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Benjamin Kuipers

Professor of Computer Science and Engineering, University of Michigan

Benjamin Kuipers joined the University of Michigan in January 2009 as Professor of Computer Science and Engineering. Prior to that, he held an endowed Professorship in Computer Sciences at the University of Texas at Austin. He received his B.A. from Swarthmore College, and his Ph.D. from MIT.

He investigates the representation of commonsense and expert knowledge, with particular emphasis on the effective use of incomplete knowledge. His research accomplishments include developing the TOUR model of spatial knowledge in the cognitive map, the QSIM algorithm for qualitative simulation, the Algernon system for knowledge representation, and the Spatial Semantic Hierarchy model of knowledge for robot exploration and mapping. He has served as Department Chair at UT Austin, and is a Fellow of AAAI, IEEE, and AAAS.

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Benjamin Leruth

I am a Research Associate at the University of Kent, working as part of the NORFACE research project entitled 'Welfare State Futures: Our Children’s Europe' (WelfSOC). My research interests include Euroscepticism, differentiated integration in the European Union and comparative party politics in Europe.

I hold a PhD in Politics from the University of Edinburgh, a LL.M. in European Law from the University of Kent and a BA in Political Science from the University of Namur (Belgium). Prior to joining Kent, I worked as a Teaching Fellow in Politics at the University of Bath, and as a guest researcher at the ARENA Centre for European Studies (University of Oslo). I tweet @BenLeruth.

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Bernadette Melnyk

Dean and Professor of Nursing, The Ohio State University

Dean, Associate Vice President for Health Promotion, Chief Wellness Officer
melnyk.15@osu.edu

120 Newton Hall
1585 Neil Avenue Columbus, OH 43210

Bernadette Mazurek Melnyk serves as Associate Vice President for Health Promotion, University Chief Wellness Officer, and Professor and Dean of the College of Nursing at The Ohio State University. She also is a professor of pediatrics and psychiatry at Ohio State’s College of Medicine.

Dr. Melnyk’s groundbreaking work spans evidence-based practice, intervention research, child and adolescent mental health, and health and wellness.

In 2013, Dr. Melnyk became one of the few women and nurses elected to the Institute of Medicine – a division of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine whose members counsel government and private sector leaders to help them make informed health decisions. Election to the IOM is among the highest honors in the fields of health and medicine.

Appointed by U.S. Department of Health and Human Services officials, Dr. Melnyk also served a four-year term on the 16-member United States Preventive Services Task Force. That independent group of national experts in prevention and evidence-based medicine works to improve the health of all Americans by making evidence-based recommendations about clinical preventive services such as screenings, counseling services, or preventive medications.

She founded the National Interprofessional Education and Practice Collaborative to advance the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Million Hearts® initiative and its goal of preventing one million heart attacks and strokes by 2017. Dr. Melnyk also founded the National Consortium for Building Healthy Academic Communities, a collaborative organization to improve population health in the nation’s institutions of higher learning.

Since arriving at Ohio State in 2011, Dr. Melnyk has overseen significant steps toward establishing the nursing program there among the nation’s elite. In 2015, OSU’s master’s program in nursing was named among the nation’s top 25 by U.S. News and World Report – putting it among the top five percent of nursing programs nationwide – and the College of Nursing was designated by USN&WR as one America’s top 10 for both master’s and undergraduate online education.

Also in 2015, the OSU College of Nursing received a $1 million gift from FloAnn and John Easton to establish an endowed professorship for child and adolescent health – an important step toward improving health outcomes for a key at-risk population.

Dr. Melnyk has secured more than $19 million in sponsored funding from federal agencies as principal investigator and her findings have appeared in more than 280 publications. In 2002, she received the Jessie Scott Award from the American Nurses Association, recognizing her work to improve health care quality through the integration of research, education and practice. And Dr. Melnyk has been named one of the most 30 influential nursing deans by The Mometrix Blog, which based its selections on data including awards, Top 10 rankings, NIH funding, and NCLEX passing percentage.

Dr. Melnyk is co-editor of four books, including Evidence-based Practice in Nursing & Healthcare: A Guide to Best Practice, Implementing EBP: Real World Success Stories, A Practical Guide to Child and Adolescent Mental Health Screening, Early Intervention, and Health Promotion (2nd Ed), and Intervention Research: Designing, Conducting, Analyzing and Funding, an American Journal of Nursing Book of the Year Award winner.

Dr. Melnyk earned her Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree from West Virginia University, her Master of Science degree with a specialization in nursing care of children and pediatric nurse practitioner from the University of Pittsburgh, and her PhD in clinical research from the University of Rochester – where she also completed her post-master’s certificate as a psychiatric mental health nurse practitioner. She is an elected fellow of the National Academy of Medicine, the American Academy of Nursing, the National Academies of Practice and the American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

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Bernard Lohr

Research in my lab focuses on the sensory biology of songbird acoustic communication. I am interested in understanding the relationship between the production and perception of communication signals in the context of their mechanism, development, function, and evolution. We take an integrative approach that draws on methods from behavioral ecology, comparative psychology, neurophysiology, and evolutionary biology to investigate fundamental questions in animal communication. How do animals encode information in the signals they produce? How do they extract information from such signals perceptually? How do these processes function in “noisy” natural habitats? And, ultimately, what factors shape the evolution of such processes? Understanding the interdependencies of signalers, channels, and receivers is essential for knowing how a biological signal functions in its natural context.

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Bernard Ryan

Bernard Ryan became Professor of Migration Law at the University of Leicester in September 2013. He was previously Professor of Law at the University of Kent. He is the co-chair of the Migration and Law Network, which aims to promote the field of migration law in British universities.

Bernard’s research interests cover the field of migration law and policy. He is especially interested in the following areas:

The legal framework relating to irregular migration
International law relating to migration
The implications of diversity for migration law and policy
The relationships between labour migration and employment law.

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Bert Scholtens

Bert Scholtens is Professor of Banking and Finance at the University of St Andrews School of Management. He also holds the position of Professor at the Faculty of Economics and Business at the University of Groningen, The Netherlands.

Bert Scholtens earned his Masters in Economics at the University of Groningen. After his graduation, he worked with the Postbank in Amsterdam. He completed his PhD on international financial intermediation at the University of Amsterdam in 1994. He became assistant professor at the University of Amsterdam before he was an associate professor at the University of Groningen. In 2004, he became a professor in Groningen. In 2012, he was appointed professor in St Andrews.

Bert Scholtens' research is directed at international financial intermediation and environmental finance and economics. He focuses on finance, responsible investment and energy and publishes in international academic journals. He currently teaches about portfolio management, corporate governance, and credit risk analysis and coaches both Bachelor and Masters students in completing their thesis. He also supervises several PhD students, both in Groningen and St Andrews.

His research interests include Corporate Social Responsibility, Socially Responsible Investing, Energy Finance, Financial institutions (banks, pension funds, insurance companies, mutual funds, etc.), International finance, Financial intermediation, Financial systems and Environmental economics.

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Beth Webster

Director, Centre for Transformative Innovation, Swinburne University of Technology

Professor Beth Webster is the Director of the Centre for Transformative Innovation at Swinburne University of Technology. Her area of study is the economics of how knowledge is created and diffuses through the economy. On these topics alone she has authored over 100 articles in outlets such as RAND Journal of Economics, Review of Economics and Statistics, Oxford Economic Papers, Journal of Law & Economics and Cambridge Journal of Economics. She has been appointed to a number of committees including the Lomax-Smith Base funding Review; CEDA Advisory Council; the Bracks Automotive review; the Advisory Council for Intellectual Property; the European Policy for Intellectual Property Association; the Economic Society of Victoria and the Asia Pacific Innovation Conference. She is also holds honorary research positions at the Universities of Melbourne, Oxford and Tasmania.

She has a PhD (economics) from the University of Cambridge and economics degrees from Monash University.

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Beth Younger

Associate Professor of English & Women's and Gender Studies, Drake University
A Southern California native, I earned my undergraduate degree in English from Humboldt State University in Northern California. I then moved to the deep south where I completed my Ph.D. at Louisiana State University. My research interests focus on popular culture, young adult literature, feminist theory, and women's studies.

I have an ongoing obsession with horror films, which began when my brother forced me (at age 12) to watch George Romero’s Night of the Living Dead. Along with my love of zombies and powerful women in horror films, I am continually intrigued by the amorphous classification(s) of cultural productions as either "high" or "low" forms of art. Is it "literature" or "fiction" or a "trashy novel?" Interrogation of these troublesome labels is an ongoing preoccupation.

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Bethany Devenish

Research Fellow, School of Educational Psychology & Counselling, Monash University
Bethany Devenish is a research fellow at the School of Educational Psychology and Counselling (EPC) at Monash University. Her research focus has been on programs that effect broader community and cultural change, to develop inclusive communities that promote positive outcomes for children and adolescents with disability, and/or from low socioeconomic homes or communities. Her PhD examined the pathways through which poverty can impact the outcomes of children and adolescents, evaluating a school-based program designed to promote student voice and agency within their community. She has collaborated with multidisciplinary teams both locally and globally to support delivery of culturally responsive, strengths- and evidence-based programs for children, adolescents, families, schools, and other formal and informal community actors. Bethany has strong experience in knowledge translation and a passionate interest in child voice, including within research, and system change. Bethany is excited about continuing and progressing her research to see inclusive communities that promote positive outcomes and active participation of all children become a reality.

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Bettina Friedrich

Academic Researcher, PhD Supervisor, University of Sydney

Dr. Bettina Friedrich is a psychologist and researcher.

Bettina has worked in the in the research areas of mental health and mental health stigma at different international academic research departments: USA (UCSD), Australia (USyd), England (King's College London) and Germany (University of Würzburg). In addition to this she has worked for a year as a free-lance journalist for the Braunschweiger Zeitung. Her main areas are Clinical Psychology, Media Psychology and Cross Cultural Psychology.

She is particularly interested in social-psychiatric questions in health communication. She is investigating for example how we use media to communicate about mental health and how this impacts on mental health related stigma and self-stigma. She has also worked on the evaluation of Time to Change, the national mental health campaign of England which is the biggest of its kind world-wide.

Bettina is also involved with the Global Anti Stigma Alliance (GASA), a network of 120+ stigma researchers and health educators from five continents. She produces the quarter-annual newsletter for GASA.

Bettina obtained her PhD from the University of Glasgow in Scotland (Department of Psychology).

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Bex Lewis

As Senior Lecturer in Digital Marketing, I have a particular interest in digital culture, and how this affects the third sector, especially faith organisations, voluntary organisations, and government behavioural campaigns. I moved to this position after five years involved with the CODEC Centre for Digital Theology, St John’s College, Durham University. At CODEC, I researched discipleship in a digital age, drawing upon over 130 voices from ‘the pew, the pulpit and the academy’ on the website http://bigbible.org.uk. My work included highlighting to the church the importance of engaging with digital technologies. Previous roles in academia include ‘Senior Fellow in Technology Enhanced Learning’ alongside temporary lectureships, web editorial work, and research projects (including into web accessibility and usability) at the University of Winchester and Interdisciplinary Research Officer at the University of Manchester.

I have been Director of social media consultancy Digital Fingerprint since 2001, whose clients have included third sector organisations such as Girlguiding, The National Archives and NCVO (via another agency), Christian organisations including The Church of England, The Methodist Church, and United Reformed Church, publishers including Lion Hudson and CPO, universities including ‘Organisational Development in Higher Education Group’ and The University of Limerick, and a range of small businesses, including anti-diet cause ‘Beyond Chocolate’, and involvement in the social media startup Super Fun Days Out.

I am regularly asked to write for a range of publications for a wide range of audiences, and often provide expert comment to the media. The Financial Times described my 2014 book Raising Children in a Digital Age as ‘sensible’ in a sea of scare texts around the topic of children and the internet. I have been on flagship shows such as The One Show (BBC One), Steve Wright in the Afternoon (BBC Radio 2) and BBC News, whilst local and specialist media frequently asks for comment or opinion pieces on aspects related to digital culture.

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Bhaskaran Raman

Professor, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay

Research interests:
- Computer networks, Wireless and mobile networks,
- Protocol design & evaluation, Wireless measurement studies,
- Computing and communication system design for the developing world,
- System building and protocol design for embedded wireless sensor applications.

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Bill Buchanan

Bill Buchanan is a Professor in the School of Computing at Edinburgh Napier University, and a Fellow of the BCS and the IET.

He currently leads the Centre for Distributed Computing, Networks, and Security and The Cyber Academy, and works in the areas of security, Cloud Security, Web-based infrastructures, e-Crime, cryptography, triage, intrusion detection systems, digital forensics, mobile computing, agent-based systems, and security risk.

Bill has one of the most extensive academic sites in the World, and is involved in many areas of novel research and teaching in computing. He has published over 27 academic books, and over 200 academic research papers, along with several awards for excellence in knowledge transfer, and for teaching, such as winning at the I ♥ my Tutor Awards (Student voted), Edinburgh Napier University, 2011, 2014 and 2015, and has supervised many award winning student projects.

He was named as one of the Top 100 people for Technology in Scotland for 2012, 2013, 2014 and 2015. In Feb 2016, he was also included in the FutureScot "Top 50 Scottish Tech People Who Are Changing The World".

He has been an external examiner at many universities, and is currently an external examiner at Royal Holloway (University of London). Also with this he has been involved in many PhD completions and many external PhD examinations (including recent ones in Newcastle, Liverpool, and Dublin). He is part of many editorial boards for conferences and reviews in a wide range of journals.

Bill regularly appears on TV and radio related to computer, and has given evidence to the Justice Committee at the Scottish Parliament, along with being part of the BBC Scottish Independence Team of Experts (specialty: Cyber Security). This includes appearances on Newsnight Scotland, Good Morning Scotland, and Radio 5 Newsdrive, and was named as one of the Top 100 people for Technology in Scotland for the last two years. Along with this he gives many keynote/endnote talks at conferences, including at NISC 2014 on Heartbleed.

He has led many innovations in teaching related to Cyber Security, including with the DFET Cloud Training project and leads the Scottish EU Centre of Excellence for Law Enforcement Training within the 2Center Network, along with being part of the setup of SIPR (Scottish Institute for Police Research). He currently leads on a range of training projects with Police Scotland and a range of industry partners.

Presently he is working with a range of industrial/domain partners, including with the Scottish Police, the finance sector, and many large and small companies. He has a long track record in commercialisation activities, including being a co-founder of Zonefox and safi.re, which of which progressed from PhD work to a university spin-out, though the Scottish Enterprise funded Proof-of-Concept scheme. Over the past three years he has received direct funding of over £2million related to computer security, which has had a major impact on an international basis. Both spin-outs build on patented technology, including one which has patenting protection over three territories around the World.

His current work includes a €500,000 project which aims to build an advanced training infrastructure for Cyber Security and Digital Forensics. Previous projects have included collaboration of TSB Grants with Microsoft plc on a £2million project which aimed to improve the care of the elderly using Trusted Cloud-based services, and with Chelsea and Westminster Hospital on a next generation Health Care platform. This also matches up with other funded projects with the FSA and the Scottish Police.

He has created many innovations in teaching related to computer security, including being sole author on http://networksims.com (Cisco Simulators), and http://asecuritysite.com (one of the most extensive computer security site for academic material in the World) and in creating DFET (an innovative Cloud training infrastructure for security and digital forensics training). His lectures are online at http://youtube.com/billatnapier, with over 500 on-line lectures, and has over 1,500 subscribers, with more than 1million minutes watched. He regularly appears on the BBC radio and TV talking about Cybercrime (see http://youtube.com/billatnapier).

Bill is also a member of the ICT in Education Excellence Group, which has been setup by the Scottish Government in 2012, and innovated the Christmas Cyber lecture for Schools in Scotland (attended by over 3,000 pupils in Dec 2013). He has done extensive work with Schools in promoting ICT, especially focused on computer security, and created the Bright Red Digital Zone, which now includes most of the subjects with the N5 (CfE) subjects in Scotland (brightredbooks.net), and which has extensive coverage of areas such as computer security.

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Bill Tupman

My research is on transnational crime, terrorism and the process of creating a supranational police response to these phenomena.

I am a member of the executive committee of the Standing Group on Organised Crime of the ECPR and run the SGOC blog at:
http://sgoc.blogspot.com/

Research Interests
The appropriateness of supranational policing arrangements as a response to changing structures of organised crime including terrorism. Particularly interested in relationships between Eastern and Western Europe with regard to crime, the Schengen acquis and Justice and Home Affairs matters in the European Union.

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Birger Rasmussen

Adjunct Professor, The University of Western Australia
I have undergraduate (BSc, Hons) and postgraduate (PhD) degrees from the University of Western Australia (UWA), Perth, Australia. I worked as a Development Geologist with WAPET before returning to UWA, where I was awarded: i) an ARC Australian Postdoctoral Fellowship (1997-1999) for research on tracing ancient oil migration; ii) an ARC Queen Elizabeth II Fellowship (2000-2005) on the application of phosphate minerals to date major environmental and biological events in the early rock record, and; iii) an ARC Australian Professorial Fellowship (2011-2016) to investigate the early history of atmospheric oxygen and the Great Oxidation Event. This work has focussed on tracing the composition of the early hydrosphere and atmosphere through time, and the antiquity and evolution of early life. In 2006, a major research program was initiated, funded by the ARC and industry (BHP, Rio Tinto), on the transformation of banded iron formations to iron ore. Current research is centred on understanding: i) how iron formations were deposited and what they tell us about ancient ocean chemistry; ii) the early history of phosphorus and the co-evolution of life; iii) Precambrian carbon and the origin of ancient fossils; iv) the tectonic and mineralization history of Precambrian cratons and orogenic belts, and; v) the potential role of mineral templates in the development of the first living cells.

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Bob De Schutter

Bob De Schutter (MA, PhD) is the C. Michael Armstrong Professor at the College of Education, Health & Society and the Armstrong Institute for Interactive Media Studies of Miami University (Oxford, OH). His interdisciplinary research and teaching interests include game design, the older audience of digital games, and the use of digital games for non-entertainment purposes. He has been invited to teach in Europe, North America and Asia, and his work has been published in leading publications of several academic fields. Bob has served industry as an independent consultant, web developer and entrepreneur, and has founded and chaired the Flemish chapter of the Digital Game Research Association. Prior to joining Miami University, Bob was a researcher and lead designer for the e-Media Lab of the KU Leuven (campus Group T), where he worked on games to facilitate inter-generational knowledge transfer, rehabilitate psycho-motor skills, train entrepreneurial skills, sensitize university students on urban mobility for the disabled, teach the psychology of game design, etc.

For more information about him, please visit his personal website at www.bobdeschutter.be.

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Bonnie Docherty

Lecturer on Law, Senior Clinical Instructor at Harvard Law School's International Human Rights Clinic, Harvard University

Bonnie Docherty is a Lecturer on Law and Senior Clinical Instructor at the International Human Rights Clinic at Harvard Law School. She is also a Senior Researcher in the Arms Division of Human Rights Watch. She is an expert on disarmament and international humanitarian law, particularly involving civilian protection during armed conflict. In recent years, she has authored several seminal reports in support of civil society’s campaign to ban fully autonomous weapons, also known as “killer robots.” Since 2001, she has played an active role, as both lawyer and field researcher, in the campaign against cluster munitions. Docherty participated in negotiations for the Convention on Cluster Munitions and has promoted strong implementation of the convention since its adoption in 2008. Her in-depth field investigations of cluster munition use in Afghanistan, Iraq, Lebanon, and Georgia helped galvanize international opposition to the weapons. Docherty has documented the broader effects of armed conflict on civilians in several other countries and also done research and advocacy related to incendiary weapons. Docherty received her A.B. from Harvard University and her J.D. from Harvard Law School.

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Boudina McConnachie

Ethnomusicology and African Musical Arts lecturer, Rhodes University
Dr. Boudina McConnachie (PhD, PGCE, RULS) is a lecturer in ethnomusicology at Rhodes University in Grahamstown. She co-ordinates various music education courses through the Rhodes University Education department and is integrally involved in the teaching and learning programme at the International Library of African Music (ILAM). Boudina completed her undergraduate music degree majoring in African music (uhadi and mbira) and was a music teacher at a government school in the Eastern Cape for over ten years. She has written two books relating to African music education for school children, Listen and Learn, Music Made Easy (2012) and My Music, My Classroom- Umculo Wam, Iklasi Yam (2016) and is involved in the development of African music curricula for various South African departmental projects.

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Brad Clark

Researcher, University of Canberra

Dr Brad Clark is the UCRISE Sport and Exercise Support Officer. Brad completed his PhD at Federation University Australia in the physiology of training and testing for competitive cyclists in 2014, before joining the AIS Department of Sport Physiology and later UCRISE. Brad maintains a strong research interest in applied sports physiology and supervises a number of PhD students in this area.

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Brad Reisfeld

Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Colorado State University
I am a Professor at Colorado State University in the Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, School of Biomedical Engineering, and School of Public Health. My research focuses on quantitative systems pharmacology and toxicology. I am board certified in toxicology and am a Fellow of the Academy for Toxicological Sciences.

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Brandon Kostinuk

Brandon is the communications lead at Vanbex Group, a cryptocurrency and blockchain marketing and communications firm based out of Vancouver, B.C.

Brandon oversees creation and management of internal and external communications, which include press releases, articles and general inbound content.

He writes the Vanbex Report, an analytical, at times, thought-provoking, look at cryptocurrency and blockchain related news and current events published on a weekly basis.

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Brenda Volling

Professor of Psychology, University of Michigan

Dr. Volling studies the social and emotional development of infants and young children, and the role of family relationships in facilitating children’s developmental outcomes. She is particularly interested in the role of fathers, and the development of early sibling relationships. Her current research focuses on the transition period following the birth of a baby sibling and the older child’s adjustment after the birth (the Family Transitions Study).

Dr. Volling is currently Director and Research Professor at the Center for Human Growth and Development and Professor of Psychology at the University of Michigan. Her research focuses on the social and emotional development of infants, parent-infant interaction, and the role of family relationships in facilitating children’s developmental outcomes. She has conducted extensive research on the role of fathers for infant development and is one of the leading experts on the development of infant-father attachment relationships. She is the Principal Investigator of the Family Transitions Study (FTS), a longitudinal investigation of changes in the firstborn’s adjustment and family functioning after the birth of a second child, which has received funding from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) and the Fetzer Foundation. She was the recipient of an Independent Scientist Award from NICHD and received a Faculty Recognition Award for outstanding research, teaching and service at the University of Michigan. She recently received the MICHR Distinguished Clinical and Translational Research Mentor Award. She is also a Fellow of the Association for Psychological Science. Dr. Volling received her Ph.D. in Human Development and Family Studies at Penn State University.

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Brendan Canavan

My research investigates tourism, marketing and branding. I am particularly interested in the role, impacts and sustainability of tourism in small islands. Current research projects are interested in developing theoretical understandings of tourism.

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Brendan Gogarty

LLB/PhD (UTAS), GLDP/LLM (ANU), Barrister & Solicitor. Chief Editor Journal of Law, Information & Science.

Research interests include International Law, Constitutional Law, Jurisprudence, Science, Technology and the law.

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Brendan Moore

PhD Researcher, Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research, University of East Anglia

Brendan Moore is a PhD researcher affiliated with the Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research at the University of East Anglia. His research focuses on the EU Emissions Trading System (EU ETS) and its political effects on European climate change policy. He holds an MSc in Nature, Society, and Environmental Policy from the University of Oxford and a BSc in Economics from the University of Florida.

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Brendan Simms

Professor in the History of International Relations, University of Cambridge
Brendan Peter Simms is an Irish historian and Professor of the History of International Relations in the Department of Politics and International Studies at the University of Cambridge. Simms studied at Trinity College Dublin, where he was elected a scholar in history in 1986, before completing his doctoral dissertation, Anglo-Prussian relations, 1804-1806: The Napoleonic Threat, at Cambridge under the supervision of Professor Tim Blanning in 1993. A Fellow of Peterhouse, he lectures and leads seminars on international history since 1945.

Simms's research focuses on the history of European foreign policy. He has written a variety of books and articles on this subject, including Unfinest Hour: Britain and the Destruction of Bosnia (2001) and Three Victories and a Defeat: The Rise and Fall of the First British Empire, 1714-1783 (2007). His overarching book, Europe: The Struggle for Supremacy, 1453 to the Present, was favorably reviewed by The Telegraph and the New Statesman.

His latest book is Britain’s Europe: A Thousand Years of Conflict and Cooperation (2016).

In addition to his academic work, he also serves as the president of The Henry Jackson Society, which advocates the view that supporting and promoting liberal democracy and liberal interventionism should be an integral part of Western foreign policy.

He is President of the Project for Democratic Union, a Munich-based student-organised think tank.

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Brendan Skip Mark

Professor of political science, University of Rhode Island
Brendan Skip Mark joined the URI political science department in 2018. His research explores the intersections between human rights, political economy, collective dissent, and empirical methodology. He tries to unpack the determinants and consequences of: compliance with International Organization agreements, repression, labor rights, violent and non-violent protest, migration and remittances, development, economic crisis, and economic and social rights. He is particularly interested in how measurement and modeling choices affect what we know about these relationships and how an understanding of history and other disciplines can improve our knowledge of them.

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Brett J. Baker

Assistant Professor of Marine Science, University of Texas at Austin

Microorganisms are key mediators in nearly all of the planet’s elemental cycles. However, our understanding of the ecological roles of many groups of microbes has been hampered by low-resolution analytical approaches to studying the staggering diversity present in nature. As a result the tree of life is full of branches, which remain undiscovered, and those, which have only been identified in single-gene sequencing surveys (Baker and Dick, 2013). This is a fundamental gap in our understanding of biology. Filling in the genomic gaps in the tree of life will provide a rich context to understand the evolution of life on the planet and will provide us with a genetic understanding of how microbial communities drive biogeochemical cycles.

Recent advances in DNA sequencing technologies and computational analyses have made it possible to reconstruct the genomes and transcriptomes of uncultured natural populations (Baker et al. 2010, 2012 and 2013). I have been involved in the development (Dick et al. 2009) and implementation of environmental omics since the beginning. I was involved in the first metaproteomic study of a microbial community (Ram et al. 2005) and have been using these approaches to track fine-scale evolutionary processes (Denef et al. 2010). Using these techniques I discovered deeply branching, novel groups of microbes (Archaea referred to as ARMAN) that are close to the predicted lower size limit of an organism (Baker et al. 2006). Obtaining complete genomes of the ARMAN phylum revealed that they have signatures of inter-species interactions and form connections to other species in nature (Baker et al. 2010).

More recently, my laboratory has reconstructed the genomes of hundreds of widespread, uncultured sediment microbes to understand how ecological roles are partitioned in these microbial communities. Many of the genomes belong to phyla which have no previous genomic representation and discovered three new groups of bacteria they play important roles in the global carbon cycle (Baker et al. 2015; Lazar, et al, Environ Micro). One of the new branches for which we have obtained several genomes for is a deeply branched member (Thorarchaeota) (Seitz et al. 2016). These genomes have provided rich insights into the evolutionary histories of life on the planet and we have been able to map the flow of carbon and energy, a microbial food web, through sediments with unprecedented detail (Baker et al. 2015).

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Brian Gendreau

Brian Gendreau is a Richardson Fellow, Clinical Professor of Finance, and Director of the Latin American Business Environment program at the University of Florida. Previously Brian was a market strategist at ING, Heckman Global Advisors, and Salomon Smith Barney, and head of emerging market economics at JP Morgan. Before that he was an economist with the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia. Brian has a PhD in from the Wharton School and a MA in international relations from Johns Hopkins SAIS. He has appeared frequently on CNBC, Fox Business television, and Bloomberg television.

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Brian Klaas

LSE Fellow in Comparative Politics, London School of Economics and Political Science

Dr. Brian Klaas is a Fellow in Comparative Politics at the London School of Economics. He focuses on democracy, global politics, political violence, voting, and elections. Klaas is the author of the forthcoming book: "The Despot's Accomplice: How the West is Aiding & Abetting the Decline of Democracy."

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Brian McNair

Brian McNair is an academic researcher and media commentator. He writes on a wide range of topics including journalism, political communication, popular culture and mediated sexuality. His most recent books are Porno? Chic! (Routledge, 2013), Journalists In Film (Edinburgh University Press, 2010) and An Introduction To Political Communication (5th edition, Routledge, 2011). He is a regular contributor to press, online and broadcast media in Australia and overseas, including ABC News 24, Sky News, BBC World, and many other news outlets. His books have been translated into fifteen languages, including Russian, Japanese, Mandarin, Spanish, Greek, Polish and Albanian.

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Brian Tweed

Senior lecturer, Massey University
After many years as a maths and science teacher, and school advisor, in English medium and Māori medium schools, I completed a doctorate which investigated the effects of curriculum mathematics education in Māori-medium schools.

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Brian Whitacre

Associate Professor and Extension Economist, Oklahoma State University

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Bridget Backhaus

Senior Lecturer in Journalism and Media Studies, Griffith University
Dr Bridget Backhaus is media studies scholar interested in the role of community and alternative media in social and environmental change. A former community radio journalist and producer, her research explores the intersections of voice, listening, identity, and participation within community media.

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Brigitta Olubas

Professor of English, School of the Arts and Media, UNSW Sydney

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