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Saskia Charity

Postdoctoral Research Associate, Particle Physics, University of Liverpool
I am a senior Research Associate in the Particle Physics group at the University of Liverpool. My research is focused on Muon Physics. In particular, I work on resolving the tension between the experimental and theoretical determinations of the muon anomalous magnetic moment. I have been working on the Fermilab muon g-2 experiment since 2014. After gaining my PhD from the University of Liverpool, where I built hardware and developed reconstruction algorithms for the g-2 tracking detectors, I moved to Fermilab as a Research Associate in the muon department. During my time working on g-2 I have been involved with many different aspects of the operations and analysis of the experiment. In my current role as magnetic field Analysis Coordinator, I analyze data from multiple systems to make an ultra-precise measurement of the muon-weighted magnetic field, which is one of the two main quantities required to determine the value of the muon anomalous magnetic moment. In 2022, I joined the University of Liverpool once again, to continue my work on g-2 as well as other muon experiments.

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Saskia Roberts

PhD Candidate, School of History, Australian National University
Saskia is a PhD Candidate in History at the Australian National University. She researches Australian teenage girls, intimate knowledge and print culture between 1970 and 2010. She is also a member of the Lilith: A Feminist History Journal editorial collective.

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Satish Kumar

Research Fellow, The Senator George J. Mitchell Institute for Global Peace, Security and Justice, Queen's University Belfast
Dr. M. Satish Kumar’s research has been to understand the production of colonial and postcolonial ordering of space. Currently, he is engaged with the challenges faced by cultural heritage due to rapid urban expansion, political conflict and climate change and natural disasters. Of particular interest is the role of cultural heritage in informing questions of marginalization, identity in a decolonialized world. This involves identifying the synergies of the physical and the human ecosystems.

Providing critical non-Eurocentric perspectives to questions of colonial and postcolonial development based on previous research on dignity, gender, values, sustainable human development and humanitarian competition, across the rural-urban divide.

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Saul Eslake

In 2016, Saul Eslake was appointed as the University of Tasmania's inaugural Vice-Chancellor’s Fellow. A focus of his efforts in the role will be the University’s Institute for the Study of Social Change, where he will provide advice and leadership on new research programs designed to analyse and address the social and economic challenges facing our local community and nation as a whole. His work also will centre upon the importance of education to Tasmania.

This is a part-time role; Saul is also an independent consulting economist.

Saul Eslake has worked as an economist in the Australian financial markets for 25 years, including 14 years as Chief Economist at the Australia & New Zealand Banking Group (ANZ).

After leaving ANZ in mid-2009, Saul was Director of the Productivity Growth program at the Grattan Institute, a non-aligned public policy 'think tank' affiliated with the University of Melbourne, and a part-time Advisor in PricewaterhouseCoopers' Economics & Policy practice.

From 2011 to 2015, Saul was Chief Economist at the Australian arm of Bank of America Merrill Lynch, before establishing a private consultancy in Tasmania.

Saul is a non-executive director of Hydro Tasmania (the Tasmanian state-owned electricity generator), and Chair of the Board of Ten Days on the Island (Tasmania's biennial multi-arts festival). He has previously been a member of the National Housing Supply Council and the Australian Statistics Advisory Committee; Chair of the Tasmanian Arts Advisory Board; and a non-executive director of the Australian Business Arts Foundation. He was also a member of the Howard Government's Foreign Affairs and Trade Policy Advisory Councils, and of the Rudd Government's Long-Term Tourism Strategy Steering Committee.

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Saul Lehrfreund

Visiting Professor, School of Law, University of Reading
Saul Lehrfreund is the co-founder and Co-Executive Director of The Death Penalty Project, an international human rights organisation based at Simons Muirhead & Burton solicitors in London. Saul specialises in constitutional and international human rights law and has represented prisoners under sentence of death before the domestic courts in the Commonwealth and international tribunals since the organization's inception in 1992. He has assisted lawyers in many countries (including Uganda, Nigeria, Malawi, Ghana, India and Malaysia) in constitutional cases concerning the death penalty and has participated in expert delegations to Japan, Taiwan, China and India.

In November 2000, Saul was awarded an MBE for services to international human rights law and in July 2009, he received an Honorary Degree of Doctor of Laws from the University of Reading.

He is a founder member of UK Foreign & Commonwealth Office Pro Bono Panel representing British Nationals facing the death penalty. Saul has published and lectured extensively on capital punishment and human rights to a wide range of audiences including the United Nations and the Council of Europe.

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Saverio Eric Spagnolie

Professor of Mathematics, University of Wisconsin-Madison
My interests lie at the interface between fluid and solid structures in soft biological matter. The dynamics of bodies immersed in fluids at small scales is of great practical and biological interest, but fluid interactions on such scales are inherently nonlocal so their analysis and even computation can still be very challenging. I approach problems in biological propulsion, cell mechanics, and fluid-body interaction systems using a number of techniques, from the application of classical methods of applied mathematics to the development of novel numerical methods.

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Savitri Taylor

Associate Professor, Law School, La Trobe University
Savitri Taylor's research over the past 30 years has focused on refugee law and asylum policy at the national, regional and international level.

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Sayonnha Mandal

Lecturer in Interdisciplinary Informatics, University of Nebraska Omaha
Dr. Sayonnha Mandal is a Lecturer of Cybersecurity in the College of Information Science and Technology at the University of Nebraska at Omaha (UNO). She received a Masters in Telecommunication Engineering from the University of Oklahoma and a Masters in Cybersecurity from UNO. Dr. Mandal earned her doctorate in Information Security from UNO, with a focus on software security requirements modeling and analysis. Her research interests include cybersecurity curriculum development, information security policy and governance and quantum cryptographic implementations. Moreover, she has experience in teaching a variety of cybersecurity courses at both the graduate and undergraduate levels including Digital forensics, Foundations of Cybersecurity, Intro to Cybersecurity, Cryptography, Security Policy and Awareness and Computer and Network Security.

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Scarlett Baron

Associate Professor in Department of English, UCL
Scarlett Baron took her B.A. (2003), M.St. (2005), and D.Phil. (2008) at Christ Church, Oxford.

She was affiliated to the École Normale Supérieure and the Institut des Textes et Manuscrits Modernes in Paris in 2006, and spent two months as a Scholar of the Zurich James Joyce Foundation in 2007.

She was a Research Fellow at Magdalen College, Oxford, from 2008 to 2011.

She joined UCL as a Teaching Fellow in 2011, assuming the role of Lecturer in 2012 and Associate Professor in 2018.

She is a member of the Advisory Board of the James Joyce Quarterly and a Trustee of the International James Joyce Foundation.

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Scarlett Howard

Lecturer, Monash University
Dr Scarlett Howard is a lecturer and research group leader in the School of Biological Sciences at Monash University. Her research spans cognition, behaviour, pollination, ecology, zoology, neurobiology, environmental change, and bio-inspired solutions. She predominantly works with bees and other insects to explore the cognitive abilities of miniature insect brains. Her work on honeybee cognition and pollination spans between collaborations across the world.

Scarlett has previously worked at the Centre for Integrative Ecology (CIE), School of Life and Environmental Sciences at Deakin University, the Bio-Inspired Digital Sensing (BIDS) Lab, School of Media and Communication at RMIT University, the School of BioSciences at the University of Melbourne, the Experience-Dependent Plasticity in Insects (EXPLAIN) Team in the Research Center on Animal Cognition (CRCA) with CNRS - Université Toulouse III - Paul Sabatier (Toulouse, France).

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Scott Bridges

Scott is a PhD candidate at the University of Canberra where he also teaches communications and journalism.

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Scott Cairney

Associate Professor of Psychology, University of York
I lead the Emotion Processing and Offline Consolidation (EPOC) Lab at the University of York. Our research addresses the mechanisms through which sleep disturbances give rise to mental health problems, with a focus on neurobiological perspectives. We use a range of methods to do this, including behavioural studies, sleep electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Our findings have helped us to better understand what goes wrong in the brains of people who are not sleeping well, and how we can target these impairments to improve the prospects of people at risk of psychiatric disorders.

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Scott Campbell

Constance F. and Arnold C. Pohs Professor of Telecommunication, University of Michigan

My research examines the social implications of new media, with an emphasis on mobile telephony. Current projects investigate how mobile communication patterns are linked to both the private and public spheres of social life, such as social networking and civic engagement. Several of these projects use a comparative approach to situate the role of mobile communication technology in the larger media landscape and across different societies.

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Scott Carver

Associate Professor, Wildlife Ecology, University of Tasmania
Scott joined the School of Biological Sciences at the University of Tasmania (UTAS) in 2012. He continues his research into disease transmission in puma, bobcats and domestic cats in North America, focussing on Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (an analogue for HIV in humans).

He has reengaged in mosquito-borne disease ecology in Australia, picking up where his PhD finished, with specific emphasis to understand the complex ecology and epidemiology of Ross River virus, particularly the role of marsupial hosts in human epidemic patterns. He has also established new research directions.

A major focus of his lab is studying sarcoptic mange, which is the most threatening disease of wombats in Australia, and infects >100 species of mammal globally. He collaborates and co-supervises students studying Tasmanian Devil Facial Tumour Disease. He also works closely with colleagues studying the epidemiology Chlamydial infections among agricultural animals and koala, and vaccine development.

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Scott Chiesa

Senior Research Fellow and Alzheimer's Research UK David Carr Fellow, UCL
I am a senior research fellow in the MRC Unit for Lifelong Health and Ageing at UCL. I hold a BSc(Hons) from the University of Glasgow, MSc from King's College London, and a PhD from Brunel University London. I am currently funded as an Alzheimer's Research UK David Carr Fellow researching early-life risk factors which may underlie the development of both cardiovascular disease and dementia.

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Scott Claessens

Postdoctoral Research Fellow, University of Auckland
I am a Postdoctoral Research Fellow in Psychology at the University of Auckland. I study cooperation and prosociality in humans, and how these behaviours relate to other aspects of our social lives, including politics and religion.

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Scott Davies

Professor, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto
My research has several branches. One examines trajectories of student achievement over several years. With various institutional partners I am compiling data sets that track students from their early years into post secondary levels, and to assess the impact of various interventions in reducing educational inequality. Another branch examines educational organizations, paying attention to the variety of school forms that are emerging at all levels of schooling, including various types of private schools and tutoring businesses, and various public schools of choice. In a third branch, I am attempting to contribute to sociological theories of education, variously interpreting how schooling and society have become more deeply ‘interpenetrated’ over time, charting different forms of cultural capital, and attempting to apply Interaction Ritual Theory to schooling.

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Scott Ewing

Scott Ewing is a Senior Research Fellow at the Swinburne Institute for Social Research and at the ARC Centre of Excellence in Creative Industries and Innovation. He has fifteen years experience as a social researcher, both at Swinburne and in the private sector. He is currently managing the Australian component of the World Internet Project, a global survey of internet use and non-use.

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Scott Hagan

Assistant Professor of Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Washington
Dr. Scott Hagan is an Assistant Professor of Medicine in the Department of Medicine at the University of Washington. He is a primary care physician with board certifications in Internal Medicine and Obesity Medicine. His research interests includes patient-centered obesity care, evidence-based medicine, and primary care quality improvement.

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Scott L Montgomery

Scott L. Montgomery is a university lecturer and author. His research and publications include areas in both the humanities and sciences, in particular history of science, intellectual history, language studies, and energy resources, technology, and security. He is the author, most recently, of Does Science Need a Global Language? (2013) and The Powers That Be: Global Energy for the Twenty-First Century and Beyond (2010). Forthcoming in 2015 are two works: Shape of the New: Four Ideas that Built the Modern World (with Daniel Chirot) and also A History of Science in World Cultures (with Alok Kumar).

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Scott Lucas

Scott Lucas became Professor of International Politics in 2014, having been on the staff of the University of Birmingham since 1989 and a Professor of American Studies since 1997.

He began his career as a specialist in US and British foreign policy, but his research interests now also cover current international affairs – especially North Africa, the Middle East, and Iran – New Media, and Intelligence Services.

A professional journalist since 1979, Professor Lucas is the founder and editor of EA WorldView, a leading website in daily news and analysis of Iran, Turkey, Syria, and the wider Middle East, as well as US foreign policy.

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Scott Malia

Associate Professor of Theatre, College of the Holy Cross
Scott Malia is an Associate Professor of Theatre and Chair of the Theatre & Dance Department at College of the Holy Cross, where he teaches courses on theatre, film and television, with an emphasis on LGBTQ+ identities and comedy.

His directorial credits include "She Kills Monsters," "The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time," "Middletown" and "Cloud 9." His plays "The Interview," "A Few Adjustments" and "Buffering" were featured in the Boston Theatre Marathon, and he has translated Carlo Goldoni’s "The Servant of Two Masters" into metered verse.

His writing has been featured in Theatre Journal and New England Theatre Journal, and his book, "Giorgio Strehler Directs Carlo Goldoni," was published by Lexington Press in 2013.

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Scott McGrane

Senior Lecturer in Environmental Change, Department of Economics, University of Strathclyde
I am a University of Strathclyde Chancellor's Fellow (Society and Policy) since May 2019, having originally joined the Department of Economics (Fraser of Allander Institute) at the University of Strathclyde in September 2017, working on a collaborative project alongside the Department of Physics and the Stanford Photonics Research Center.

My backrgound is in environmental science, though I pride myself in being a truly interdisciplinary researcher. My qualifications include an MA(Hons) in Geography and Environmental Science, and a Master of Research (MRes) in Civil Engineering, both from the University of Dundee. I completed my PhD at the University of Aberdeen in 2013 in catchment hydrology, undertaking research that explored the impacts of environmental perturbations on natural river dynamics in Scottish uplands.

My research interests have continued to address the impacts of environmental change on large river systems. Between 2013 and 2016 I worked as a research fellow in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Surrey, working on a NERC funded project that sought to assess and model the impacts of urbanisation and climate change on water quality in the Thames Basin. In 2016, I moved to the School of Mathematics & Statistics at the University of Glasgow, working on an EPSRC project that sought to determine the interlinkages and feedbacks that exist between water, energy and food systems in the UK.

I am the Honorary Treasurer (and executive committee member) for the British Hydrological Society. I also serve as an expert reviewer for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) for the upcoming Sixth Assessment Report, and I am part of the Position Statement authorship team for the American Geophysical Union, where I was recently involved in the determination of a climate change position statement for 2019.

My research investigates the role natural resources play in economic systems, and identifying the impacts of environmental change on economic sectors at a regional, national and international scale. Through my involvement with the Global Environmental Measurement and Monitoring (GEMM) Network at Strathclyde, I seek to explore how advances in earth observational technologies can better inform us on the likely impacts of climate change at a sub-national level, helping to drive the development of relative climate and environmental policies.

I am open to supporting PhD students that are interested in the role of the natural environment in economic systems, and undertaking transdisciplinary approaches to understanding the likely impacts of environmental change on human-environment systems (including economic impacts, health impacts, environmental system impacts and natural hazards).

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Scott Mooney

Associate professor, UNSW Sydney
A/Prof Scott Mooney is a geographer and palaeoecologist in the Earth and Sustainability Science Research Centre (and the School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences) at the University of New South Wales in Sydney. He has published more than 70 peer-reviewed scientific papers covering his interests in past climate change, human impact and palaeoenvironmental proxies (in particular, using charcoal to consider fire over hundreds to tens of thousands of years).

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Scott Peeples

In 26 years at the College of Charleston, Scott Peeples has taught a wide array of courses, with topics ranging from Gothicism to 19th-century American poetry to Bob Dylan. He has published extensively on Edgar Allan Poe and other 19th-century writers, most recently as author of The Man of the Crowd: Edgar Allan Poe and the City and as co-editor of The Oxford Handbook of Edgar Allan Poe. His essays have appeared in a wide range of academic and popular publications, including J19, Southern Cultures, Arizona Quarterly, Salon, and The Millions.

Dr. Peeples previously served as Chair of the English Department from 2012 to 2017. He is a past president of the Poe Studies Association and the Southeastern American Studies Association.

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Scott Phillips

Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, Boise State University
Scott Phillips is a full Professor in the Micron School of Materials Science & Engineering at Boise State University. He earned his Ph.D. from Paul A. Bartlett at UC Berkeley in 2004 and trained as a postdoctoral fellow in George Whitesides’ group (Harvard). He started his independent career at Penn State in 2008. His research interests include developing sustainable plastics, designing signal amplification reagents, and developing new classes of smart materials. Dr. Phillips’ awards include the NSF CAREER award, DARPA Young Faculty Award, Beckman Foundation Young Investigator Award, Eli Lilly and Company Young Investigator Award, the Arthur F. Findeis Award, and he held fellowships from the Alfred P. Sloan Research Foundation and the Camille & Henry Dreyfus Foundation.

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Scott Rick

Associate Professor of Marketing, University of Michigan
Scott Rick is an Associate Professor of Marketing at the University of Michigan's Ross School of Business. Rick received his PhD in Behavioral Decision Research from Carnegie Mellon in 2007, and he then spent two years as a post-doctoral fellow at Wharton. Rick's research focuses on understanding the emotional causes and consequences of consumer financial decision-making, with a particular interest in the behavior of tightwads and spendthrifts. The overarching goal of his work is to understand when and why consumers behave differently than they should behave (defined by an economically rational benchmark, a happiness-maximizing benchmark, or by how people think they should behave), and to develop marketing and policy interventions to improve consumers' decision making and well-being.

Rick has published in marketing, psychology, management, neuroscience, and economics journals, including the Journal of Consumer Research, the Journal of Marketing Research, the Journal of Consumer Psychology, Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, the Annual Review of Psychology, and Neuron. His research has been covered by media outlets such as the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, the Financial Times, the Washington Post, NPR, and Harvard Business Review. At Ross, he has won awards for both research and teaching.

He is the author of "Tightwads and Spendthrifts: Navigating the Money Minefield in Real Relationships," available in January 2024 from St. Martin’s Press.

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Scott Schang

Director of Environmental Law and Policy Clinic; Professor of Practice, Wake Forest University
Scott Schang is an expert on environmental law and governance. He is a Professor of Practice at Wake Forest where he directs the School's Environmental Law and Policy Clinic. He is also senior advisor on corporate engagement at Landesa, an international land rights NGO, where he advises on Landesa's work on responsible investment in land. He has extensive experience working with corporations, multilateral investment banks, international development agencies, international and local civil society partners, and community members in designing and implementing socially responsible practices and in designing and assessing the efficacy of environmental legal systems. He is past Acting President and Executive Vice President at the Environmental Law Institute, former Editor of the Environmental Law Reporter, and was in private practice with Cleary Gottlieb, and Latham & Watkins.

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Scott Smith

Associate Professor of Hospitality and Tourism Management, University of South Carolina
Scott Smith was born and raised in Orlando, Florida, and witnessed firsthand Orlando's growth from a small, relatively unknown town into the tourism giant that it is today. When Smith turned 16, he began his hospitality management career at Walt Disney World, where he continued to work throughout high school and college. After graduation from the University of Central Florida, he began his professional career with Marriott Hotels and held various positions in their hotel and resort division throughout the United States. Prior to his academic career, Smith also worked for Sheraton Hotels, Rosen Hotels, Walt Disney World, and Hilton Hotels in various management positions before returning to graduate school and completing his studies at the University of Central Florida's Rosen College of Hospitality Management. Smith currently holds a position with the University of South Carolina’s College of Hospitality, Retail and Sports Management as an assistant professor. Smith’s primary areas of research are pricing and revenue management in the hospitality industry. He also provides consulting to the hotel, resort and theme park industries.

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Scott Spillias

Postdoctoral Research Fellow, CSIRO

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Scott Stephenson

Associate Professor of Law, The University of Melbourne
Dr Scott Stephenson is an Associate Professor at Melbourne Law School, The University of Melbourne. After receiving his BA and LLB(Hons) with the University Medal in Law from the Australian National University, he worked at the High Court of Australia for two years, first as the Court’s Legal Research Officer and subsequently as Associate to Justice Virginia Bell AC. He then obtained his LLM and JSD from Yale University. He has held visiting positions at the University of Cambridge, University of Copenhagen, King’s College London and University of Oxford. He is the Treasurer and a Council Member of the Australian Association of Constitutional Law.

His research focuses on topics of Australian and comparative constitutional law and theory, including federalism, models of rights protection, the separation of powers, and the use of comparative materials. His book on the bills of rights in Australia, Canada, New Zealand and the United Kingdom, From Dialogue to Disagreement in Comparative Rights Constitutionalism, was awarded the Holt Prize in 2015. He has published in a number of leading Australian, Irish, UK, US and international journals, including the American Journal of Comparative Law, Dublin University Law Journal, Federal Law Review, International Journal of Constitutional Law, Melbourne University Law Review, Oxford Journal of Legal Studies and Sydney Law Review.

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Scott Vella

Researcher at CAP Crawford School of Public Policy, ANU National Security College, Australian National University

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Scott C. Ganz

Associate Teaching Professor of Business and Economics, Georgetown University
Scott C. Ganz is an associate teaching professor of strategy at Georgetown MSB and a research fellow in economic policy studies at the American Enterprise Institute. His research focuses on how organizations learn and, specifically, how organizational politics, hierarchy, and the design of decision-making institutions impact information aggregation, organizational adaptation, and organizational performance. He also write on public policy topics including business policy, healthcare policy, environmental policy, tax policy, and housing policy. His work is motivated by a common goal: get better information into the policy process so that decision makers can make better decisions.

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Scott Duke Kominers

Sarofim-Rock Professor of Business Administration, Harvard University

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Scott F. Kiesling

Professor of Linguistics, University of Pittsburgh
Scott Kiesling's research in sociolinguistics focuses on the areas of language and gender, style shifting and stance, ethnicity, language change, and social meaning in language. He is currently pursuing social meaning and language change in Pittsburgh speech, and is working on a pilot project on the development of awareness of social variation in small children (this is not a reference to his own small children!).

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