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Ozan Ozavci

Assistant Professor, Utrecht University
Dr Ozan Ozavci is Assistant Professor of Transimperial History at Utrecht University, the Netherlands and associate member at the Centre d’Études Turques, Ottomanes, Balkaniques et Centrasiatiques (CETOBaC, UMR 8032) in Paris. After completing his last book titled Dangerous Gifts: Imperialism, Security and Civil Wars in the Levant, 1798-1864 (Oxford University Press, 2021), he's currently working on a new manuscript on the intimate connections between peace-making and the capitulations at the turn of the nineteenth century. Dr Ozavci is co-convener of The Lausanne Project and the Security History Network.

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Pablo Calderon-Martinez

I am a Lecturer in Spanish at Aston University. My research focuses primarily on Spanish and Latin American (particularly Mexican) politics and social movements. Before moving to Aston, I was a Teaching Fellow in Spanish and European Studies at the Department of European and International Studies of King’s College London; I have also held academic positions in the Department of Political Economy at King’s College London and in the Politics and International Relations section at the New College of the Humanities.

I completed a PhD in Spanish and Mexican Politics at King’s College London in 2014, and I also hold an MSc in European Identities from the London School of Economics, and a BA in International Relations from ITESO University. Pablo has also held research positions at the Center for Advanced Study in the Social Sciences at the Juan March Institute in Madrid, and at the Department of International Relations at ITESO University. He has presented his research internationally, and has commented on Spanish, Latin American and European politics for the BBC, BBC World, CNBC, CNN, Canadian Television, The Independent, Monocle Radio, Voice of Russia, Share Radio and many other media outlets.

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Paige Coyne

PhD Candidate, Department of Kinesiology, University of Windsor
Paige Coyne (MHK) is a PhD candidate and active member of the Community Health, Environment, and Wellness laboratory in the Department of Kinesiology at the University of Windsor. She is a multidisciplinary researcher whose research interests lie in examining the physical, psychological, social, and environmental factors that impact health and other lifestyle behaviours, with a particular focus on social media.

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Paloma Trascasa-Castro

PhD Candidate in Climate Science, Barcelona Supercomputing Centre, University of Leeds
I am a postgraduate researcher looking at how different climate states modulate El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and its impacts. My supervisors are Dr Amanda Maycock (University of Leeds), Dr Yohan Ruprich-Robert (Barcelona Supercomputing Center) and Prof Piers Forster (University of Leeds).

I obtained my undergraduate degree in Environmental Science at the Universidad Autonoma de Madrid (Spain). My BSc dissertation was focused on understanding how large-scale climate variability such as the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) affects local climate and weather conditions in Madrid, with a special focus on the urban heat island effect and air pollution episodes. I did a year abroad at the Universidad Nacional de Colombia, where I developed my interest for ENSO and its impacts on ecosystems and populations.

In 2018 I enrolled in an MRes in climate and atmospheric science at the University of Leeds. My masters’ thesis was entitled “European climate response to El Niño-Southern Oscillation”, which later on was adapted and published in Journal of Climate. In 2019 I co-founded “The Climate Press”, an outreach project aimed to bring climate science closer to everyone. We’ve produced a number of podcasts and blogs that you can find here: www.theclimatepress.com

During the early stages of my PhD, I worked as a demonstrator in the masters’ modules “Physical Science Basis of Climate Change” and “Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation”.

I am particularly interested in large-scale climate variability. More specifically, the first part of my PhD project consists on understanding how the Atlantic Multidecadal Variability (AMV) modulates ENSO and its impacts. My future research includes assessing ENSO and its teleconnections under climate change conditions. I enjoy learning about all things climate-related, especially climate change projections, climate extremes, teleconnections, seasonal forecasts and climate variability in the troposphere and stratosphere.

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Pam Ramsden

Lecturer in Psychology, University of Bradford

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Pandora Patterson

Adjunct Associate Professor, Cancer Nursing Research Unit, University of Sydney

Dr Pandora Patterson is General Manager of Research, Evaluation and Social Policy at CanTeen and Adjunct Associate Professor in the Faculty of Nursing, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney.

She has worked for ten years as a researcher in the area of psycho-oncology with a particular interest in measure development and intervention based research for young people living with cancer. She is also a registered psychologist undertaking regular clinical work.

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Paris Stefanoudis

Senior Postdoctoral Researcher, University of Oxford
I am a marine biologist fascinated by the largest environment on planet Earth: the oceans.

My general research interests lie in documenting the distribution patterns of marine life in the oceans and identifying the underlying environmental factors shaping those. Part of my research portfolio has included biodiversity assessments of ultra-deep underwater mountains in the NE Atlantic, shallow and deep water reef biodiversity in Bermuda, conservation of threatened species and plastic pollution in the Thames Estuary.

At present, I am a postdoctoral researcher of the Marine Ecology and Conservation Group at the Department of Zoology, working closely with the NGO Nekton. My main research focus lies in assessing biodiversity and faunal connectivity across depth and geography in tropical reef ecosystems, and assess the impact of human activities on them. For that, I am participating in a series of Missions in the Indian Ocean led by Nekton, known as First Descent: Indian Ocean 2019-2022.

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Park Thaichon

Assistant Professor of Marketing, S P Jain School of Global Management

My main research interests include Dark Marketing, Consumer Behaviour, Relationship Marketing and Integrated Marketing Communications. I am currently serves as an editorial board member for the Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics and the International Journal of Trade and Global Markets.

My research has been published in leading marketing journals including but not limited to the Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Journal of Business and Industrial Marketing, Journal of Strategic Marketing, Journal of Relationship Marketing, Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, International Journal of Bank Marketing, International Journal of Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Marketing, and Services Marketing Quarterly.

The fundamental aim of my research is for a better tomorrow. I wish that my current and future research would contribute to the overall benefits and well-being of the society.

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Parveen Akhtar

Dr Parveen Akhtar joined the University of Bradford as a lecturer in January 2014. Prior to this she was awarded a British Academy Research Fellowship, held at the University of Bristol (2011-2013). In 2010 she was a visiting scholar at Lahore University of Management Sciences before which she was an ESRC postdoctoral fellow at the University of Bristol (2008-2009).

Dr Akhtar completed her ESRC funded PhD at the University of Birmingham (2008) during which time she held research positions at the Institut für die Wissenschaften vom Menschen Institute for Human Sciences, Vienna (2007); the Institute for Migraiton and Ethnic Studies, Amsterdam (2006); Sciences Po, Paris (2006) and the School for Postgraduate Interdisciplinary Research on Interculturalism and Transnationalism, Aalborg (2005).

Dr Akhtar has published widely on Political Participation, Islam, Migration and Social Change in journals including; the British Journal of Politics and International Relations, the Political Quarterly and European Political Science. Her monograph, British Muslims Politics, was published by Palgrave in 2013. Dr Akhtar’s work has an international audience and she has presented her research in over 40 conferences in 15 countries. She makes regular contributions to public and media debates.

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Pat McConnell

Honorary Fellow, Macquarie University Applied Finance Centre, Macquarie University

After over 30 years working for, and consulting to, major banking and insurance companies in the US, Europe and Australia, Pat transferred to teaching courses in Risk Management at Masters level and to industry. His main areas of research are in Operational Risk (People, Systems, Process and Legal risks) and banking regulation and he has published widely on this topic, including a new book on People Risk Management http://www.koganpage.com/product/people-risk-management-9780749471354 .

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Patricia Hogwood

I am a Reader in European Politics in the Department of Politics and International Relations (DPIR). I completed my PhD in European Studies at the University of Bradford and taught at the universities of Strathclyde, Edinburgh and Glasgow before coming to the University of Westminster in 2004. I work in the fields of comparative European politics and European Union politics, specialising in German politics, political identity and internal security.

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Patrick Bixby

Associate Professor of English, Arizona State University
Patrick Bixby (he/him/his) is an associate professor of English in the New College of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences at Arizona State University.

After earning a BA in psychology from the University of California, Los Angeles and a MA in English from California State University, Long Beach, Bixby completed his PhD in English at Emory University in 2003. He served as visiting assistant professor of literature at Claremont McKenna College for one year and then joined the faculty of ASU’s New College, where he has held a number of posts. In 2017, after directing several graduate programs and then serving as director of graduate studies for the college, he took a role building partnerships between the university and Arizona tribal communities, as well as other universities around the globe. Most recently, in 2021, he became the program lead for the BA in Disability Studies. In addition to these duties, he currently serves as vice president of the Samuel Beckett Society and resident director of the USAC summer school program at NUI Galway.

Bixby's scholarly interests span a variety of fields, including Irish studies, modernist studies, postcolonial theory and criticism, Continental philosophy, and issues of travel, mobility, and the body. He teaches courses in these fields and in the history of the novel, the history of film, the history of literary criticism, twentieth-century thought, postmodernism, and methods of interdisciplinary research.

His essays have appeared in journals such as Modernism/Modernity, Modernist Cultures, Irish Studies Review, and the Journal of Beckett Studies, as well as in collections such as A History of Irish Modernism (Cambridge UP, 2019), A History of the Modernist Novel (Cambridge UP, 2015), Beckett in Context (Cambridge UP, 2013), and Beckett and Ireland (Cambridge UP, 2010).

Bixby's latest book, License to Travel: A Cultural History of the Passport (U of California P, 2022), investigates the unyielding paradox of the document: even as it promises independence and mobility, escape and safe haven, the passport also serves as an essential tool of government surveillance and state power, purportedly assuring homeland security and the controlled movement of individuals across national boundaries. The study investigates this paradox by drawing on a range of sources, including literary history and modern art, archival documents and contemporary journalism, international law and theories of cosmopolitanism.

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Patrick D. Nunn

Professor of Geography, Sustainability Research Centre, University of the Sunshine Coast
After 30 years of research, mostly focused in the Asia-Pacific region, Professor Nunn has accumulated a degree of expertise in a number of different fields. His primary field is geography, once largely physical in focus, but now straddling various aspects of sustainability. Professor Nunn has worked for a number of years in climate change, mostly on sea level and on the challenges of effective adaptation in poorer countries. He has also worked on archaeological topics, usually through the lens of palaeoenvironment reconstruction, but also applying his geological training to ceramic mineralogy and radiocarbon chronology. Since 2000, when a coup in Fiji interrupted a planned research programme, Professor Nunn became interested in myths as potential sources of information about geological hazards, particularly earthquakes and tsunamis, volcanic eruptions and abrupt coastal change.


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Patrick Degenaar

Reader in Neuroprosthesis, Newcastle University

I am a reader in biomedical engineering and came to Newcastle in 2010 to develop world class collaborations between the school of EEE and the Institute of Neuroscience. I have a BSc (1st class) and MRes in applied physics from Liverpool University, and a PhD in bioimaging from the Japan Advanced Institute for Science and Technology. After some time in the software industry, I did two post-doctoral projects at Imperial College before getting an RCUK fellowship in 2005. From 2005-2010 I was a lecturer and then senior lecturer in Imperial College, before coming to Newcastle. In my time I have had numerous research awards and published numerous papers in the key journals in the biomedical field.

At the heart of these efforts is my pioneering use of CMOS-micro-LED optoelectronics in combination with optogenetic gene therapy solutions. These will lead to highly advanced forms of prosthetic intervention not previously possible. This has led to a number of highly cited papers in key biomedical engineering journals. Furthermore I have explored impact through patient trials and commercial translation.

To achieve my aims I have been part of a number of large research consortia. Between 2010-2014 I coordinated the FP7 OptoNeuro project. More recently I am the engineering team leader on the £10M CANDO project to develop a next-generation prosthesis for epilepsy. Currently I have a large highly dedicated team of RAs, and PhD students.

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Patrick Shafto

I am Henry Rutgers Term Chair in Data Science and Associate Professor in the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science at Rutgers - Newark. I am also affiliated with the Institute for Data Science, Learning and Applications (I-DSLA) and have appointments in Psychology, Rutgers Business School, and the Center for Molecular and Behavioral Neuroscience (CMBN) at Rutgers.

I lead the CoDaS lab. The goal of my research is to bridge Cognitive Science and Data Science by understanding human perception and cognition and developing more cognitively natural machine learning and data science tools.

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Patrick Stokes

I'm a philosopher at Deakin University, and have previously held research fellowships in the UK (I'm an honorary Research Fellow at the University of Hertfordshire), Denmark and the US.

My areas of research include personal identity, philosophy of death and remembrance, 19th and 20th century European philosophy (especially the work of Søren Kierkegaard) and moral psychology.

As well as The Conversation, I'm a regular contributor to New Philosopher and pop up from time to time on The Drum, 774 Melbourne, 3RRR, Radio National, The Age, and other places.

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Patryk Szewczyk

Patryk is a security lecturer at Edith Cowan University and a member of the ECU Security Research Institute.

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Paul Anand

I have held fellowships in Oxford and Cambridge Universities and am currently a Professor at the Open University, Research Associate at Oxford University and the London School of Economics.

My work stems from long standing interests in the foundations of decision sciences, used to be primarily normative, and have argued for the expansion of decision theory beyond older conceptions of rational choice, something that has, broadly speaking, taken place both in economics and philosophy. In recent years, I have been interested in the operationalisation of Sen’s capabilities approach to welfare economics and its use in debates about the measurement of progress.

Earlier work has been published in a variety of leading economics journals including The Economic Journal, Theory and Decision, Oxford Economic Papers, Economica, Journal of Health Economics, Annals of Operations Research and much of it is collected in my monograph Foundations of Rational Choice Under Risk published by Oxford University Press in 1993 (with reprints in 1995 and 2002). In addition, I have just edited and contributed to the Oxford University Press Handbook of Rational and Social Choice with Professor Prasanta Pattanaik (Riverside, University of California, USA) and Professor Clemens Puppe (Karlsruhe University, Germany) to be published in 2008. Work on capabilities and wellbeing is summarised in greater detail on the capabilities measurement project website.

I have also been interested in the interaction these theories and their development in policy contexts or experimental and survey based work. This work has been published in a wide variety of scientific journals including Science, Journal of Theoretical Politics, British Journal of Management, Social Theory and Practice, Social Indicators Research, Health Care Analysis and the Journal of Economic Psychology.

Having taught research methods at graduate level for five years and acted as a consultant researcher on economic statistics to the OECD and NAO my most recent work brings a these interests together with interests in the foundations of social choice. With about 25 colleagues, at the latest count, I have sought to demonstrate the extent to which the measurement of human capabilities is feasible along multiple dimensions and explore the techniques that can be applied to such measurements. This work has resulted in approximately a dozen publications and has been incorporated into research projects in Oxford, Glasgow and Buenos Aires.

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Paul Dimeo

Senior Lecturer in Sport, University of Stirling

My main areas of research interest and expertise relate to drug use in sport and anti-doping policy.

I was a visiting Fulbright Commission Scholar at the University of Texas, Austin from September to December 2012, working on a project entitled: ‘The Doping of Elite Athletes in International Sport and the Politics of the Cold War, 1950-1990'.

I am the co-ordinator of SPS9SP Sports Policy. I also contribute to SPS9R7 Readings in Sports Studies, SPS9D8 Sports Dissertation and dissertation supervision.

My major research interest is doping in sport and the development of anti-doping policies. This has led to several publications including the prize-winning monograph A History of Drug Use in Sport, 1876-1976: Beyond Good and Evil (Routledge, 2007). I have recently completed three projects funded by the World Anti-Doping Agency. I have published on other policy issues including racism in sport, the migration of football players, tourism, and hosting major sports events.

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Paul Docherty

Paul's research interests lie in empirical finance and capital markets, focusing primarily on asset pricing. His research has been published in journals including Accounting and Finance, Applied Economics and The Australian Journal of Management.

He is the chief investigator for a large external grant that was awarded by Platypus Asset Management in 2011 and continues to work collaboratively with professionals in the funds management industry.

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Paul Heywood

Paul Heywood graduated with an MA in Politics (First Class) from the University of Edinburgh, then did postgraduate studies in Madrid and at the LSE, from where he received his MSc(Econ) and PhD (Politics). Before joining the University of Nottingham, he taught at the University of Glasgow and at the University of London. He also worked for the Economist Intelligence Unit, London (1989-93). He has been a member of the ESRC Research Grants Board (2001-05) and was Dean of the University of Nottingham Graduate School from 2003-07. He is currently Director of the University of Nottingham’s ESRC Doctoral Training Centre, which supports research students in the social sciences. Between 2003 and 2009 he was co-editor of the international journal Government and Opposition, and is currently Chair of the Board of Directors. Professor Heywood is author, co-author or editor of fifteen books and more than eighty journal articles and book chapters. His research focuses on political corruption, institutional design and state capacity in contemporary Europe. In 2006, he was appointed Adjunct Professor at the University of Hunan (China), where he is Senior Adviser to the Center for Clean Governance. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts (elected 2002), and an Academician of the Academy of Social Sciences (elected 2012).

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Paul Hodkinson

Professor of Sociology, University of Surrey
Paul Hodkinson is Professor of Sociology at the University of Surrey. His research focuses on fathers and fathering, youth cultures, pathways through adulthood and experiences of digital social media spaces. He is particularly interested in understanding people's experiences of contemporary life course journeys and transitions.

His books include 'New Fathers, Mental Health and Digital Communication' (with Ranjana Das), 'Sharing Care: Equal and Primary Carer Fathers and Early Years Parenting' (with Rachel Brooks), 'Media, Culture and Society', 'Ageing and Youth Cultures' (with Andy Bennett), 'Youth Cultures: Scenes, Subcultures and Tribes' (with Wolfgang Deicke) and 'Goth: Identity, Style and Subculture'.

He is currently co-editor of the journal, Sociology, and was previously co-editor of Sociological Research Online.

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Paul Kennedy

Dr Paul Kennedy joined the Department in 2000, having previously lectured in the Department of European Studies at Loughborough University.

He graduated from the University of Sheffield and completed his doctoral thesis on the Spanish Socialist Government of 1982-1996 at Cardiff University.

Previously he had worked at the Foreign and Commonwealth Office.

His monograph entitled 'The Spanish Socialist Party and the modernisation of Spain' was published by Manchester University Press in 2013.

His research interests focus on contemporary Spanish history and politics.

His most recent work has considered the impact of the international economic crisis on Spain, related articles considering the Spanish Socialist Government’s amendment of the 1978 Constitution in 2011, and the impact of the Popular Party Government’s 2012 Labour Reform.

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Paul Lashmar

Dr Paul Lashmar joined Sussex in October 2015 as a Senior Lecturer and he is also an investigative journalist and research academic.

Prior to Sussex he was at Brunel University. His PhD is on the links between the intelligence services and the media, which is his core research interest.

Paul is a highly regarded investigative journalist and has worked in television, radio and print. He has been on the staff of The Observer, Granada Television’s World in Action current affairs series and The Independent. He has also produced a number of TV programmes for BBC’s Timewatch and Channel 4’s Dispatches series and is the author of three books and a chapter in ‘Investigative Journalism: Context & Theory’ (2008).

He covered the ‘War on Terror’ for the Independent on Sunday from 2001-2008.

He was awarded ‘Reporter of The Year’ in the 1986 UK Press Awards. Paul has written about terrorism, intelligence, organised crime, offshore crime, business fraud and the Cold War and has broken many major domestic and international stories. He is an adviser to the Centre for Investigative Journalism. Often interviewed on radio about these and other subjects.

An adviser to the Centre for Investigative Journalism at City University.

His full CV can be found at www.paullashmar.com

Specialist in journalism education and training

Current research interests:

* The British Press and the EU
* Moral Panics and the Journalist
* Information flow between intelligence agencies and the news media
* The relationship between reporters and their audience
* Excellence in Journalism Practice
* Socio-economic diversity in journalism
* Journalism and war on terror
* Journalism and organised crime
* Online media entrepreneurialism

Forthcoming book. Multimedia Journalism. Co-author with Steve Hill (Solent University) Sage Publications. Due publication Sept 2013. This book is a synthesis of theory and practice and includes interviews with practitioners.

June 2013 - Paul has a chapter "Journalist, Folk Devil?" in Moral Panics in the Contemporary World. (Eds: Critcher, Hughes, Petley and Rohloff). London: Bloomsbury. Moral panic theorists say the media are central to the 40 year old and popular concept, but in this chapter Paul Lashmar challenges the model observing that no research into actual journalism practice on stories deemed moral panics has previously been undertaken.

From July 2011 Paul has been Honorary Editor for the Proceedings of the Dorset Natural History and Archaeological Society (DNHAS). The Proceedings is an annual semi-scholarly publication that has been published since 1870s. The first volume (133) under Paul's editorship has been available since November 2012. For more details contact Dorset County Museum. The index and details of Proceedings can be found here.

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Paul Lasky

Lecturer, Monash University

Paul is a lecturer at Monash University. He is interested in everything related to gravitational physics and Einstein's theory of relativity, and is involved in a variety of research topics such as neutron star and black hole physics, gravitational waves, cosmology, gravitational lensing and alternative theories of gravity. As a member of both the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO) Scientific Collaboration, and the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array collaboration he is contributing to the global gravitational wave detection effort by modelling gravitational wave sources and developing data analysis search algorithms.

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Paul Levy

Paul is author of the new book Digital Inferno (launched in 2015). He is a writer, researcher (at the Centre for Research in Innovation Management, CENTRIM, University of Brighton), facilitator and collusion breaker. Paul also co-authored the books Technosophy and E:Quality. He has written articles for journals, conference, newspapers and magazines. You can visit his other web sites at: http://rationalmadness.wordpress.com/ and http://digitalinferno.wordpress.com/ where you can find most of his writings.

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Paul Loh

Lecturer in digital architecture design, University of Melbourne

Paul Loh is lecturer in Digital Architecture design at the University of Melbourne. Prior to this Paul studied architecture at the University of Melbourne and University of East London before joining the Design Research Lab at the Architectural Association where he completed his Master in Architecture and Urbanism. He has over 12 years of practice experience in London, Melbourne and Kuala Lumpur. Paul was senior lecturer at the University of East London between 2005 and 2011. He has taught at the Architectural Association and lectured in UK, Sweden, Italy and China. He is a partner of Melbourne based design practice LLDS / Power To Make, focusing on the relationship between making, technology and material. Paul is a PhD candidate at SIAL RMIT. His main research interest is digital fabrication and craft formation in computational design.

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Paul Mulvaney

I am a Professor of Chemistry at the University of Melbourne. I am interested in nanoscale materials and the use of these novel materials in new technologies such as solar cells.

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Paul Nieuwenhuis

Paul Nieuwenhuis was born in the Netherlands and studied in Australia, Belgium, Spain and Scotland, where he obtained his PhD from Edinburgh University. After a spell in consultancy, carrying out projects for most of the world’s car and truck makers and acting as a special advisor on state aid in the automotive industry to the European Commission (DGIV), he joined the Centre for Automotive Industry Research (CAIR) at Cardiff University in 1990.

CAIR specialises in the economic and strategic aspects of the world automotive sector, giving it a rare overview of the industry. The centre has attracted contracts from car manufacturers, suppliers and governments, world-wide. Here he also developed his special interest in the problems of making personal mobility compatible with the need for sustainability. In 2001 he became a founder member of the ESRC-funded Centre for Business Responsibility, Accountability, Sustainability and Society (BRASS) at Cardiff University.

He co-created an innovative course in Motoring Journalism together with the highly regarded Cardiff University School of Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies and is also a director – in partnership with colleagues at the Cardiff School of Engineering – of the Electric Vehicle Centre of Excellence at Cardiff University.

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Paul Plummer

Professor in Rail Strategy, University of Birmingham
Former CEO, board director and economist with experience in policy, business strategy, transport, infrastructure and change. Now using that experience as a professor, non-executive director and mentor to help individuals or organisations make a difference in areas which matter for our society.

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Paul Rogers

Professor of Peace Studies, University of Bradford

Paul Rogers continues his work on trends in international conflict with a particular focus on the interactions of socio-economic divisions and environmental constraints. Within this area of study he works on issues such as the politics of energy resource use and the impact of climate change on international security. He has a particular research interest in radicalisation and political violence. His regional emphasis is primarily on the Middle East and South Asia and his work on sustainable security links with Oxford Research Group. He is also involved in a new pilot project for the Network for Social Change on “Remote Control” – the use of armed drones, Special Forces, privatised military companies and other forces to maintain control, raising issues of ethical behaviour, accountability, precedent-setting and and risk of proliferation. In the past, Paul lectured at Imperial College and was a Senior Scientific Office in Kenya and Uganda.

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Paul Rosenzweig

After graduating law school Mr. Rosenzweig clerked for Judge R. Lanier Anderson, III of the United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit. Since then he has held positions working in all three branches of the Federal government, most recently (from 2005-09) as the first Deputy Assistant Secretary for Policy at the Department of Homeland Security.

He is a Senior Editor of the Journal of National Security Law and Policy and as a member of the Advisory Committee to the ABA’s Standing Committee on Law and National Security. He also serves on the District of Columbia Bar’s ethics Rules Review Committee and has a private practice within the District.

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Paul Roundy

Dr. Roundy studies waves of the tropical atmosphere and ocean and how these waves interact with one another and with atmospheric moist deep convection to modulate global weather and climate. Areas of emphasis include analysis of observations to study modulation of tropical cyclogenesis and the El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) by convectively coupled waves and intraseasonal oscillations.

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Paul Watson

Paul Watson is Professor of Computer Science and Director of the Digital Institute. He is PI of the EPSRC Centre for Doctoral Training in Cloud Computing for Big Data and also directed the £12M RCUK-funded Digital Economy Hub on Social Inclusion through the Digital Economy. He graduated in 1983 with a BSc in Computer Engineering from Manchester University, followed by a PhD on parallel graph reduction in 1986. In the 80s, as a Lecturer at Manchester University, he was a designer of the Alvey Flagship and Esprit EDS systems. From 1990-5 he worked for ICL as a system designer of the Goldrush MegaServer parallel database server, which was released as a product in 1994.

In August 1995 he moved to Newcastle University, where he has been an investigator on research projects worth over £40M. His research interest is in scalable information management with a current focus on Cloud Computing. He sits on the board of Dynamo North East, an industry-led organisation created to grow the IT economy of the region. Professor Watson is a Chartered Engineer, a Fellow of the British Computer Society, and a member of the UK Computing Research Committee. He received the 2014 Jim Gray eScience Award.

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Paul Whiteley

Professor, Department of Government, University of Essex

My research interests involve examining the nature & significance of political participation, particularly electoral participation, & also in understanding the causes & effects of public opinion on politics.

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