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Bronwyn Parkin

Adjunct lecturer, Linguistics, University of Adelaide, University of Adelaide
My background is in education, specifically in the area of language and literacy and pedagogy. I have spent most of my professional life working in Aboriginal education, from remote to metropolitan, and from Junior Primary to tertiary.
My research interest is the development of academic language with educationally marginalised students: Indigenous, English as a Second Language, and low-socioceconomic students. I draw on three theoretical fields: systemic functional linguistics (Halliday), sociocultural theory (Vygotsky), and educational sociology (Bernstein).

PhD in Linguistics, University of Adelaide (Pedagogy for marginalised students)
M.Ed (Language and Literacy) University of South Australia
Literacy consultant in South Australian public schools, and NT remote Indigenous schools
Vice president, Primary English Teaching Association of Australia (PETAA)
Author: Teaching with Intent 1 and 2, Teaching the language of Climate Change Science
Formerly project officer, Aboriginal Education Unit and the Literacy Secretariat, SA Dept for Ed

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Brooke Macnamara

Assistant Professor of Psychology, Case Western Reserve University

Brooke Macnamara is an assistant professor of psychology, and she specializes in the psychology of expertise, among others. For her first piece for The Conversation, she is writing about sports and children.

And she has news for all parents who think they can engineer the next Tiger Woods.

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Bruce Morley

Bruce joined the department in February 2006, having previously been an Economics lecturer in the SMB at the University of Wales Aberystwyth for about 10 years.

His PhD, Masters and degree were from the Department of Economics at Loughborough University.

Bruce has a general interest in sport, which has led to doing some research into the economics of cricket, such as the effect of winning the toss. He also has an interest in development economics, especially the role of trade on economic growth in LDCs. Otherwise his research interests are in international macroeconomics, particularly models of exchange rate determination. In addition, he is also interested in the economics of the EU, especially the effects of monetary union.

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Bruce Mutsvairo

Dr. Bruce Mutsvairo was a journalist at the Associated Press bureau in Amsterdam, The Netherlands for fours years. Since 2013, he has been at Northumbria, conducting cross-disciplinary research in social media, citizen engagement and political participation.

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Bryan Clair

Dr. Clair's research areas include topology and graph theory. He has been a faculty member at Saint Louis University since 2000.

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Bryan Lessard

Postdoctoral Research Fellow, CSIRO
Dr Bryan Lessard was first introduced to the curious world of flies during his undergraduate studies at the University of Wollongong, learning about the behaviour, classification and applications of the winged insects to forensic entomology. With his interest peaked, he enrolled in a PhD at the Australian National University in Canberra to continue his research on flies, this time describing over 18 species new to science and using DNA to solve the mystery behind the evolution of gondwanan horse flies. In the hopes of generating buzz in taxonomy, the science of naming and classifying organisms, he described a horse fly with a golden abdomen after the performer Beyoncé, 'Plinthina beyonceae'. This “bootylicious” ambassador for biodiversity became a viral sensation and sparked a global conversation on the importance of flies. Dr Lessard now works as a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Australian National Insect Collection at CSIRO in Canberra. Here he continues to research the evolution of soldier flies, most famous for the black soldier fly 'Hermetia illucens' that powers compost bins and could become the next superfood of the 21st century.

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Bryan W. Van Norden

Professor of Chinese Thought and History, Vassar College

Bryan W. Van Norden is a leading expert on Chinese thought. In addition to being a prolific author and translator, he has been praised as one of the 300 best college or university professors in the US by the Princeton Review. Prof. Van Norden teaches at Vassar College, and has also lectured and held visiting positions at leading universities in China. He is available for presentations, articles, or consultations on Chinese history, philosophy, and current affairs, including but not limited to Confucianism, Daoism (Taoism), Buddhism, and their contemporary relevance.

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Bryce Stewart

Bryce is a marine ecologist and fisheries biologist whose work has ranged from temperate estuaries to tropical coral reefs and the deep-sea. The central thread in his research has been to gain an increased understanding of the factors regulating marine populations and communities so as to ensure their sustainable utilisation. His work on deep-sea fishes was among the first to demonstrate their extreme longevity, and on coral reefs he provided new evidence for mechanisms of community regulation of prey fish by predators. More recently his focus has been on how to improve the management of fisheries through the use of predictive recruitment models, marine protected areas and stock enhancement. Bryce has also been especially active in promoting the sale and consumption of sustainable seafood by working with everyone from government ministers to fishermen, restaurants and supermarket chains.

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Bulent Gökay

Professor of International Relations, Keele University

My research and publications cover two interrelated strands- the first relates to the social and political history of the post-WWI settlements; and the second to contemporary issues and political economy of resources in Eurasia. Through my work I have set out to marry macro historical analysis with contemporary micro dynamics of political economy by employing a 'globalist' perspective.

Since the outbreak of global financial and economic crisis in 2007-08, I have been writing on the historical/ long-term origins of the crisis and the overall structure of the global economy, using a particular perspective which can be described as the ‘global shift model’. My recent book, The Fall of the US Empire: Global Fault-Lines and the Shifting Imperial Order (co-authored with Vassilis Fouskas), Pluto Press, 2012, is a good example to this, analysing the changing balance of global power, the hegemonic shift from the global "West" to the global "East/ South". The decline of the US hegemony, the rise of China and other Emerging Powers, and the nature of contemporary global economy are issues of paramount importance for understanding HOW THE WORLD WORKS, the current crisis and Where Do We Go from Here.

I joined Keele in 1996 from Wolfson College, Cambridge, where I had been a postdoctoral Research Fellow for the previous three years. Before coming to Keele, I taught at the Birkbeck College-London, University of North London, and at the University of Cambridge. I am the founder and the Managing Editor of the Journal of Global Faultlines.

My books include The Politics of Caspian Oil by Palgrave in 2001; Eastern Europe Since 1970 by Longman in 2005 (second edition in 2006), The New American Imperialism: Bush's War on Terror and Blood for Oil, co-authored with Vassilis K. Fouskas, published by Greenwood Publishing Group in 2005; SOVIET EASTERN POLICY AND TURKEY, 1920-1991 by Routledge in 2006, Politics of Oil – A Survey, by Routledge in 2006; Unholy Alliance: Muslims and Communists in Post-Transition States (with Ben Fowkes) by Routledge, 2011; The Fall of the US Empire. , Global Fault-Lines and the Shifting Imperial Order, co-authored with Vassilis K. Fouskas, published by Pluto Press, June 2012. (GlobalFaultlines- interview)

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Cameron Webb

Dr Cameron Webb is a Clinical Lecturer with the University of Sydney and Principal Hospital Scientist with the Department of Medical Entomology at Pathology West - ICPMR Westmead (NSW Health Pathology & Westmead Hospital). Cameron's primary focus is understanding the role of environmental management and urban development in reducing the risks of mosquito-borne disease caused by Murray Valley encephalitis virus, Ross River virus and Barmah Forest virus. However, he has also been called on to provide expert advice on a range of medically important arthropods, such as ticks, mites, biting midges, bed bugs and flies, to local, state and federal government agencies.

Key to his research is an understanding of the ecological role of mosquitoes and how wetland conservation, construction and rehabilitation projects may influence regional mosquito-borne disease risk together with changes in the local environment resulting from climate change, potential introductions of exotic mosquito species and personal protection strategies (e.g. insect repellents).

In his position with the University of Sydney, Cameron regularly provides lectures in a range of undergraduate and post graduate courses and has supervised a number of research students including collaborative projects with the University of Western Sydney, the Australian Catholic University and the University of South Australia.

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Camilla Baasch Andersen

Camilla has been a professional academic in Commercial Law for almost 20 years, starting as a Resarch Fellow at University of Copenhagen, where she obtained her initial law degree (Cand Jur). She has held posts at Queen Mary, University of London, University of Leicester and visiting posts on three continents. She has published extensively on comparative commercial law, international sales (CISG) and commercial arbitration. For more information, see her webste at: http://www.uwa.edu.au/people/camilla.andersen

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Camilla Nelson

Camilla Nelson lectures in Media and Communications at the University of Notre Dame Australia, and specialises in fiction and non fiction writing, adaptation and history in popular culture. Previously she was a lecturer in the Creative Practices Group at UTS. In addition to a range of scholarly and other essays, she is also a published novelist. Her work includes, Perverse Acts, for which she was named as one of the Sydney Morning Herald's Best Young Australian Novelists of the Year, and Crooked, which was shortlisted in the 2009 Ned Kelly Awards. She is also a former journalist, and has a Walkley Award Best All Media Online News (2001) for her work at the Sydney Morning Herald.

Camilla's work has been recognised through the award of grants from the Literature Board of the Australia Council and the Australian Film Commission. She has served as a judge of the NSW Premier's Literary Awards (2008 and 2012), the Kathleen Mitchell Award (2008 to 2014), the Sydney Morning Herald's Best Young Australian Novelists (2015), and on the governing board of the NSW Writers' Centre (2008-2011).

Her most recent book is a co-edited collection of essays On Happiness, UWA Press, 2015.

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Caren Morrison

Caren Myers Morrison, associate professor of law, teaches Evidence and Criminal Procedure. She served as an assistant U.S. attorney in Eastern District of New York from 2001 to 2006, where she prosecuted international narcotics traffickers and organized crime. Her research focuses on the impact of electronic information on the criminal justice system and on mechanisms of jury selection.

Morrison graduated from Columbia Law School, where she was a James Kent Scholar (1996-97), a Harlan Fiske Stone Scholar (1994-96), and a notes editor of the Columbia Law Review. After graduation, she clerked for U.S. District Court Judge Eugene H. Nickerson of the Eastern District of New York and for Judge John M. Walker Jr. of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit. From 2006 to 2009, she was acting assistant professor at New York University School of Law. Before law school, Morrison trained as a journalist at London’s City University and worked as freelance journalist in London for seven years.

Morrison’s most recent article, “Negotiating Peremptory Challenges,” forthcoming in the Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology, proposes a system of negotiated consent to supplant the regime of regulating peremptory strikes through the framework established under Batson v. Kentucky. Her previous articles have explored the impact of the Internet on the functioning of the jury, the interplay of Facebook and the Fifth Amendment, the ways in which online access to court records affects prosecutorial accountability and the use of drones for domestic surveillance. Her articles have been published in the Vanderbilt Law Review, the Hastings Law Journal, the California Law Review Circuit and the Columbia Law Review Sidebar.

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Carey King

Dr. Carey W King is the Assistant Director of the Energy Institute at the University of Texas Austin.

He performs interdisciplinary research related to how energy systems interact within the economy and environment as well as how our policy and social systems can make decisions and tradeoffs among these often competing factors. The past performance of our energy systems is no guarantee of future returns, yet we must understand the development of past energy systems. Carey’s research goals center on rigorous interpretations of the past to determine the most probable future energy pathways.

He has both a B.S. with high honors and Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Texas at Austin. He has published technical articles in the academic journals Environmental Science and Technology, Environmental Research Letters, Nature Geoscience, Energy Policy, Sustainability, and Ecology and Society. He has also written commentary for Earth magazine discussing energy, water, and economic interactions. Dr. King has several patents as former Director for Scientific Research of Uni-Pixel Displays, Inc.

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Carl Emmerson

Carl is Deputy Director of the Institute for Fiscal Studies and programme director of their work on direct taxes and welfare. He is an editor of the annual IFS Green Budget. His recent research includes analysis of the impact of the financial crisis and association recession, and the Government's response, on the UK's public finances. He has examined the effect of UK pension reforms on the public finances, retirement behaviour, labour market mobility, incentives to save and inequality, and has evaluated the large scale pilots of the Education Maintenance Allowance, the Pathways-to-Work reforms to incapacity benefits and the Saving Gateway matched savings vehicle. He has previously served as a specialist advisor to the House of Commons Work and Pensions Select Committee.

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Carl Rhodes

Carl Rhodes is Professor of Organization Studies at UTS Business School. Working in the disciplines organization studies and business ethics, his current research investigates the ethical and political environments in which contemporary organizations operate and its effects on their behaviour. Central focus is on how organizations, especially corporations, can and should be held to account for their actions by citizens and by civil society. This work endeavours to contribute to the rigorous and critical questioning an reformulation of what the purpose of work organizations in the context of democracy.

Carl’s most recent books are The Companion to Ethics and Politics in Organizations (Routledge, 2015 with Alison Pullen), and Organizations and Popular Culture (Routledge, 2012 Simon Lilley). His work appears in journals such as Organization Studies, Human Relations, Organization, The Journal of Business Ethics, and The Leadership Quarterly. He serves as Senior Editor of the journal Organization Studies as well as Associate Editor of Organization and Gender, Work and Organization.

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Carla Figueira

Carla Figueira, BA MA PhD FHEA FRSA, is an academic in the field of international cultural relations and cultural and linguistic policies. She is the Director of the MA in Cultural Policy, Relations and Diplomacy and of the MA in Tourism and Cultural Policy at the Institute for Creative and Cultural Entrepreneurship, Goldsmiths, University of London.

Carla is an international relations graduate of the Instituto Superior de Ciências Sociais e Políticas, Universidade Técnica de Lisboa (Portugal), she moved to London after a career in arts management. In the UK, she went on to gain an MA in Arts Management (City University, UK, Chevening Scholar) and a PhD in Cultural Policy and Management (City University, UK, Praxis XXI Scholar).

Carla is interested in international cultural relations as a transdisciplinary field, as well as being interested in the areas of cultural policy and arts management and in language policy. Her research interests encompass several academic disciplines, including international studies, history, cultural studies, sociology, linguistics and psychology. Keywords she has used to describe her work include: cultural diplomacy, cultural relations, sociolinguistics, language-spread policies, international cultural policy, international organisations, hegemony, soft power.

Carla is a member of ENCATC, the leading European network on Cultural Management and Cultural Policy education and a member of the British International Studies Association. She is a Chevening Alumna and Buddy.

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Carlo Ratti

Director of MIT Senseable City Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

An architect and engineer by training, Professor Carlo Ratti practises in Italy and teaches at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He directs the MIT Senseable City Lab and the design office Carlo Ratti Associati. He chairs the World Economic Forum Global Agenda Council on Future Cities. He graduated from the Politecnico di Torino and the École Nationale des Ponts et Chaussées in Paris, and later earned his MPhil and PhD at the University of Cambridge, UK. Ratti has co-authored over 200 publications and holds several patents. His work has been exhibited worldwide at venues such as the Venice Biennale, the Design Museum Barcelona, the Science Museum in London, GAFTA in San Francisco and The Museum of Modern Art in New York. His Digital Water Pavilion at the 2008 World Expo was hailed by Time Magazine as one of the Best Inventions of the Year. He has been included in Esquire Magazine’s Best and Brightest list, in Blueprint Magazine’s 25 People who will Change the World of Design and in Forbes Magazine’s People you need to know in 2011. Ratti was a presenter at TED 2011 and is serving as a member of the World Economic Forum Global Agenda Council for Urban Management. He is a regular contributor to the architecture magazine Domus and the Italian newspaper Il Sole 24 Ore. He has also written as an op-ed contributor for BBC, La Stampa, Scientific American and The New York Times.

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Carlos Gardeazabal Bravo

Carlos Gardeazábal Bravo’s scholarship intersects contemporary Latin American literature and film, the cultural politics of emotion, human rights narratives, ecocriticism, and critical theory. Examples of such intersections are the co-edited volume (with Kevin Guerrieri) Human Rights in Colombian Literature and Cultural Production: Embodied Enactments (Routledge 2022) and two academic dossiers published last year on humanitarianism and representations of violence.

Gardeazabal Bravo is currently an Assistant Professor of Spanish at the University of Dayton’s Department of Global Languages and Cultures, where he collaborates in the Latinx and Latin American Studies program. He teaches a wide variety of courses on Latin American culture, human rights narratives, and race and ethnic studies.

He received his Ph.D. in Spanish studies specializing in Latin American Literature, and a Graduate Certificate in Human Rights from the University of Connecticut (2018). Prior to this, he earned an MA in Hispanic Linguistics from the Instituto Caro y Cuervo and a BA in philosophy from the Universidad Nacional de Colombia.

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Carlos Góes

Doctoral Candidate in Economics, University of California, San Diego
Carlos Góes is the founder of Instituto Mercado Popular, a São Paulo-based think tank. He has previously worked as Senior Economic Advisor at the Office of the President of Brazil and as a researcher at the International Monetary Fund, the World Trade Organization, the World Bank, and U.S. think tanks.

His work has been featured in global outlets such as the Wall Street Journal, the Financial Times, El País and Le Monde. His research spans over different topics (including trade, economic development, and income inequality). Góes has been named one of the “30 persons every investor should follow” by Infomoney, a Brazilian finance magazine, and is an economics columnist for O Globo, a major Brazilian newspaper.

In 2016, he founded Instituto Mercado Popular, which focuses on designing evidence-based public policy marrying the goals of social inclusion and fiscal responsibility. The Institute’s research has been used in Brazilian congressional committees as official grounds for debate and decisions, as well as quoted in the national and international press.

Góes is a PhD candidate in Economics (UC San Diego), holds a MA in International Economics (Johns Hopkins SAIS), and a BA in International Relations (University of Brasilia). A coding enthusiast, he works in Python, Stata, Eviews, LaTeX, R, Julia, and Matlab.

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Carlos Ibañez del Rivero

PhD candidate, School of Natural Sciences, Macquarie University

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Carlton Mark Waterhouse

Professor Carlton Waterhouse has served at the Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law since 2010. He is nationally recognized for his work on environmental justice and is known internationally for his research and writing on reparations for historic injustices and state human rights violations. His views have been published in the Wall Street Journal online and his articles have appeared in prestigious law journals including the Pennsylvania Journal of International Law, the Fordham Environmental Law Review, and the Rutgers Law Review. He attended college at the Pennsylvania State University where he studied engineering and the ethics of technology before deciding to pursue a legal education. He is a graduate of Howard University School of Law, where he was admitted as one of its distinctive Merit Fellows. While in law school, he was selected for an internship with the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law where he participated in the preliminary formation and development of the Civil Rights Act of 1992. Professor Waterhouse currently serves as a member of the Indiana Advisory Committee to the United States Civil Rights Commission

After law school, he began his career as an attorney with the United States Environmental Protection Agency where he served in the Office of Regional Counsel in Atlanta, Georgia and the Office of General Counsel in Washington, D.C. At the EPA, he served as the chief counsel for the agency in several significant cases and as a national and regional expert on environmental justice, earning three of the Agency’s prestigious national awards. His responsibilities at the EPA included enforcement actions under numerous environmental statutes, the development of regional and national policy on Environmental Justice and the application of the Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 to the EPA permitting actions. Following a successful nine-year career with the EPA, Professor Waterhouse enrolled in a Ph.D. program in the Emory University Graduate School of Arts and Sciences as one of the select George W. Woodruff Fellows. The previous year, he graduated with honors from the Candler School of Theology at Emory University with a Master of Theological Studies degree. In 2006, he graduated from Emory with a Ph.D. in Social Ethics.

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Carly Sawatzki

Dr Carly Sawatzki is a teacher-educator with expertise in curriculum and pedagogy across the Victorian and Australian curricula (VCE, Victorian Curriculum, Australian Curriculum). Carly's subject areas include upper primary Mathematics, middle school Economics & Business, senior school Business Management and senior school Psychology. Being an interdisciplinarian is critical to her key area of interest, contextual learning.

Carly's PhD explored the role of social and mathematical understandings in children's financial problem-solving and decision-making. Her ongoing research focuses on the 'Money and financial mathematics'​ strand of the Australian Curriculum - Mathematics in upper primary school, and has involved developing, trialling, studying, and refining unique financial dilemmas and associated pedagogies to enhance financial literacy teaching and learning. Some of her tasks have been included in the Encouraging Persistence, Maintaining Challenge (EPMC) project.

Before switching careers to teaching and academia, Carly worked in marketing and business development roles in the finance industry.

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Carol Johnson

Carol Johnson has published numerous chapters and articles on Australian politics. She is also the author of the books, The Labor Legacy: Curtin, Chifley, Whitlam, Hawke (Allen and Unwin, Sydney, 1989) and Governing Change: From Keating to Howard (Network Books, Perth, 2nd edition 2007). Most recently she co-edited, Carol Johnson and John Wanna (with Hsu-Ann Lee), Abbott's Gambit: The 2013 Australian Federal Election (ANU Press, Canberra, 2015) http://press.anu.edu.au/titles/abbotts-gambit/

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Carole Mundell

Mundell - Professor of Extragalactic Astronomy - is an observational astrophysicist who specialises in astrophysical phenomena outside of our own galaxy, including gamma ray bursts and active galactic nuclei.

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Caroline Clark

Senior Lecturer in Organisation Studies, The Open University

Caroline Clarke is a Senior Lecturer in Management at the Open University Business School. Caroline previously worked in Bristol Business School, and prior to that she spent five years as a researcher on the Change Management Consortium (previously at Bath and Cranfield University).

Caroline's undergraduate degree was awarded by the Open University and her positive student experience meant that returning to the Open University some years later as an academic was an easy decision to take. Caroline's main research interests are located in identity and emotion, and she has also written about managers and change, and has presented on auto-ethnography as a methodology. Caroline has recently collaborated on a 3 year study of academics in business schools exploring concepts of identities, insecurities, gender, and career behaviours amid the increasingly performative demands of academia.

Caroline is currently conducting research looking at the professional identities of Veterinary Surgeons with Professor David Knights. For this timely and important project they have been awarded several small grants and now hope to extend their work to include a cross-cultural study to help inform and make a comparison with the findings from the UK (73 veterinary surgeons).

Caroline work is qualitative, and is situated within a critical interpretive framework, with a particular interest and focus on discourse.

Caroline has published in Human Relations, Organization Studies, the International Journal of Human Resource Management, and the Scandinavian Journal of Management. Caroline also undertakes peer reviewing activity for a number of journals.

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Caroline Graff

Professor of Genetic Dementia Research, Karolinska Institutet
Caroline Graff was appointed Professor of Genetic Dementia Research at Karolinska Institutet in 2011.

Caroline Graff gained her degree in medicine in 1992 at Uppsala University before becoming PhD in clinical genetics in 1997. Between 1997 and 2001 she did her postdoc in mitochondrial biology at Karolinska Institutet.

From 2002 to 2006 she carried out research at the then Neurotec department at KI. In 2007 she became an associate professor at KI where, during the period 2007-2009, she worked as a specialist in clinical genetics at Karolinska University Hospital. From 2009 to 2010 she worked as a university lecturer in genetic dementia research at KI combined with a post as a clinical specialist at Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge.

She is a founding member of Swedish Frontotemporal dementia Initiative, which is a network for researchers clinicians, patients and carers, and since 2011 she has been the director of the Brain Bank at Karolinska Institutet.

Caroline Graffs research aims to find genetic markers for neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's FTD, ALS and Parkinson's. It should increase knowledge of individual genetic risk factors for these diseases, knowledge which in turn could be applied to clinical practice in the form of genetic and preventive counselling.

Around 55 million people globally suffer from dementia, where Alzheimer's is the most common and the number is feared to increase threefold up until 2050.

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Caroline Isaksson

Senior Lecturer and Associate Professor in Biology, Evolutionary Ecology unit, Lund University

Caroline is the Senior Lecturer in Biology at Lund University. Her main research interests lie in the interface between ecology, evolution, toxicology and physiology and her current research focuses on the impacts of urbanization on avian populations. Before her permanent position at Lund University, she was a post-doctoral fellow at Oxford University/UK and at the University of Groningen/the Netherlands. Her PhD-degree was awarded in 2007 at Gothenburg University/Sweden.

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Caroline Knowles

Caroline writes on race and ethnicity, especially postcolonial whiteness, circulations of people (as migrants) and objects, urbanism and madness. She specializes in visual, spatial and biographical methods. She collaborates with photographers, most recently with Douglas Harper of Duquesne University in Pittsburg investigating how British migrants live in Hong Kong (funded by the British Academy). She has just completed the biography of a pair of flip-flop sandals with artist Michael Tan of Nanyang Technological University in Singapore (funded by the British Academy). This involved following the plastic trail from factories in SE China to Ethiopia, one of China’s most important emerging markets, passing through the lives of migrant factory workers, smugglers, market traders and onto the feet of an elderly woman navigating the streets of Addis Ababa in a year old pair of flip-flops. She also worked with Roger Hewitt and colleagues in Hamburg and Bergen on 'The Architecture of Religious Transmission'. This project, funded by NORFACE, investigates the mechanisms of religious transmission among young people in the Finsbury Park area of London and comparable sites in Hamburg and Oslo. She is currently working on a research project investigating British migrants in Beijing.

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Caroline Summers

Assistant Professor of Translation & Transcultural Studies, University of Warwick
Caroline Summers is Assistant Professor of Translation and Transcultural Studies at the University of Warwick. Prior to joining Warwick in 2022, she worked at the University of Leeds (2012-2022).

Caroline’s research explores translation in the literature of German Reunification (1989/90) and its aftermath. More broadly, she is interested in literary translation and how it links to ideas about authorship, and also in the power of narratives to shape our identities and our lives.

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Caroline West

Senior Lecturer in Philosophy, University of Sydney
Caroline's research addresses fundamental questions about how we should live. Currently she is researching the nature of happiness and its role in well-being and the good life. What is happiness? Why should we want it? And how do we get it?

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Carolyn Greene

Associate Professor, Criminology, Athabasca University
Dr. Carolyn Greene is an Associate Professor in the Criminal Justice Program at Athabasca University. She holds a Bachelor of Arts degree (Criminal Justice and Public Policy) from the University of Guelph, a Master of Arts degree (Criminology) from the University of Toronto and completed her Ph.D. (Criminology) at the University of Toronto.

Currently, her research is focussed on three SSHRC-funded studies examining immigrant perceptions of police in Canada; experiences of invasive policing practices in Toronto; and community perceptions of and experiences with safe consumption services in Edmonton, Calgary., and Lethbridge. Her research interests are broadly focused within policing, youth justice operations/policy, reintegration, and perceptions of and experiences with criminal justice institutions, including those who work within them. Dr. Greene's research has been published in national and international journals, including Crime and Delinquency, the International Journal of Drug Policy, the British Journal of Criminology, Feminist Criminology, and the Canadian Journal of Criminology and Criminal Justice.

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Carolyn Whitzman

Carolyn Whitzman is Professor in Urban Planning at the University of Melbourne. She is the lead researcher for Transforming Housing and lead editor of 'Melbourne: What Next? A discussion on creating a better future for Melbourne' (Research Monograph No. 1, Melbourne Sustainable Society Institute, University of Melbourne, 2014), 'Building Inclusive Cities: Women’s Safety and the Right to the City' (Earthscan, 2013), author of 'Suburb, Slum, Urban Village: Transformations in a Toronto Neighbourhood 1875-2002' (University of British Columbia Press, 2009) and 'The Handbook of Community Safety, Gender, and Violence Prevention: practical planning tools' (Earthscan, 2008), and the co-author of 'Safe Cities: guidelines for planning, design, and management' (Van Nostrand Reinhold, 1995). She has also published numerous peer-reviewed scholarly publications, book chapters, and reports on partnerships for social justice in the city, with particular emphasis on the supporting the rights of women, children and people with disabilities to access affordable housing, public transportation, social services, and public space.

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Carolyn Yule

Associate Professor of Sociology, University of Guelph
Carolyn Yule's research uses a combination of quantitative and qualitative methods to examine how life course events and processes shape stability and change in criminal behaviour. She also investigates how criminal court decisions shape the lives of criminal justice involved individuals.

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Caron Carter

Senior Lecturer in Chilhood and Early Years Education, Sheffield Hallam University
I am a researcher and teacher in the field of Early Childhood Education. Prior to joining Sheffield Hallam University in 2007, I was an Early Years Teacher in a Nursery Infant School and a Primary School for over ten years. Five of these years were as a Deputy Headteacher and one as an Acting Headteacher. During this time, I had leadership responsibilities including English and Inclusion. These experiences together with post-graduate study for the National Professional Qualification for Headship and an MA in Early Childhood Education from Sheffield University inspired me to apply to Sheffield Hallam University for a lectureship in 2007. In 2013 I completed my PhD under the supervision of Professor Cathy Nutbrown. My research interests focus on children's friendships. Much of my work has involved looking at ways to develop a listening culture for the voice of the child to be heard and providing opportunities for children to exercise their agency. A critical element of his activity is ensuring that my research impacts on school practice. I am currently researching how schools support children's friendships and also the impact of the Covid-19 Pandemic on well-being and friendships. I am also part of a team from Sheffield Hallam University researching for Save the Children on a project entitled 'Children's Communities'. This is looking at improving outcomes for children in specific areas including, school readiness, friendship, play, transitions. Previous roles include: Acting Headteacher in a Sheffield Infant School Deputy Headteacher in two Sheffield Nursery Infant Schools Assistant Headteacher in a Sheffield Primary School Class teacher in a Sheffield Primary School

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