He was honoured to be elected by Society members to the offices of President-Elect (2013-2015) and President (2015-2017) of the International Society for the Study of Individual Differences (ISSID), which is the main international scientific society in this area of psychology.

Professor Corr holds editorial positions with several scientific journals in the field of personality and individual differences.

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Philip Dalinjong

Lecturer and Researcher in Public Health, Torrens University Australia
Dr Philip Dalinjong is a lecturer and researcher in the Public Health Department at Torrens University. His research is focused on ensuring optimal use of scarce health resources for the benefit of all, and that all have access to health care services when needed.

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Philip Empey

Associate Professor of Pharmacogenomics, University of Pittsburgh
Dr. Philip Empey is the Associate Director for Pharmacogenomics of the Pitt/UPMC Institute for Precision Medicine and leads the PreCISE-Rx and Test2Learn teams to implement pharmacogenomics clinical, research, and educational initiatives. He also directs the University of Pittsburgh - Thermo Fisher Scientific Pharamcogenomics Center of Excellence which is deploying population scale preemptive pharmagenomics testing (to >150,000 patients) in western Pennsylvania. As a clinician-scientist in the Department of Pharmacy and Therapeutics, Dr. Empey conducts NIH-funded clinical and translational research aimed at understanding the mechanisms of the variability in drug response to improve medication-related outcomes in critically-ill patients.

He received his PharmD from the University of Rhode Island and completed PGY1 and PGY2 residencies in Pharmacy Practice and Critical Care at the University of Kentucky. He earned a PhD in Clinical Pharmaceutical Sciences at the University of Kentucky before completing postdoctoral research training at the University of Pittsburgh.

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Philip Ewell

Professor of music theory, Hunter College
Philip Ewell is a professor of music theory at Hunter College of the City University of New York. His research specialties include race studies in music theory, Russian music theory, Russian opera, modal theory and history, twentieth-century music theory, and hiphop and popular music. As a public music theorist his scholarship has been featured in Adam Neely’s YouTube channel, the BBC, Die Zeit, the New York Times, the New Yorker, and WQXR’s Aria Code, among others.

Philip's monograph, On Music Theory, and Making Music More Welcoming for Everyone, which appeared with the University of Michigan Press’s Music and Social Justice series in Spring 2023, takes an antiracist approach to music education for the twenty-first century. He is also under contract at W. W. Norton to coauthor a new music theory textbook, The Engaged Musician: Theory and Analysis for the Twenty-First Century, which will be a modernized and inclusive textbook based on recent developments in music theory pedagogy, with a projected publication date in 2024. Philip is the editor of the Oxford University Press book series Theorizing African American Music, which launched in Fall 2022.

For more information on Philip visit his website, philipewell.com.

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Philip Fearnside

Biólogo e Pesquisador titular (Departamento de Ecologia), Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazônia (INPA)

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Philip Hancock

Professor of Work and Organisation, University of Essex
Philip Hancock is a Professor of Work and Organisation at Essex Business School at the University of Essex. Before joining Essex Business School he was an Associate Professor at the University of Warwick.

His academic background is in theoretical and qualitative sociology, and he holds an MA in Philosophy and Social Theory from the University of Warwick and a PhD from Keele University.

His research interests include practices of organisational aestheticisation, the architectural management of space and place, practices of interactive service work and, in particular, the production and reproduction of socio-economic and organisational relations at Christmas.

He has published widely in leading journals in the field of organisation studies and sociology and has published the books The Body, Culture and Society: An Introduction (Open University Press), Work, Postmodernism and Organization: A Critical Introduction (Sage), Art and Aesthetics at Work (Palgrave), Understanding Corporate Life (Sage), The Management of Everyday Life (Palgrave), Work and Organization: The Aesthetic Dimension (ISCE). He is a member of the editorial boards of Organization Studies (Sage), Organization (Sage) and Work, Employment and Society (Sage).

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Philip Hulme

Distinguished Professor in Pest Management and Conservation, Lincoln University, New Zealand
My primary research focus is predicting the risks arising from plant invasions and recent work has examined the traits that underpin the success of invasive species; clarifying the main routes by which these species are introduced to a region; assessing their rates of spread; gauging the vulnerability of habitats to invasion, quantifying the impacts of invasive species and predicting the potential impact of climate change on invasive species distributions. However, my research also includes wider assessments of biological invasions and increasingly the importance of human perspectives such as the role of trade and wealth creation on invasion rates as well as the importance of appreciating the non-market costs of alien species impacts. I apply a wide range of approaches to address these issues including modelling, experiments and field surveys with research undertaken across the world from the forests of North America and East Africa to the montane ecosystems of Italy and New Zealand. I am a Fellow of the Royal Society of New Zealand.

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Philip Johnstone

Research Fellow, SPRU, University of Sussex
I am a Research Fellow working on a three-year project on the Governance of Discontinuity in Technological Systems (DiscGo). Stemming from research on socio-technical transitions this project studies the under-examined ‘flip side’ to innovation – how technology governance can address the crucial task of disengaging from well-established socio-technical systems. The project is in collaboration with colleagues at the INRA in Paris, TSG in Dortmund and led by Stefan Kuhlmann in Twente. The Sussex case study is civilian nuclear energy, where the governance patterns of France, Germany, the Netherlands and the UK will be examined.

I am also the Tyndall Centre Coordinator for the University of Sussex, a leading research network on climate change and sustainability involving several Universities in the UK as well as one in China. Prior to joining SPRU I completed an MSc in Environmental Governance with Distinction at the University of Manchester, before completing a PhD on Public Engagement with Nuclear Power in the UK. Whilst writing up I worked as a Post-Doctoral Researcher on the ESRC Biosecurity Borderlands project, and then the ESRC Visualising Climate Change project also at Exeter.

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Philip Lloyd

Research Professor: Energy Institute, Cape Peninsula University of Technology, Cape Town; Fellow: SA Acad of Engineering ; Fellow & Past President, SA Institution of Chemical Engineers; Fellow, SA Institute of Mining & Metallurgy; Fellow: SA Chemical Institute (SACI);

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Philip Osano

Research Fellow, Stockholm Environment Institute
Philip Osano is Africa Centre Director, Stockholm Environment Institute.
Philip leads SEI’s research, policy engagement, and capacity strengthening on environment and development in Africa. Prior to joining SEI, he was a Technical Consultant at the African Union Commission supporting the development of the Implementation Strategy and Roadmap for the
Comprehensive African Agricultural Development Programme (CAADP). He has interest in environmental policy, development, and international affairs with over 20 years of experience in applied research, project coordination, policy analysis, and university teaching on diverse topics including biodiversity conservation, climate change, agricultural policy, water and land management, and integrated environmental planning. Philip has published and co-authored more than 50 publications.
A Jean Sauvé Fellow in Public Leadership, he holds a PhD in Geography from McGill University in Canada, an MSc in Conservation Biology from the
University of Cape Town in South Africa, and a BSc in Environmental Science from Egerton University in Kenya.

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Philip Resnick

Professor Emeritus, Political Science, University of British Columbia
I taught political science for over 40 years at the University of British Columbia. In the course of my academic career, I published ten books and scores of academic articles and chapters in books on topics ranging from Canadian and Quebec politics to democratic theory and comparative nationalism.

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Philip Slavin

Associate Professor of History, University of Stirling
I was born in St Petersburg, Russia and began my university career at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, where I pursued two concurrent degrees in History and Violin Performance. I received my PhD in Medieval History from the Centre for Medieval Studies at the University of Toronto (2008). Before joining Stirling in 2018, I spent two years as a postdoctoral fellow at the Economic Growth Center, at Yale University (2008-10), three years as a Mellon Fellow and faculty lecturer at McGill University, Montreal (2010-3) and five years as a lecturer and then senior lecturer at the University of Kent (2013-8).

When outside a classroom or his office, I enjoy listening to and playing music (be it Classical, Jazz, Rock or Folk), tasting ales and whiskies (the more obscure the better), cooking, and hiking (the further away from 'Civilization' the better). I love languages and have always been attracted to their beauty, written or spoken.

My scientific creed and research interests

Rather than seeing myself as an historian in the ‘traditional’ sense, I view myself as a ‘scientist of the past’, trained to work across disciplines and collaborate with colleagues in sciences, to promote a unified knowledge and science of the past. In my research, I use historical knowledge as a powerful tool to understand some of the most important issues and challenges that the human race and its wider bio-ecological environment face today.

My principle research interests fall into two main categories. Firstly, I am interested in the history of natural environment, economy, health, and society of the late-medieval world, with a particular focus on the British Isles within the wider North Atlantic context, and Central Asia within the wider Eurasian context. My first monograph Bread and Ale for the Brethren: The Provisioning of Norwich Cathedral Priory, c.1260-1536 (2012) offers a re-interpretation of the decline of feudal system in England, through the prism of food production and consumption by local landlords. My second monograph Experiencing Famine: A Fourteenth-Century Environmental Shock in the British Isles , recently published with Brepols, examines the Great European Famine of 1315-17 (arguably the single worst subsistence crisis in Europe in the last two millennia) as a case-study to answer the most pressing question ‘What creates famine?’ In addition, I have authored (and in some cases co-authored) 34 articles on various topics related to environmental, economic and social history of late-medieval world.

Secondly, in recent years I have expanded my interests in these topics to a global ‘deep history’ perspective, all the way from early hunters-gatherers to our contemporary world. These topics are among the most pressing and complex socio-economic, environmental and political issues that scientists, NGOs and policy makers are struggling with today. Before these issues can be solved, we need a better understanding of their determinants and dynamics in a long-run historical context. I am currently working on two large-scale monograph projects. The one will examine the historical roots of global economic inequality, in a very long run. It argues that we cannot fully appreciate the phenomenon of global economic inequality, unless we study the development of socio-economic and cultural institutions from a ‘deep history’ perspective, which follows this development from early hunter-gatherer societies to our contemporary world. The other monograph is a global history of the single most notorious killer: plague - all the way from the Late Neolithic Period until sporadic outbreaks in the 21st century. This book, too, takes a deep history perspective, to answer some most pressing questions related to the phenomenon of ‘emerging diseases’, such as ‘What makes some diseases so deadly?’ ‘What is the relationship between emerging diseases and a wider bio-ecological and climatic environment?’ ‘What makes those diseases fade and disappear – or, by contrast – re-emerge again?’

I welcome enquiries from prospective research students interested in the environmental, economic, social and medical history of late-medieval and early modern British Isles and other parts of the European and North Atlantic world.

Publications

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Philip Wiseman

Research Fellow, Astronomy, University of Southampton
I research the most extreme events in the Universe: exploding stars (supernovae) and giant flares from super-massive black holes. I am an expert in using a particular type of exploding star, known as a "type Ia supernova", to measure distances in the Universe. We can use these to infer the expansion history of the Universe and understand what it is made of.
In 2023 I led the discovery and analysis of the largest cosmic explosion ever detected, AT2021lwx, which was 10 times brighter than any known exploding star. We believe that the extreme luminosity was caused by huge amounts of gas from a giant cloud falling onto a super-massive black hole.

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Philip D Parker

Pro-vice-chancellor Research, Australian Catholic University
Professor Philip Parker is the Pro-vice-chancellor - Research at the Australian Catholic University. He received
his doctorate in educational psychology from the University of Sydney. His major
research interest includes educational inequality, developmental transitions, and educational
attainment.

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Philip J Atherton

Professor of Clinical, Metabolic & Molecular Physiology, University of Nottingham
Despite my relatively early career stage, I have been PI or Co-I on successful project grants from UK research councils (MRC, BBSRC), Eurpoean Union (EUFP7), charity (Dunhill Medical Trust) and industrial (Ajinomoto, Abbott Nutrition) sources to the tune of ~£10M. I have published ~80 peer-reviewed articles (H-index 33) and 4 book chapters and my work has placed me in the world's top 5% of cited authors for work in Biology & Biochemistry (source: Thomson Reuters). I have received prestigious early career awards (e.g. American Physiological Society New investigator 2010) and am regularly invited to speak at national (e.g. Physiological Society) and international (e.g. EB, ECSS, ASPEN, ICAAP, A/ESPEN) conferences.

Research synopsis: My past work has focused on the identification of central mechanisms regulating metabolism in human musculoskeletal tissues, and where appropriate, using more tractable in vitro cell or where appropriate, in vivo animal models. Combining molecular biology, stable isotope methodologies and detailed in vivo human physiology, I have been a key part of a team that has discovered a number of fundamental parameters that govern alterations in protein metabolism with age and disease. In particular, I have led the molecular analysis in the majority of my publications and over more recent years in becoming laboratory Principal Investigator, been entirely responsible for grant income, research direction and development of state-of-the-art physiological experiments. The current direction of our laboratories work involves the combining of detailed molecular physiology with the application of carbon/ deuterium stable isotope methodologies and more recently, the integration of OMIC (genomic/ metabolomic) techniques to discover predictors of, and the basis for, musculoskeletal decline in ageing and disease.

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Philip J. Lazarus

Associate Professor, Counseling, Recreation and School Psychology, Florida International University
Lazarus has served as the Director of the School Psychology Program at Florida International University for over 40 years and his primary responsibility is to train school psychologists to work in the schools. He is currently the internship coordinator. He is the author or editor of four books including: Psycho-educational Evaluation of Children and Adolescents with Low-Incidence Handicaps; Best Practices in School Crisis Prevention and Intervention; Creating Safe and Supportive Schools and Fostering Students’ Mental Health and Fostering the Emotional Well-Being of Youth: A School-Based Approach. He has served as the President of the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP) and the Florida Association of School Psychologists (FASP). He is licensed as both a psychologist and school psychologist in the state of Florida. Lazarus is a founder and Past- Chairperson of the National Emergency Assistance Team of the NASP. This team has provided direct crisis assistance in the aftermath of more than a dozen tragic school shootings. He led the NASP crisis response in Mississippi and Louisiana where he provided crisis intervention training in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina and Rita and he also led the team in the Gulf Coast in the response to the gulf oil spill disaster. He has also maintained a private practice for over 30 years. He specializes in working with children, adolescents and families. His practice encompasses assessment, therapy and consultation with troubled youth and their families. Lazarus has dealt with schools and communities that have been involved with trauma such and loss of life and has provided therapy and assessment following bus accidents impacting two communities in both Florida and Texas. He consulted with the Federal Bureau of Investigation in their landmark study on profiling school shooters and has worked on school violence prevention and bullying prevention for National Catholic Risk Retention Group, Inc and VIRTUS®. Dr. Lazarus has been interviewed by a number of news sources such as the CNBC, CNN, the Glenn Beck Show, Newsweek, Seventeen Magazine, Washington Post, Reader’s Digest, and has appeared on numerous radio talk shows dealing with such topics as depression in children, anxiety in children and adolescents, responding to natural disasters, coping with trauma following school shootings, school violence, helping children deal with grief and trauma following 9-11, bullying in schools, threat assessment, and identifying troubled students.

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Philip-Neri Jayson-Quashigah

Research Fellow, University of Ghana
Philip-Neri is a research fellow at the Institute for Environment and Sanitation Studies, University of Ghana. His research focuses on nearshore coastal processes including coastal erosion and sargassum beaching with the application of remote sensing/GIS and numerical modelling.

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Philipp Schneider

Doctoral Student, EPFL – École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne – Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne
Philipp Schneider is a PhD student at the College of Management of Technology. As a Fulbright scholar, he holds M.Sc. degrees in Engineering & Technology Innovation Management and Mechanical Engineering from Carnegie Mellon University. In addition, he holds an undergraduate degree from Hamburg University of Applied Sciences as a corporate student of Airbus. From 2019 to 2020 he worked as Senior Data Scientist at EY in New York City. Philipp’s current work focuses on leveraging data, optimization, and machine learning, to solve practical problems that matter to society.

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Philipp Winter

Postdoctoral Research Associate in Computer Science, Princeton University

I am interested in computer networks and security, and why the two don't get along very well. I enjoy being part of all phases of a research project—from sketching ideas on a whiteboard, to implementation, and finally deployment and maintenance. To this end, I have worked in the three research areas listed below. I keep maintaining code I have developed in these research projects, so they are open-ended in some sense.

Keeping bad actors out of the Tor network
As communities grow in size, it becomes increasingly hard to keep out bad actors, and Tor is no exception because the network is run by volunteers. In 2013, I started developing exitmap, a fast and flexible scanner for Tor exit relays. If you have a background in functional programming, think about it as a map() interface for Tor exit relays. It allows you to run arbitrary, TCP-based tests over each exit relay. One of the main tasks of exitmap is to expose and block malicious and misbehaving exit relays. I recently broadened my scope to Sybil relays, sets of Tor relays that are under the control of a single entity. I am developing sybilhunter which is meant to assist in finding and analysing Sybils.

Censorship analysis
Early on in my Ph.D. studies, I became interested in the Great Firewall of China (GFW). I was first exposed to the GFW in 2011, when trying to understand how it blocks the Tor network. I have since revisited the topic several times, to understand how the GFW fails over space and time, and how its active probing component is designed. As part of my work on the Tor network, I also helped characterise—and circumvent—a censorship system in Ethiopia.

Traffic obfuscation
Motivated by my work on censorship systems, I became interested in traffic obfuscation, i.e., shaping network traffic in a way that it is hard to classify and block. I started by developing a small tool for server-side circumvention. It was designed to prevent the GFW from recognising Tor handshakes on the wire. The tool transparently rewrites the window size in a SYN-ACK segment, forcing the client to split its initial payload across two segment instead of one. Back in 2012, the GFW would not reassemble TCP streams, rendering it unable to spot circumvention traffic “protected” by this tool. I then went on and developed ScrambleSuit, a polymorphic traffic obfuscation protocol. ScrambleSuit can protect against the GFW's active probing attacks by relying on a “password” that is shared between client and server. ScrambleSuit has since been superseded by the faster and more elegant obfs4, which is no longer maintained by me.

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Philippa Byrne

I am currently a British Academy Postdoctoral Fellow at Somerville College, University of Oxford, where I now research the interaction between Arabic, Greek and Latin thought in medieval law, with a particular concentration on the twelfth and thirteenth centuries.

I completed by DPhil in 2014, at the University of Oxford, on the topic of the relationship between theology, scholastic thought and the early English common law.

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Philippa Ryan

Dr Ryan's area of expertise is commercial equity, in particular the liability of third parties to a breach of trust. Her PhD formulated a new classification for Barnes v Addy liability. Her current research explores breach of fiduciary duty in apparently trustless commercial relationships and self-executing contracts, usually enabled by Blockchain technology. Dr Ryan designed and coordinates a commercial equity elective that examines directors’ duties, Ponzi schemes and the trust as an alternative to a corporate arrangement. Her teaching research investigates how authentic legal processes can improve law students' problem-solving. In conjunction with the UTS Connected Intelligence Centre, she is piloting the use of discourse analytics software to improve law students' legal writing skills.

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Philippe Burger

Professor of Economics and Head of Department, University of the Free State
Philippe Burger is a 2016/17 Fulbright Exchange Scholar at Columbia University, working on the unemployment problem in South Africa. He is Professor of Economics and Head of Department at the University of the Free State. From September 2012 to October 2014 he was President of the Economic Society of South Africa. He is also a member of the South African Statistics Council, which overseas the work of Statistics South Africa. His publications include three books and numerous academic articles on fiscal rules and fiscal sustainability, public private partnerships and macroeconomic policy. Together with IMF staff he also co-authored two IMF working papers. In 2009 the IMF also invited him to spend a month at the IMF as a visiting scholar. In 2007, 2010 and 2012 he was seconded to the OECD in Paris to work on public private partnerships and capital budgeting, while in October 2011 he joined an OECD mission to Indonesia to conduct a regulatory review of Indonesia. He was a member of the Panel of Experts of the South African National Treasury, in which capacity he recently co-authored a 20-year review of South African fiscal policy since 1994.

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Philippe de Donato

Directeur de recherche au CNRS, Université de Lorraine
Mon activité scientifique se place dans la politique de transition énergétique, animée par trois tendances majeures : les sciences de la terre, le développement durable et les impacts environnementaux. Cette activité concerne principalement les enveloppes superficielles naturelles ou anthropisées avec comme finalité leur éco-utilisation dans la problématique de transition énergétique en lien avec leurs protections durables. Les recherches entreprises se focalisent sur l’étude des mécanismes de transfert et d’interaction des fluides dans l’écosphère. La porte d’entrée dans tous ces systèmes se situe au niveau moléculaire (nm). Cette approche, nécessairement multi échelle, s’articule autour de trois axes de progrès principaux :
- développer une métrologie d’observation et de quantification du transfert des fluides en milieux naturels, pouvant intégrer les trois compartiments : géosphère (-3000, 0m), biosphère (0, 10m) et troposphère (10, 10 000m)
- comprendre les mécanismes d’interaction fluides - solides et leurs transports dans les différents compartiments affectés,
- interpréter ces phénomènes d’interactions et de transfert en termes de modèles 2D/3D d’échange intra et inter compartiments.
Ces recherches trouvent naturellement leurs applications dans le domaine de l’utilisation pérenne et responsable du sol et du sous à des finalités énergétiques à savoir : l’exploitation des ressources minérales, la gestion des rejets miniers, le stockage géologique profond de déchets ultimes et le stockage en milieu géologique du CO2, de l’énergie (H2) et la surveillance et la sécurisation de sites émissifs qu’ils soient naturels, urbains, industriels, militaires ou évènementiels.

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Philippe Huneman

Directeur de recherche CNRS, Institut d'histoire et de philosophie des sciences et des techniques, Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne
Directeur de recherche l'Institut d'histoire et de philosophie des sciences et des techniques (CNRS), Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne.
Formé d’abord en mathématiques, il s'est spécialisé dans la philosophie de la biologie, en particulier évolutive, et de l'écologie. Il a écrit de nombreux articles sur des questions relatives au concept d'organisme, à la sélection naturelle, l'écologie théorique ou aux modalités de l'explication biologique, et il a entre autres publié "Métaphysique et biologie. Kant et la constitution du concept d'organisme" (Kimé, 2008), "Pourquoi? Une question pour découvrir le monde." (Flammarion/Autrement 2020)
et codirigé "From groups to individuals" (avec Frédéric Bouchard; MIT Press 2013), "Les Mondes Darwiniens" (avec Thomas Heams, Guillaume Lecointre, Marc Silberstein; Matériologiques, 2011), "Challenging the Modern Synthesis" (Oxford University Press, 2017) avec Denis Walsh, et “Temps de la nature, nature du temps“ (CNRS Ed ) avec Christophe Bouton.
Publications disponible sur http://philippehuneman.wordpress.com
Responsable de de l'équipe "Philosophie de la biologie et de la médecine“ de l'IHPST, et du GDR CNRS Sapienv "les savoirs de l'environnement", il dirige actuellement le projet ANR-DFG "Generalizing Darwinism“ avec Thomas Reydon (Hanovre) , et prépare un livre sur le scientisme et un autre sur ce qu'il nomme "les sociétés du profilage".

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