Menu

Search

Mathieu Gautier

chercheur en génomique statistique et évolutive des populations, INRA

  More

Less

Mati Keynes

McKenzie Postdoctoral Research Fellow, The University of Melbourne
Dr Mati Keynes is an historian and social researcher. Their research explores how societies use education to grapple with historical injustices, in comparative and transnational context.

  More

Less

Matilda Hatcher

PhD Candidate, Australian National University
I am a current PhD candidate at the ANU, specialising in the history of masculinity in the British Royal Navy. Last year I completed an Honours Thesis focussing on masculinity and representations of disabled sailors, which was well received and awarded the ANU University Medal. My current project involves looking at masculine emotion and war experience in the Royal Navy during the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars. I will be presenting on this topic at a conference on the history of emotions later this year.

  More

Less

Matin Qaim

Director, Center for Development Research (ZEF), University of Bonn
Matin Qaim is a food systems and development economist with a doctoral degree in agricultural economics from the University of Bonn (2000). Before joining the Center for Development Research (ZEF) in 2021 he was Professor of International Food Economics and Rural Development at the University of Goettingen (2007-2021), Professor of International Agricultural Trade and Food Security at the University of Hohenheim (2004-2007), and postdoctoral scientist at the University of California at Berkeley (2001-2003).

Qaim has research and project experience in Europe, the USA, and numerous countries of Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Much of his research focuses on sustainable food systems, agricultural development, and the reduction of poverty, hunger, and malnutrition. He has over 250 academic publications, mostly in top disciplinary and interdisciplinary science journals, including Science, various Nature and Lancet Group Journals, and PNAS. He has been recognized as "Highly Cited Researcher" in 2021 and 2022.

Qaim is member of the German National Academy of Sciences (Leopoldina), Fellow of the American Agricultural and Applied Economics Association (AAEA), and President-Elect of the International Association of Agricultural Economists (IAAE). He has served on different high-level expert committees, including for the Global Panel on Agriculture and Food Systems for Nutrition, FAO, the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), the European Commission, The Royal Society, and the German Federal Government and Parliament.

  More

Less

Mats Larsson

Professor of molecular physics, Stockholm University
Mats Larsson is Professor of Physics at Stockholm University and director of the AlbaNova University Center in Stockholm, which is a joint scientific center between the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) and Stockholm University. He serves on the Nobel Committee for physics since 2016. His research interests are laboratory astrophysics and its importance to astrochemistry, free electron laser research targeting small molecules, and, more recently, molecular chirality and chiral interaction. He chairs a Nobel Symposium on Chiral Matter during 2020, with Dmitri Kharzeev as one of the co-chairs.

  More

Less

Matt Brooks

Senior Lecturer in Forensic Psychology, Manchester Metropolitan University
Matt Brooks, Ph.D., is a Senior Lecturer in Forensic Psychology at Manchester Metropolitan University, UK. Dr. Brooks’ work seeks to understand how strengths-based concepts such as posttraumatic growth can be used to enhance wellbeing in people who are exposed to adversity, with a particular interest in those who have experienced interpersonal violence. He has engaged in research and evaluations with criminal justice organisations, health providers, and local authorities, and has previously worked with young people in secure residential settings. Dr. Brooks’ work on posttraumatic growth has been published in international journals and quoted by the international media.

  More

Less

Matt Burke

WTW Research Fellow, University of Oxford
Matt Burke is the WTW Research Fellow in the University of Oxford's Sustainable Finance Group. His research focuses on pricing climate and environmental risks.

  More

Less

Matt Clements

PhD Student, University of Sydney
Matthew Clements is PhD student working closely with Professor Maria Byrne in her Marine and Developmental Biology lab at the University of Sydney. He is interested in the ecology of crown-of-thorns starfish throughout their entire life history; from larvae to adult. Echinoderms have had centre stage in his research career to date spanning topics of asexual reproduction, salinity tolerance of the larvae, juvenile-adult interactive behaviour and field based adult population demography and ecology. One Tree Island Research Station, the University’s facility on the Great Barrier Reef, provides a stunning coral reef system to delve into a marine biology career and an exciting place to continue exploring important topics in echinoderm biology.

  More

Less

Matt Dicken

Adjunct Professor of Marine Biology, Nelson Mandela University
Matt Dicken is the head of research and monitoring at the KwaZulu-Natal Sharks Board and an adjunct professor at the Institute for Coastal and Marine Research (CMR), Ocean Sciences Campus, Nelson Mandela University in Gqeberha, South Africa.
He has over 20 years of senior management and lecturing experience in the fields of marine conservation, ecology and fisheries management.
His extensive experience of developing and implementing research projects focuses on better understanding the ecology of oceans with a specific focus on fisheries and the socioeconomics of marine tourism.
He is a nationally rated C2 scientist with over 40 peer reviewed publications.
At the KwaZulu-Natal Sharks Board research department, he is responsible for the strategic vision, management, policy formulation and cost-effective budget control.
He is also a visiting researcher at the School of Biological and Marine Sciences, University of Plymouth, United Kingdom.

  More

Less

Matt Halliday

Lecturer in Advertising and Brand Creativity, Auckland University of Technology
Lecturer in Te Kura Whakapaho (School of Communications) at AUT. An early career academic trying to get the creative industries to help solve the world's wicked problems.
I teach Advertising and Brand Creativity and love helping students use their creativity for a good cause.

  More

Less

Matt Hopkins

Associate Professor in Criminology, University of Leicester
Matt is an Associate Professor at the Department of Criminology, University of Leicester. His research spans of variety of areas in relation to violence, organised crime, security and crime prevention. He has conducted research for the UK Home Office exploring motivations for the use of acid and corrosive substances in violent crime. He is the lead author (with Dr Lucy Neville and Professor Teela Sanders) of Acid Crime: Context, Motivation and Prevention (Palgrave Macmillan, 2021).

  More

Less

Matt Jewiss

Senior Lecturer in Sport and Exercise Science (Sport Psychology), Anglia Ruskin University
Matt joined ARU as a Senior Lecturer in Sport and Exercise Science (Psychology) in August 2022 from University of Hertfordshire where he was a Lecturer in Skill Acquisition and Motor Control since August 2019. Prior to joining UH Matt completed my undergraduate, postgraduate, PhD and teaching qualifications at University of Chichester.

Matt's main research interests are centred around identifying those psychological variables which are associated with peak performance (e.g., challenge and threat states) in performance settings (sport, education, aviation). Matt is also interested in emotional regulation, and I have published in the areas of cognitive psychology and leadership. Matt has collaborated with colleagues on a variety of research and consultancy projects at a range of HE institutions such as Prof. Iain Greenlees (University of Chichester), Dr Matt Smith (University of Winchester) and Dr Oliver Runswick (Kings College London).

Matt was awarded a PhD, Msc, Bsc and Fellowship of the HEA (FHEA) from the University of Chichester. Matt's research interests are performance under pressure in a variety of performance domains, e.g., sport, education, and aviation and emotional regulation (e.g., HRV). I lead L4 Multidisciplinary Sport and Exercise Science and l6 Applied Sport Psychology.

Research interests:

• Performance under pressure (Challenge and threat states, anxiety)

• Predictors of performance and adherence (self-efficacy, self-confidence, motivation)

• Emotional regulation (e.g., Heart Rate Variability)

• Scanning strategies and gaze behaviour

• Efficacy of Psychological Skills Training strategies

  More

Less

Matt King

I am Professor of Polar Geodesy and ARC Future Fellow at the University of Tasmania. My field of expertise is geodetic observation of Earth deformation and the global water cycle, including ice-sheet mass balance and sea-level change and particularly using the Global Positioning System (GPS) and the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE). I also work on reduction of systematic and random errors in these techniques in order to maximise the information content in the data and improve the reliability of the interpretations. I have authored more than 80 peer-reviewed publications including several articles in the leading scientific journals Science, Nature, Nature Geoscience, Nature Climate Change and Proceedings of the National Academy of Science. In 2015 I was awarded the Royal Society (London) Kavli Medal and Lecture (see the lecture at https://royalsociety.org/events/2015/04/continental-loss).

  More

Less

Matt Kranke

My doctoral research project studies the collaboration between the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and the World Bank from an ideational perspective. I seek to explain why, in marked contrast to parallel developments in the global political economy, the IMF and the World Bank opted to partly deinstitutionalise their collaboration after the global financial crisis.

  More

Less

Matt McDonald

Formerly lecturer in politics and international studies at the University of New South Wales, University of Birmingham (UK) and University of Warwick (UK)

  More

Less

Matt McGuire

Dean, School of Humanities and Communication Arts, Western Sydney University
Professor Matt McGuire is the Dean of School of Humanities and Communication Arts at Western Sydney University. He has over twenty years' of experience in the tertiary education sector of two countries - the UK and Australia.

Professor McGuire has held a number of Senior Management roles within the Australian higher education sector. These include Director of Higher Degrees by Research, Director of the Writing and Society Research Centre, and President of the Australian Universities’ Heads of English. Currently, Professor McGuire is Treasurer and a Board Member of DAASH, the Australasian Council of Deans of Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities.

Professor McGuire’s qualifications include a MA (Honours), MSc and PhD from the University of Edinburgh. He also holds an Executive MBA from the Sydney Graduate School of Management and qualifications from the Australian Institute of Company Directors and the Harvard Graduate School of Education.

  More

Less

Matt Morison

Adjunct Professor, Geography, University of Winnipeg
Dr. Matt Morison is a Adjunct Professor of Geography at The University of Winnipeg as well as working in the Water Science and Watershed Management Branch of the Government of Manitoba. Dr. Morison holds a PhD from the University of Waterloo (2018) in Geography and Environmental Management, and a BSc from The University of Winnipeg (2012) in Mathematics and Geography.

The world’s freshwater resources face rising pressure from direct human impacts and the effects of climate change on both water quantity and quality. Climate change, winter warming, forest fire, agricultural land use, permafrost thaw, and oil sands development are just a window into the way we impact - and are impacted by - the water which we need to live.

We urgently need to understand both the state of our natural, less-impacted watersheds and freshwater bodies, as well as monitoring of areas of hard and fast disturbance to be able to make conclusive statements about the effects our activities and climate change are having on these regions. Dr. Morison believes these important research problems requires working at a variety of scales from soil grains and single trees all the way up to catchments thousands of kilometers apart, working within a big team with diverse perspectives and experiences.

  More

Less

Matt Polacko

Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Political Science, University of Toronto
I am a Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the Department of Political Science, at the University of Toronto. I hold a PhD in Politics from Royal Holloway, University of London (2021). My research lies at the intersection of comparative politics, political economy, and political behaviour. I am particularly interested in the consequences of inequality on political behaviour across advanced industrialized countries.

My research has been funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) of Canada, Fonds de recherche du Québec (FRQSC), and Royal Holloway, University of London.

I've published in American Behavioral Scientist; Canadian Journal of Political Science; Electoral Studies; European Political Science Review; Party Politics; Political Studies; Politics & Policy; Politics, Groups & Identities; Statistics, Politics & Policy; and West European Politics.

  More

Less

Matthew Addicoat

Senior Lecturer in Functional Materials, Nottingham Trent University
Dr. Addicoat’s research interests lie in computational combinatorial chemistry – that is using computer calculations to search and sort many thousands or even millions of possible chemical compounds, before any of them are synthesised. In particular, Dr. Addicoat is interested in applying these methods to materials chemistry, where the following three types of materials are of current interest:

Molecular Framework Materials – Molecular Framework Materials, such as Metal Organic Frameworks (MOFs), Covalent Organic Frameworks (COFs) and Zeolitic Imidazolate Frameworks (ZIFs) are highly porous materials made by stitching together various metal or organic “nodes” (corners) with organic “linkers” (edges) to create 2D and 3D frameworks. These materials typically have high surface area, tuneable pore size and changeable functional groups leading to possible applications in fields such as gas adsorption and separation, catalysis and sensing. Given the hundreds of different networks and the effectively infinite number of molecules that can be used to create a framework material, identifying the optimum framework by chance is highly unlikely.
Ionic Liquids – Ionic liquids (ILs) are liquids comprised entirely of ions, differentiated from typical ionic salts by having melting points below 100 oC. IL melting points are low because electrostatic interactions between component ions are weaker, and crystal lattice packing is hindered. This is typically achieved by making at least one of the ions large, unsymmetrical and organic. The physicochemical properties of ILs can be tuned through a judicious choice of ions. This flexibility has driven wide-ranging research into their use as solvents in green chemistry, energy and electrochemical applications, pharmaceuticals and lubricants.
Transition Metal Clusters – Small clusters of transition metal atoms in the sub-nanometre range have been shown to catalyse a number of environmentally important reactions – e.g. the oxidation of CO and reduction of NO. However, the properties of these clusters are very difficult to predict, and adding or subtracting a single atom can change the reaction rates by several orders of magnitude.

  More

Less

Matthew Aldrich

Associate Pro Vice Chancellor Employability and Opportunities and Associate Professor in Microeconomics, University of East Anglia
An applied labour market economist, my research has examined the value of degrees and the role of soft skills, to fatherhood and the role of family friendly policies in promoting gender equality, and intersectional equalities in driving lack of access to government support. With a strong interest in Graduate Outcomes and student employability, I am currently Associate Pro Vice Chancellor for Employability and Opportunities at UEA, with strategic oversight of our institutional strategy for employability, with a focus on teaching and learning and the wider student experience, Welcome Week and building learner communities, and placement activity.

  More

Less

Matthew Ashton

I'm a lecturer in politics and the media at Nottingham Trent University. I did my BA degree in politics at NTU before taking a Masters in Politics and Contemporary History at Nottingham. I returned to NTU to do a Phd on the German part system passing my viva in 2009.

My current research interests lie in the area of the British and American political and media system.

  More

Less

Matthew Beach

Doctoral Scholar, Geography, Queen Mary University of London
I am an artist-researcher working at the intersection of discourses around place, the photographic, and care in more-than-human worlds. My practice spans between more ‘normative’ humanities research outputs in the form of research publications and conference presentations, as well as artistic outputs in the form of printmaking, sculpture, and experimental films/filmic essays.

I maintain broad discursive interests around materialisms, ethics of care, more-than-human enquiry, science and technology studies, and participatory art models and criticism. Recently these areas have been focused on the colonial legacies of houseplants and on jellyfish economies.

Currently a doctoral scholar within the School of Geography at Queen Mary, University of London, my thesis (working title - Connective Tissue: (Un)lively Materialities of Gelatinous Life) considers the intersections between legislation, ethics, and naturecultures in mapping the material and social life of gelatine, collagen, and their related commodities. Gelatine and collagen are animal agriculture (by)products extracted from connective tissues in the form of odourless/tasteless granules or powder. It accomplishes this through three approaches: (1) charting the development of global gelatine/collagen markets by engaging with a selection of historical and contemporary production and consumption practices; (2) focusing on a collaboration between a private company and university scientists working to produce/sustain a coastal jellyfish/gelatine economy in the state of Georgia in the United States; and (3) exploring the emergent world of jellyfish aquaculture and companion gelatinous zooplankton.

  More

Less

Matthew Beard

Adjunct Lecturer, UNSW Australia

Dr. Matthew Beard is an ethicist and moral philosopher. He is currently the Writer and Content Producer at The Ethics Centre, an independent, not-for-profit organisation focused on the promotion and exploration of ethical questions.He is also an Adjunct Lecturer at UNSW Canberra's School of Humanities and Social Sciences.

Matthew was awarded his PhD from the University of Notre Dame Australia for a thesis entitled ‘War Rights and Military Virtues: A Philosophical Reappraisal of Just War Theory,’ and was the inaugural recipient of the Morris Research Scholarship from Notre Dame. He has discussed subjects including military ethics, moral injury and PTSD, cyberwar, torture, and medical ethics amongst others in book chapters, scholarly articles, radio interviews, public opinion pieces, and at academic conferences both domestically and internationally.

  More

Less

Matthew Bond

Lecturer in Social Sciences, London South Bank University
My research is focused on the social characteristics and political behaviour of elites. I also have experience doing health services research. I have been published in The British Journal of Sociology, The Journal of British Studies, Sociology, Political Studies, Voluntary Sector Research, Heart, The Journal of Public Health and The Journal of Epidemiology and Public Health among other journals. I am currently working on a project looking at the British aristocracy in the 20th and 21st Centuries. My research has been funded by the Department of Health and the ESRC

My research is primarily focused on elites. I have completed projects on corporate elites, members of the House of Lords and the hereditary aristocracy. I have examined topics including club membership, charitable donations and political donations

I am currently involved in projects evaluating Cullum Centres for autistic children in Surrey and the elimination of advertising for high fat and sugary foods in Yorkshire and Humber.

  More

Less

Matthew Carmona

Matthew Carmona is Professor of Planning and Urban Design at the Bartlett School of Planning, UCL. He has previously lectured at the University of Nottingham and before that worked as a researcher at Strathclyde and Reading Universities and as an architect in practice.
His research has focused on the policy context for delivering better quality built and natural environments, having worked on a range of research projects examining:

design policies and guidance
design coding
residential design and development processes
delivering urban renaissance
the value of urban and architectural design
the working relationships between housing providers and planners
measuring quality in planning
managing external public space
local environmental quality and standard
London squares and high streets
governance of design, the case of CABE

Matthew is on the editorial board of ‘Urban Design Quarterly’, is European Associate Editor for the ‘Journal of Urban Design’, and edits the ‘Design in the Built Environment’ book series for Ashgate. He is a regular advisor to government and government agencies both in the UK and overseas and writes a column for Town & Country Planning, the journal of the Town & Country Planning Association. He is a Design Council CABE Built Environment Expert.
Between 2003 and 2011 Matthew Carmona served as Head of the Bartlett School of Planning.

His book "Capital Spaces: The Multiple Complex Public Spaces of a Global City" is published by Routledge: http://www.routledge.com/books/details/9780415527095

  More

Less

Matthew Cherisch

Associate Professor at the Wits Reproductive Health & HIV Institute, University of the Witwatersrand
Matthew is an epidemiologist and has done research in South Africa and East Africa as well as with international organisations in Switzerland and Belgium. As an alumnus of the Faculty of Health Sciences (MBBCh 1998; DTM&H 2002), Matthew has strong research links with the University of the Witwatersrand, including posts at the Reproductive Health and HIV Research Unit, and Perinatal HIV Research Unit.

He has about 110 publications, seven academic qualifications from leading institutions (including a doctorate in medical science) and international standing as a researcher and technical writer. Matthew also holds an appointment as visiting professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at the University of Ghent and frequently provides technical advice to the World Health Organization and other international organisations.

Research interests include maternal health and prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV; investigation of associations between alcohol, sexual behaviour and HIV; and the prevalence and meanings of vaginal practices in Africa, and their relation to HIV acquisition.

  More

Less

Matthew Colloff

Honorary Senior Lecturer, Australian National University
Matthew Colloff Is an Honorary Senior Lecturer at the Fenner School of Environment and Society, The Australian National University. His research is on adaptation to climate change, ecosystem ecology and water policy. He is a founding member of TARA, the Transformative Adaptation Research Alliance, a global research network dedicated to changing approaches for adaptation to global change.

  More

Less

Matthew Corkill

PhD candidate, University of Tasmania
Matthew Corkill is a PhD candidate at the University of Tasmania studying Antarctic sea ice. He is looking at the structure of features like ice crystals and brine channels inside sea ice and how these interact with trace amounts of metals, especially iron which is needed by the microscopic plants in the ocean.

  More

Less

Matthew Eshbaugh-Soha

Matthew Eshbaugh-Soha (Texas A&M, PhD) is Professor of Political Science at the University of North Texas. His research focuses on American political institutions, specifically the presidency and mass media, and public policy. He is the author of nearly three dozen scholarly articles and three books: The President’s Speeches: Beyond “Going Public” (Lynne Rienner), Breaking through the Noise: Presidential Leadership, Public Opinion, and the News Media, coauthored with Jeffrey S. Peake (Stanford University Press), and The President and the Supreme Court: Going Public on Judicial Decisions from Washington to Trump, co-authored with Paul M. Collins, Jr (Cambridge University Press). His forthcoming book (Routledge) examines the causes and consequences of presidential rhetoric on immigration.

  More

Less

Matthew Fielding

Research Associate / Teaching Fellow, ARC Centre of Excellence for Australian Biodiversity and Heritage (CABAH), University of Tasmania

  More

Less

Matthew Firth

Associate lecturer, Flinders University
Matthew Firth is an Associate Lecturer at Flinders University. His research focuses on historiography, cultural memory, and the transmission of historical narrative across time and place. He has particular specialisations in the history and literature of early medieval England and Scandinavia.

  More

Less

Matthew Fischer-Post

Research Fellow, Harvard Kennedy School
Matthew Fisher-Post is a Research Fellow working with Anders Jensen on progressivity and development in the long-run.

Matthew has worked at the United Nations in Rome and Mexico City, the Inter-American Development Bank in Panama, Médecins du Monde in Buenos Aires, and NORC at the University of Chicago.

He earned a BA from Dartmouth College, an MPA from Cornell University, and is a Fulbright laureate and PhD candidate at the Paris School of Economics.

  More

Less

Matthew Freeman

Senior Lecturer in Media and Communication, Bath Spa University

Dr Matthew Freeman is Senior Lecturer in Media and Communication at Bath Spa University, where he is also Director of the Media Convergence Research Centre. He completed his PhD in Culture, Film and Media at the University of Nottingham and holds an MA and a BA (Hons) in Film and Television Studies, both from the University of Warwick. Before taking up his post at Bath Spa University in 2015, he taught at the University of Nottingham and in the School of Media at Birmingham City University.

His research concentrates on cultures of production across the borders of media and history, writing extensively on the industrial history of transmedia storytelling. He has also published on such topics as media branding, convergence cultures, and methodological approaches to media industry studies.

Matthew is the author of Historicizing Transmedia Storytelling: Early Twentieth-Century Transmedia Story Worlds (Routledge, 2017), Industrial Approaches to Media: A Methodological Gateway to Industry Studies (Palgrave Macmillan, 2016), and the co-author (with Carlos A. Scolari and Paolo Bertetti) of Transmedia Archaeology: Storytelling in the Borderlines of Science Fiction, Comics and Pulp Magazines (Palgrave Pivot, 2014). His research can also be found in journals such as The International Journal of Cultural Studies, Historical Journal of Film, Radio and Television, and International Journal of Communication.

  More

Less

Matthew Fuirst

Instructor, Integrative Biology, University of Guelph
I am an Associate Wildlife Biologist and lecturer in the Department of Integrative Biology at the University of Guelph. I conducted all my PhD field work in Algonquin Provincial Park, Ontario. ​​

  More

Less

Matthew Gerstenberger

Seismologist, GNS Science
Matthew is a seismologist who focuses on earthquake forecasting and seismic hazard modelling.

Matthew leads the New Zealand National Seismic Hazard Model (NSHM) - a scientific model that uses geodetic modelling and historical earthquake data to estimate the likelihood and strength of earthquake shaking in different parts of New Zealand. The NSHM is widely used by government and industry to estimate the likely impact of earthquakes on the country’s land, buildings and infrastructure.

In 2022 a significant revision of the model was released. This was a three-year project which helps to improve our understanding of risks to safety, security, and the economy from seismic events. Working in partnership with central and local government, engineers, universities and other Crown Research Institutes, and with input from international scientists and expert end users, the revision will lead to better management of, and responses to, natural hazard events, as well as influencing and improving infrastructure and building code legislation and requirements. This work will have ultimate benefits to the people of New Zealand.

During seismic events, he works alongside GNS Science’s earthquake forecasting team to provide forecasting data and probabilistic modelling to assist in the event response and recovery phases.

Before joining GNS, Matt worked on a range of seismology projects around the world, creating better understanding and quantification of uncertainties, developing testable models, methods for propagating uncertainties and forecasting and hazard models. He developed an aftershock hazard forecasting tool, which has been extensively used by the US Geological Survey and featured prominently in New Zealand’s response to the Canterbury earthquakes.

Matthew is a member of the New Zealand Society for Earthquake Engineering and an Associate Editor for the Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America.

  More

Less

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10   
  • Market Data
Close

Welcome to EconoTimes

Sign up for daily updates for the most important
stories unfolding in the global economy.