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Matthew Gilmour

Research Scientist; Director, Food Safety Research Network, Quadram Institute
Dr Matthew Gilmour leads the ‘Listeria and other Invasive Pathogens’ research group and directs the Food Safety Research Network at the Quadram Institute in Norwich, England. Matthew is also co-lead of Quadram’s ‘Microbes and Food Safety’ strategic programme which has a focus on translating the Institute’s key microbiology findings and genomic technologies with partners in food industry and government.

Matthew was previously based in Canada where his group was a pioneer in using bacterial genomics to study outbreaks, including the large Canadian listeriosis outbreak in 2008 and then the Haitian cholera outbreak of 2010. With this experience in public health, from 2015 to 2020 Matthew was the Scientific Director of Canada’s National Microbiology Laboratory. At the NML, Matthew had significant leadership roles for pandemic preparedness and response, as he was also co-chair of the Canadian Public Health Laboratory Network and the Global Health Security Action Group Laboratory Network.

Matthew has also clinical laboratory expertise, as he previously served as a Clinical Microbiologist at the Health Sciences Centre in Winnipeg, where he was the laboratory lead for Infection Prevention & Control, and he remains interested in the evolution and transmissibility of antibiotic resistant organisms.

As a culmination of these experiences, Matthew is also now Director of the Food Safety Research Network, based at the Quadram Institute. This network has the goal of brokering collaborative research projects between food businesses and academic research groups that will make UK foods safer from microbial risks.

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Matthew Higgins

University of Portsmouth
I’m a lecturer at the University of Portsmouth, teaching video game design and development. I specialise in narrative and cognitive psychology and bringing those to storytelling and game design.

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Matthew Hutchinson

Lecturer in Sport Business Management, Keele University
Matthew joined Keele University as a lecturer in Sport Business Management in 2023.

Previously to working at Keele University, Matthew worked at Manchester Metropolitan University as a lecturer in Sport Marketing and Policy.
He has also worked in several roles outside of academia, including at a sports insights marketing agency, football club charities and women’s football clubs.

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Matthew Kirschenbaum

Professor of English, University of Maryland

Matthew G. Kirschenbaum is Professor in the Department of English at the University of Maryland and Director of the Graduate Certificate in Digital Studies. He is also an affiliated faculty member with the College of Information Studies at Maryland, and a member of the teaching faculty at the University of Virginia’s Rare Book School. He served previously as an Associate Director of the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities (MITH) for over a decade. He is a 2011 Guggenheim Fellow.

His most recent book, Track Changes: A Literary History of Word Processing, was published by Harvard University Press’s Belknap Press in 2016; with Pat Harrigan, he also co-edited the collection Zones of Control: Perspectives on Wargaming from the MIT Press (2016). His public-facing writing has appeared in the Chronicle of Higher Education, Slate, LA Review of Books, Paris Review Daily, War on the Rocks, and The Conversation. His research has been covered by the New York Times, The Atlantic, The New Republic, The Guardian, National Public Radio, Boing Boing, and WIRED, among many other outlets. In 2016 he delivered the A.S.W. Rosenbach Lectures in Bibliography, a written version of which are under contract to the University of Pennsylvania Press as Bitstreams: The Future of Digital Literary Heritage.

Kirschenbaum’s current interests include the history of writing and authorship, textual and bibliographical studies, serious games, and military media and technologies. His first book, Mechanisms: New Media and the Forensic Imagination (MIT Press, 2008) won multiple prizes, including the 16th annual Prize for a First Book from the Modern Language Association. He was also the lead author on the Council on Library and Information Resources report Digital Forensics and Born-Digital Content for Cultural Heritage Collections (2010), recognized with a commendation from the Society of American Archivists. See mkirschenbaum.net or follow him on Twitter as @mkirschenbaum for more.

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Matthew Kofi Ocran

Appointed as an associate professor of economics in 2012, and a professor of economics in 2014. Joined UWC in April 2015 from NMMU. NRF Rated as an established researcher in 2012 for the 6-year cycle, 2012-2018.

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Matthew Lamb

Honorary Research Fellow, School of Historical and Philosophical Inquiry, The University of Queensland., The University of Queensland

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Matthew Mabefam

Lecturer, Development Studies, The University of Melbourne
Matthew Mabefam is a lecturer in development studies at the School of Social and Political Sciences. He completed his PhD in anthropology and development studies at the University of Melbourne.

He also holds an M.Phil. and BA (Hons) degrees, both from the University of Ghana. Matthew's research focuses on the politics of international development, inequality, religion and neoliberalism, political economy, migration and wellbeing. Overall, his research examines mainstream development models and their applicability in developing contexts and highlights some of the emerging tensions. In short, his work contributes to the decolonisation of development epistemes, knowledge and practices. Matthew's regional focus is Africa (Ghana) and African diaspora.

Increasing public engagement with development issues and displaced people's wellbeing is at the core of the global agenda. Matthew is highly engaged in public and scholarly activities through sharing his research outputs in media, seminars, conferences and academic publications. Highlights include his weekly appearances on Africa Media Australia as a panellist.

Matthew is also passionate about community development. As a result, he initiates and participates in community-led activities, engages in consultancies, mobilises resources and provides mentoring opportunities to school children of low socio-economic backgrounds. He has prior working experience with grassroots NGOs in Ghana.

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Matthew Nurse

Associate lecturer, Australian National University
PhD (ANU)
Master of Science Communication (ANU)
Master of Communication (Deakin)

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Matthew Olczak

Reader in Economics, Aston University
Dr. Matthew Olczak is a Reader in Economics and currently Head of the Economics, Finance & Entrepreneurship Department at Aston University.

His research is in the areas of industrial organisation and competition policy and sports economics. This has been widely published in international economics and competition law journals. Furthermore, he is a co-author of a book on hub-and-spoke cartels that was published by MIT Press in 2022.

He has taught microeconomics, industrial organisation, competition policy and sports economics and finance. Matthew has a keen interest in using and researching technology, in particular online games, to enhance teaching and learning. He is a Senior Fellow of Advance HE and an Associate of the Economics Network.

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Matthew Patterson

Postdoctoral Research Assistant in in Atmospheric Physics, University of Oxford
I am a postdoctoral research assistant in the climate dynamics and predictability groups. My primary interests are in atmospheric dynamics, prediction on seasonal to decadal timescales and climate change.

My current work concerns the effects of decadal variability of the sub-polar North Atlantic ocean on the mid-latitude atmosphere. This is part of the NERC-funded WISHBONE project in collaboration with the University of Reading, National Oceanography Centre and National Center for atmospheric research in the US. In relation to this project I also am a visitor at University of Reading.

Previously, I studied the role that global warming trends have on skill in seasonal prediction models for Europe, funded through the EUCP project (European Climate Prediction System) with Antje Weisheimer and Dan Befort. I found that warming trends play a strong role in summer temperature variability, hence providing a large amount of predictability. However, even with this skill coming from the external forcing, northern European temperature skill is low, suggesting systematic errors in the forecasts for this region. I have also worked on a project examining the variability of the East Asian jet stream and its relationship to forcing by sea surface temperatures on a decadal timescale. This was a collaboration between the Universities of Oxford and Reading, funded through the Met Office's CSSP China project

In 2020, I completed my PhD on the dynamics of the South Pacific split jet stream, supervised by Tim Woollings at Oxford and Tom Bracegirdle at the British Antarctic Survey. My research involved understanding the factors that shape the mean state, the variability of the jets and how they may change under climate change. In particular, I found that Antarctic orography makes a strong contribution to the wintertime jet structure, altering the behaviour of transient Rossby waves which reinforce the polar jet. A second key finding from my PhD was that the South Pacific jets are likely to become less split in future as a result of changes to stationary waves which arise because of alterations to wave sources at low latitudes.

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Matthew Pearson

Assistant Professor, School of Journalism and Communication, Carleton University
Following an award-winning career in print and broadcast journalism at the Smithers Interior News, the Ottawa Citizen, and CBC Radio, Matthew Pearson was appointed an assistant professor of journalism at Carleton University's School of Journalism and Communication in 2020. His research interest explores the intersections of journalism, trauma, and mental well-being, with a focus on preparing journalism students and working journalists to report on traumatic incidents and those affected by them, and to take care of themselves and colleagues afterward.

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Matthew Piszczek

Assistant Professor of Management, Wayne State University
I received my PhD in industrial relations and human resources from Michigan State University. I worked as an assistant professor of human resource management at the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh before moving to Wayne State University. I have published numerous articles on human resource policy as it relates to workforce aging and work-life role management.

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Matthew Pittman

Assistant Professor of Advertising and Public Relations, University of Tennessee
My research interests revolve around social media and marketing communication strategy. I use mostly social scientific methods like surveys and experiments to understand how people can be persuaded to make good decisions in emerging media environments.

My work has been published in Journal of Consumer Psychology, Journal of Interactive Marketing, International Journal of Advertising, Journal of Consumer Marketing, Computers in Human Behavior, Journal of Business Ethics, and others. It can be found on Google Scholar.

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Matthew Raj

Assistant Professor, Faculty of Law, Bond University

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Matthew Sharpe

Matt Sharpe teaches philosophy at Deakin. He works on classical philosophy, rhetoric, and the history of ideas.

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Matthew Skiles

PhD Student in Mechanical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin
As an NSF Graduate Research Fellow, Matt has conducted systems analysis research as it relates to power grid operations and sustainability. Currently, he is focused on assessing the role of energy efficiency and demand response in increasing power grid resiliency during extreme weather events. As part of this research, Matt characterizes electricity demand profiles using the ResStock building energy model developed by NREL. He uses the ResStock model to generate building stock that is statistically representative of current residential housing and apply efficiency retrofits and equipment upgrades to investigate different development scenarios. He has also focused on investigating the impact that weather conditions have on electricity demand for historical severe weather events and future climate change scenarios.

Before joining The University of Texas at Austin, Matt earned a B.S. in civil engineering from the University of Wisconsin where he worked for several organizations conducting research to inform environmental and energy policy-making processes. After graduating, he worked as an engineer in the energy services industry implementing energy optimization projects at commercial and industrial facilities.

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Matthew Stewart

Postdoctoral Researcher, Harvard University
Matthew is a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard University in the Edge Computing Lab. His main area of research focuses on the development of embedded machine learning (aka. TinyML), machine learning sensors, and lifetime-aware system design. He also manages multiple projects including silicon photonics, designing and manufacturing flexible microprocessors, large language models for hardware-software co-design, benchmarking tools for robotics and reinforcement learning, and neuromorphic computing.

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Matthew Taliaferro

Assistant Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus
We study how the expression of genetic information is spatially regulated within a cell. Individual mRNA molecules are often trafficked to specific cellular locations. This facilitates robust, localized protein production where and when it is needed. Although thousands of mRNAs are asymmetrically distributed in cells, the RNA sequences and protein factors that regulate this process are unknown for the vast majority of messages. We use experimental and computational methods to understand mechanisms behind this regulation and how disruption of the process can result in neurological disease.

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Matthew Tickle

Lecturer in Operations Management Operations and Supply Chain Management, University of Liverpool
Matthew Tickle is a Lecturer in Operations Management at the University of Liverpool. He holds a BSc and a PhD in Operations Management, both from the University of Liverpool. His PhD thesis created a framework for building and managing business-to-business virtual communities. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy as well as a Member of the Chartered Institute of Procurement and Supply.

Matthew is the Director of Studies for the MSc in Operations and Supply Chain Management and teaches both on campus and online.

Matthew’s research interests include Operations and Supply Chain Management, in particular Humanitarian Supply Chains, Quality management, and e-business tools and technologies. He has published in journals such as Technovation, International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, International Journal of Production Research, Production Planning and Control, and the International Journal of Logistics – Research and Applications. He has also been involved in ERDF, FP6 (PRO-INNO Europe), and KTP research projects.

Prior to his Academic appointment, Matthew worked as a project manager in the software development industry.

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Matthew Walsh

Lecturer, Faculty of Law, University of Technology Sydney
Matthew Walsh is an Anaiwaan man and early career academic at the Faculty of Law University of Technology Sydney. Matthew's career has seen him lead a number of programs in Indigenous policy engagement and implementation across the government, higher education, corporate and not-for-profit sectors.

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Matthew Wilhelm-Solomon

Writing fellow at the African Centre for Migration Studies, University of the Witwatersrand
Matthew Wilhelm-Solomon is a Writing Fellow on the Migration and Health Project Southern Africa, based at the African Centre for Migration & Society at the University of Witwatersrand (Wits).

Matthew holds a doctorate from the University of Oxford, which was ethnographic study of HIV/AIDS treatment programmes to displaced communities in northern Uganda. Over the past five years he has conducting research in inner-city Johannesburg on themes of migration, religion, health and housing. He is beginning new research looking at African migration to Brazil.

Matthew has published widely in different books and journals including Medical Anthropology, Critical African Studies and the African Cities Reader, and a number of newspapers and journalistic publications including the Mail & Guardian, Sunday Times, Chimurenga Chronic and the ConMag. He is presently completing a narrative book about unlawfully occupied buildings in inner-city Johannesburg. He is the lead editor on the forthcoming book 'Routes and Rites to the City: Mobility, Diversity and Religious Space in Johannesburg' to be published by Palgrave-MacMillan.

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Matthew Wingfield

Postdoctoral fellow, Stellenbosch University
My research has broadly been focussed on social movements and questions of 'justice'. Ranging from spatial justice to environmental justice, I have done research on groups that have had to strategically leverage a range of resources to actualise South Africa's progressive constitutional rights. I have worked with groups such as Reclaim the City, the Climate Justice Charter Movement and the Philippi Horticultural Area Campaign, and in doing so, developed scholarship around concepts of 'slow activism', and more recently on temporality as a lens.

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Matthew Wood

Postdoctoral Research Associate, University of Sheffield

Matt Wood is a postdoctoral research associate at the Department of Politics and Deputy Director of the Sir Bernard Crick Centre for the Public Understanding of Politics.

He has previously worked in local journalism and lobbying, and has held visiting fellowship positions at the UK Cabinet Office and ANZSOG Institute for Governance, Unviersity of Canberra.

Matt's research interests are diverse, but centre mainly upon understanding the problem of 'anti-politics' as a societal trend of disaffection, disengagement, and anger with liberal democratic politics in western states.

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Matthew Wright4

DPhil Candidate, University of Oxford
I am a DPhil Student at the University of Oxford, working on improving seasonal forecasting. I'm supervised by Tim Woollings and Antje Weisheimer. I also hold an Energy Science Engagement Fellowship at the Royal Meteorological Society, where I help the society bridge the gap between weather/climate and the energy sector. I am interested in climate change, how we can model it and how we can mitigate it.
My PhD is in partnership with AFRY Energy Consultancy, and I will be working for them for 3 months in September 2023.

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Matthew G. Hill

Associate Professor of Anthropology, Iowa State University
Matthew Hill works at the intersection of archaeology, vertebrate paleontology, and ecology to address questions about the people who lived on the eastern Great Plains and Upper Midwest at the end of the last Ice Age (ca. 12,000-9,000 years ago). Current research falls into several areas, including the cause of terminal extinction or regional extinction of Ice Age animals such as muskox, moose, caribou, ground sloth, and flat-headed peccary. Other active research concerns the diet and subsistence activities of late prehistoric villagers in central Iowa, Late Paleoindian ritual practices in the western Great Lakes, colonization and settlement of the Upper Midwest, and the formation of ancient bone assemblages in fluvial contexts.

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Matthew James Collins

Professor of Palaeoproteomics, University of Cambridge
In addition to his post in Cambridge Matthew Collins is professor of Biomolecular Archaeology and the GLOBE Institute, University of Copenhagen.

Prior to joining Cambridge Matthew founded BioArCh, a collaboration between the departments of biology, chemistry and archaeology (BioArCh: Biology Archaeology, Chemistry) at the University of York

His research focuses on the persistence of proteins in ancient samples, using modelling to explore the racemization of amino acids and thermal history to predict the survival of DNA and other molecules. Using a combination of approaches (including immunology and protein mass spectrometry) his research detects and interprets protein remnants in archaeological and fossil remains.

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Matthew Robert Borths

Curator of the Duke Lemur Center Museum of Natural History, Duke University
Dr. Borths is Curator of the DLC Museum of Natural History. He earned his bachelor's degrees from The Ohio State University (Geological Sciences and Anthropology) and his Ph.D. from Stony Brook University (Anatomical Sciences).

Matt is a paleontologist who studies the evolution of animals in Africa, particularly the evolution of carnivorous mammals and primates. He has been part of field projects in Egypt, Madagascar, Oman, Kenya, Tanzania, Wyoming, and North Dakota. He is also interested in the sustainability of natural history collections and the integration of specimen databases. Matt is also the co-host of Aye-Aye Pod, the official podcast of the Duke Lemur Center.

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Matthew T. Hughes

Postdoctoral Associate, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)
Dr. Matthew T. Hughes is a Postdoctoral Associate at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He received his PhD in mechanical engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology in 2023, where his researched focused on the potential of acoustically enhanced condensation heat transfer and the role of machine learning in the thermal sciences. His current work at MIT focuses on developing advanced diagnostics to help shed light on complex phase-change heat transfer phenomena encountered in common energy conversion systems. Beyond that, Matt has conducted research on simultaneous energy and resource recovery methods in water reclamation facilities, experimentally characterizing and enhancing waste-heat driven absorption chillers, and dynamic modeling and re-optimization of water-cooled vapor compression chillers.

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Matthew Tom Harrison

Associate Professor of Sustainable Agriculture, University of Tasmania
Associate Professor Matthew Harrison is an award-winning scientist based at the Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture in Launceston, Australia. Matt is internationally renowned for his work in improving the sustainability of agricultural and land-use systems through innovative economic, environmental and social solutions to demand-driven problems. His team uses systems thinking to develop skills, technologies and practices aimed at improving food production, enterprise profitability, social licence to operate and long-term agri-food sustainability. The impact of his work on carbon removals, greenhouse gas emissions, the climate crisis and food security will have enduring benefits for decades to come.

Matt is the Director of the Carbon Storage Partnership, a multi-million-dollar transdisciplinary initiative that is developing environmentally-contextualised and socially-acceptable pathways aimed at profitably progressing the entire Australia livestock sector to net-zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2030.

Matt has long engendered a culture of research excellence, as shown by his mentoring and supervision of colleagues, his training of the next generation of scientists, and his inclusive approach to leading diverse teams of people. He has supervised numerous Honours, Masters and PhD scholars through to successful completion, and he welcomes enquiries relating to research supervision or collaboration. As an egalitarian, he regularly advocates for social equality of people he works with.

The knowledge, skills and technologies developed by Matt and his co-workers have contributed significantly to the University of Tasmania’s ‘well-above world standard’ Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) rankings in ‘Agriculture, Land and Farm Management’ and ‘Crop and Pasture Production’.

*Career biography*
After completing undergraduate degrees in Applied Science, Plant Science (Hons) and Civil Engineering (Hons), Matt conducted a PhD with the Australian National University while based at the Commonwealth Scientific Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) in Canberra, Australia.

From 2009, he conducted post-doctoral fellowships at the CSIRO in Canberra, Australia, working with various stakeholders to develop fit-for-purpose, legitimate and sustainable livestock production systems. Matt later worked at the ‘Institut Nationale de la Recherche Agronomique’ (INRA) in Montpellier, France, and during this period he spent extensive time at Pioneer Hi-Bred International in Des Moines, USA, and the University of Queensland in Brisbane, Australia.

Since completing his undergraduate degrees, Matt worked with- and was tutored by preeminent scientists in crop breeding, systems modelling, agronomy, computer-, plant- and animal-science. His post-doctoral research integrated the physics, maths and computer science from his engineering background into agricultural science. It was truly a multi-disciplinary training pathway.

Matt joined the Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture in 2012 at the Cradle Coast Campus in Burnie, Australia. In 2022, he relocated to Launceston in support of the University’s strategic plan to grow a critical mass of world-class plant scientists in the north of the State.

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Matthias Efing

Associate professor of finance, HEC Paris Business School
Matthias Efing is an Associate Professor of Finance at HEC Paris. His research on financial intermediation, corporate finance, and governance has been published in the Review of Financial Studies, the Journal of Financial Economics, the Review of Finance, the Review of Corporate Finance Studies, and the Journal of International Economics. Professor Efing holds a PhD in finance from the Swiss Finance Institute and graduated as Diplomkaufmann from the University of Mannheim.

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Matthias Scheutz

Education
M.A., Philosophy, University of Vienna
M.S., Formal Logic, University of Vienna
M.Sc.E., Computer Engineering, Vienna University of Technology
Ph.D., Philosophy, University of Vienna
M.A., Computer Science, Indiana University
Ph.D., Jointly Cognitive and Computer Science, Indiana University

Research
Artificial Intelligence
Artificial Life
Cognitive Modeling
Complex Systems
Foundations of Cognitive Science
Human-Robot Interaction
Multi-scale Agent-based Models
Natural Language Processing

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Matthieu Quidu

Maître de conférences en sociologie du sport, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1
Ancien élève de l'ENS de Rennes (département Sciences du sport et éducation physique) puis professeur agrégé d'EPS à l'ENS de Lyon, Matthieu Quidu est aujourd'hui maître de conférences en STAPS (Sciences et techniques des activités physiques et sportives) à l'Université Lyon 1. Chercheur au sein du L-ViS (Laboratoire sur les Vulnérabilités et l'Innovation dans le Sport), il enseigne au sein de l'INSPE de Lyon. Ses recherches sociologiques et philosophiques portent sur les tendances sportives innovantes, que celles-ci concernent l'utilisation des dispositifs d'auto-quantification (self-tracking) ou l'essor de la sobriété et de la simplicité volontaire dans le domaine des loisirs physiques.

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Matthieu Weiss-Blais

Étudiant la maîtrise en biologie, Université Laval
Je réalise actuellement une maîtrise en biologie à l'Université Laval, où je me penche sur la prédation du renard arctique sur les nids d'oies des neiges. À partir d'observations comportementales et d'expériences sur le terrain nous vérifions des hypothèses concernant les mécanismes influençant la force de l'interaction de prédation.

Le baccalauréat en biologie à l'Université du Québec à Montréal, m'a permis de participer durant deux étés à des études sur la faune cavicole en Abitibi. Les projets étaient surtout centrés sur le Grand pic et les utilisateurs secondaires des cavités qu'il creuse dans les arbres.

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Mattia Saccò

Lecturer in ecology, Curtin University
I am a researcher interested in aquatic environments - both superficial and subterranean - and the incorporation of multidisciplinary designs into the study of functional ecology.

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Mattias Frihammar

Associate Professor of Ethnology, Stockholm University
Reader/associate professor in ethnology with an interest in collective memory processes, difficult cultural heritage and issues at the intersection between nature and culture. Coordinate the Critical Heritage Studies Network (CHSN) at Stockholms universitet. In my thesis, I analyzed social hierarchies in (re)production of contemporary royalty in Sweden. By studying arenas where royalty was present, I showed how social authority was pruduced at the intersection between notions of exclusivity and commonness. The analysis also demonstrated the symbolic and actual importance of the material in the exercise of power, and how rituals forms social superiority.

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