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Elisa Borah

Research Associate, University of Texas at Austin

Elisa V. Borah, MSW, PhD is a research associate at The University of Texas School of Social Work at Austin within the Texas Institute for Excellence in Mental Health. She is currently principal investigator of an Engagement Award from the Patient Centered Outcome Research Institute to develop a network of veteran spouses that facilitates their involvement in research related to veteran families. In 2015, Borah served as the lead evaluator of Texas' statewide veterans’ mental health services, specifically examining the Texas Military Veteran Peer Network. Borah co-chairs the annual Military Social Work conference at The University of Texas at Austin. From 2010-2014, Borah served as director of research at the Fort Hood clinic of the Department of Defense-funded STRONG STAR PSD Research Consortium, at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. Borah continues to study how to improve veterans and their families' access to evidence-based behavioral health treatments in community mental health settings.

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Elisabeth Kramer

Scientia Senior Lecturer in Politics and Public Policy, UNSW Sydney

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Elise Berlinski

I am currently an assistant professor at Copenhagen Business School, that I joined in October 2021, after obtaining my PhD degree in management science at ESCP Business School in management sciences. My research develops around two streams. One stream focuses on the organizing mechanisms of internet platforms and social media, and the mechanisms by which cross-platform organizations emerge, such as social movements, that I studied through the case of QAnon, the conspiratorial social movement. Another stream is interested in the manner by which artificial intelligence (AI) shapes organizations and society, focusing specifically on the socio-technical imaginaries of AI.
Originally, I a trained engineer, I hold a master degree (2013) from a French Grande École, ENSIMAG, and carried my last year at Imperial College (mathematics department). During my studies, I carried two research internships, one at INRIA in bioinformatics (4 months), and one at Imperial Colleger in the Electrical and Electronic Engineering Department in theoretical machine learning (6 months).
From 2013 until 2017 I worked in industry as a data scientist and a quantitative analyst.

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Elise Canning

FluxLab Researcher, St. Francis Xavier University

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Elisha Chiware

Library Director and Associate Professor, Cape Peninsula University of Technology
Dr. Elisha Chiware is the Director of Cape Peninsula University of Technology Libraries in Cape Town, South Africa. Elisha has also served as the Secretary of IATUL (International Association of University Libraries Board). Dr. Chiware has worked in libraries and LIS schools in Namibia, Botswana, South Africa and Zimbabwe. He has also worked as an international information management consultant – establishing trade information centres in the East, South and Central African regions.

He holds a BA (Economics and Political Science) from the University of Zimbabwe, a Master of Library Science from Indiana University (Bloomington) and DPhil Information Science from the University of Pretoria.

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Elisha Josev

Senior Research Officer and Paediatric Clinical Neuropsychologist, Murdoch Children's Research Institute
Dr Elisha Josev is a Senior Research Officer at the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute, and an Honorary Research Fellow in the Department of Paediatrics at the University of Melbourne. She is also a practicing Paediatric Clinical Neuropsychologist. Dr Josev has a special interest in the neuropsychological and neurological effects of disruption to normal brain development, and the impact of chronic health conditions on adolescent brain functioning and behaviour. She currently coordinates the Paediatric Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) Research Program at the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute.

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Elita Chamdimba

Research fellow, Centre for Social Research, University of Malawi
Elita Chamdimba is a Sociologist / Social Work expert who since 2018, has been a Research Fellow at the University of Malawi’s Centre for Social Research (CSR). Elita is currently studying for her PhD in Social Work at University of Strathclyde, Glasgow. She’s also the founder and former director (2014 - 2022) of Little Big Prints, a youth organization in Zomba (southern Malawi) equipping and supporting adolescent girls in rural secondary schools.

Elita's work and research interests focus on the lived experiences of adolescents on the margin (such as adolescents with albinism, adolescent mothers and girls in chid marriage in Malawi). She has applied participatory approaches for exploring adolescent's sense of belonging, social connectedness and identity. Elita’s areas of expertise expand to girls’ education, youth at risk, and intra-household power dynamics.

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Elizabeth Aries

Professor of Psychology, Amherst College
I received my Ph.D. in social psychology from Harvard University in 1973. I joined the faculty at Amherst College in 1975 where I am currently the Clarence Francis (1910) Professor in Social Sciences (Psychology). For my first 20 years at Amherst College, my research interests focused on gender and communication. I authored Men and Women in Interaction: Reconsidering the Differences (Oxford University Press, 1996). My research interests shifted to issues of race and class. I carried out 12-year interview study of affluent Black, affluent white, lower-income Black, and lower-income white students of Amherst College looking at the challenges they faced on campus due to their race and class and what they learned from the race and class diversity in the student body. I completed two books about their college experiences and learning: Race and Class Matters at an Elite College (Temple University Press, 2008) and Speaking of Race and Class: The Student Experience at an Elite College (Temple University Press, 2013). I did follow-up interviews with the participants at age 30 examining participants' reflections on what they learned from exposure to race and class diversity during college and how that learning has impacted their lives. My new book, The Impact of College Diversity: Struggles and Successes at Age 30 will be published by Temple University Press in April, 2023.

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Elizabeth Baldwin1

Associate, Grattan Institute

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Elizabeth Besha

Dr. Elizabeth Basha, a graduate of both Pacific and MIT, joined the Pacific faculty in Fall 2010. Professor Basha recently received a National Science Foundation (NSF) award for a project in collaboration with the University of Nebraska, Lincoln. The three-year grant will investigate the use of aerial robotics to wirelessly transfer power to maintain sensor network systems. This project builds the power transfer system, develops algorithms for selecting nodes to recharge on both the UAV and sensor network side, and extends power management solutions on the sensor networks.UAV - Bridge

This research introduces novel recharging systems and algorithms to supplement existing systems and lead to autonomous, sustainable energy management on sensor networks. Applications such as bridge fault detection that rely on sensor networks operating away from buildings often lack energy for long-term monitoring. In these scenarios, traditional recharging methods (e.g. solar panels) are unavailable or cannot provide sufficient energy (e.g. at night).

Dr. Basha has also created a new graduate course in robotics that began in Spring 2013, along with an undergraduate version that launched in Spring 2014. This three-year grant has also supported our Masters Program with MSES students contributing to the research as well as completing thesis on this project. Interested undergraduate students have also been able to contribute to the research on this project.

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Elizabeth Bryan

Senior Scientist, Natural Resources and Resilience Unit, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)
Elizabeth Bryan is a Senior Scientist at the International Food Policy Research Institute, where she conducts policy-relevant research on gender, sustainable agricultural production, climate-smart agriculture, small-scale irrigation and natural resource management using mixed methods. She has considerable experience integrating gender into large, interdisciplinary research programs involving multiple CGIAR centers and other partners. Bryan is skilled at analyzing quantitative and qualitative data for gender research, has published numerous articles based on her work and regularly presents research results to diverse audiences, including at policy workshops, trainings and international conferences. She holds doctorate in Agricultural Sciences from the University of Hohenheim, an M.A. in Development Economics from American University, and a B.A. from Wagner College.

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Elizabeth Crawford Spencer

Elizabeth Spencer, BS, MCRP, JD, PhD, is a lawyer and urban and regional planner. Having served in academic and managerial positions at Southern Methodist, Bond, Australian Catholic, James Cook and Charles Darwin Universities, she currently serves as Professor of Law with Charles Darwin University and Adjunct Professor with James Cook University.  She has taught across the law curriculum; her subject areas include contracts; torts; corporations; business law; international trade law; Australian legal system; legal research, writing and analysis; competition law; and commercial regulation.   A member of the Texas State Bar since 1997, Liz practiced law in the United States before moving to The Netherlands, where she worked as a managing editor for Kluwer Law International and at the International Court of Justice. Liz has professional experience in the private and not-for-profit sectors in Australia, the US, Europe and SE Asia. She also has formal training and experience in facilitation, negotiation and mediation.

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Elizabeth Follett

Royal Academy of Engineering Research Fellow, University of Liverpool

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Elizabeth Handsley

Adjunct Professor of Law, Western Sydney University
I am a legal academic specialising in children's rights and media law. I am also the President of Children and Media Australia (www.childrenandmedia.org.au), and the co-host of Outside the Screen, a podcast all about screens in the lives of children and families (https://outsidethescreen.substack.com/podcast).

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Elizabeth Hinds-Hueglin

Research Associate in English and Writing Studies, Western University
Masters thesis: Heritage landscapes in Kingston, Ontario: An erasure of African Canadian history

A Research Associate in the Department of English and Writing Studies at Western University. A Queen's University graduate with a Master of Arts degree, Bachelor of Arts (Honours) degree and Bachelor of Education degree. Possesses extensive knowledge in human geography, public memory, critical race theory and inclusive education strategies. Engages with the conceptual and theoretical perspectives in the sub-discipline of black geographies.

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Elizabeth Kealy-Morris

Senior Lecturer in Dress and Belonging, Manchester Fashion Institute, Manchester Metropolitan University
I am a senior lecturer in Dress and Belonging at Manchester Fashion Institute. Originally from the States, I worked in printing and publishing in NYC before settling in Manchester, UK. I lecture across fashion studies subjects including critical theory, brand development, marketing principals, and graphic communication practice for fashion. I am associate editor of the journal Fashion, Style and Popular Culture, an imprint of Intellect Books.

My research is multidisciplinary in nature. I seek connections between cultural memory, autoethnography, human geography, dress, identity, disability, belonging and wellness. I co-organised and co-led the January 2021 international symposium Face Off: The Provocation and Possibilities of Masks and Head Coverings which emerged from my interest in how society changed and adapted through the wearing of the COVID face masks during the pandemic. My paper for the conference, ‘Who is the Sick One Here: Mask Refusal and Ambivalent Social Identity in COVID America’, explored the links between American cultural memory of ‘The Frontier’ and the cultural trope of ‘Pioneer Spirit’ in the visceral rejection of the COVID medical mask as a symbol of fragility and sickness. This will soon be published as a chapter in an edited Intellect Books volume. I am guest editor of the Fashion, Style and Popular Culture Special Issue, 'Dressing through Pandemics'.

I co-edited the Bloomsbury volume Memories of Dress: Recollections of Material Identities (2023). Her solo chapter, 'The American Look: Memories of Not Fitting In', introduced the term ‘body dressing work’ to articulate my experience negotiating the social norms and expectations of clothing the suburban American female body with the anxiety of living with a spinal deformity and was highlighted in The Guardian (2022).

I have developed the concept of 'cultural memory of dress' where national popular history and popular culture are woven as narratives into clothing tastes and styles. This is explored in my Bloomsbury solo chapter (above) and the publications “The American Look”: The transformation of women’s sportswear in 1930s and 1940s America’ (2023) and 'The Shift Dress as Cultural Meaning' (2018).

I am also interested in the ways in which collaborative learning enhances students' creativity, self-confidence, and sense of self. My practice-based doctorate, The Artist’s Book: Making as embodied knowledge of practice and the self, considered the role of creativity and the pedagogy of making in the development of identity via working through personal and cultural memory with visual practice.

Since 2020 I have collaborated yearly with colleagues from Pearl Academy in Delhi and Mumbai to develop 'The Global Artisan Project', a collaborative online international learning (COIL) project. This co-creative project connects undergraduate fashion students in the UK and India with Indian artisans and their underrepresented brands. My Pearl Academy colleagues and I presented a paper introducing this project at the Future of International Fashion and Design Education hosted by Istituto Marangoni in 2022 which will soon be published as a chapter in a Routledge edited volume.

I am also an artist bookmaker. Her handbound artist's books have been exhibited in the UK, Ireland, Germany, and the United States.

Qualifications

PhD (2017): The Artist's Book: Making as emodied knowlege of creativity and the self (2017), University of Chester (practice-based, pass with no corrections)
MA: Visual Culture (2008), MIRIAD, Manchester Metropolitan University (Distinction)
Postgraduate Certificate of Eduation (2004): Higher, Further & Adult Education
BA (Hons) Graphic Design (2003): Manchester Metropolitan University (First Class Honours)
Recognitions

Fellow of the Royal Society of Art (FRSA)
Higher Education Academy: Senior Fellow (SFHEA)

Previous Employment

2018-2019 Senior Lecturer, Academic Professional Development, University Teaching Academy, MMU

2017-2018 Staffordshire University, Head of Department of Art & Design

2013-2017: Senior Teaching Fellow, Faculty of Arts and Media, University of Chester

2009-2017 University of Chester, Programme Leader of Fashion Marketing and Communication, Senior Lecturer Graphic Design, MA Design, MA Fine Art and Senior University Teaching Fellow.

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Elizabeth Kendon

Professor of Climate Science, University of Bristol
Lizzie is a Met Office Science Fellow and Professor of Climate Science at the University of Bristol Cabot Institute for the Environment. She is a climate scientist working on extreme rainfall processes and their evaluation in models across space and time scales.

Lizzie's work aims to gain a better understanding of extreme rainfall processes, and model deficiencies in the representation of these, across space and time scales. Her work links up Met Office expertise in forecasting extreme events on weather and climate change timescales, and exploits the seamless nature of the Unified Model

A key aspect of her work is developing and running very high resolution (1.5 km) climate simulations for a limited area of the UK. The simulation of extreme rainfall in the 1.5 km model is being analysed and compared with lower resolution model versions. In particular, she is exploring process-links between the large-scale atmospheric circulation and extreme rainfall across model resolution.

Work at the Met Office has shown significant improvements in the representation of extreme rainfall at cloud-permitting scales, with better representation of the diurnal cycle and of internal cloud dynamics (essential for capturing the development and persistence of convective events such as Boscastle in 2004). This suggests the importance of using very high resolution models in climate change studies, in particular for the estimation of changes in convective summer storms and thus flash floods.

New understanding from this work will be applied in the context of developing and improving our climate models, as well as providing guidance to the government on the reliability of future projections of extreme precipitation change.

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Elizabeth Kryder-Reid

Chancellor's Professor of Anthropology and Museum Studies, Indiana University
Dr. Elizabeth Kryder-Reid is Chancellor’s Professor of Anthropology and Museum Studies at Indiana University, Indianapolis, Director of the Cultural Heritage Research Center and Director of the IUPUI Museum Studies Program. Her multidisciplinary research explores the intersections of landscape, power, and memory and investigates how materiality is deployed in the contestation of social inequalities across gender, race, class, ethnicity, and religion. She has disseminated this research peer-reviewed publications, exhibits, and digital history. Her research has focused on landscape history and the production of public memory in the Chesapeake, the Midwest, and the California missions (California Mission Landscapes: Race, Memory, and the Politics of Heritage, U. Minn. Press 2016). Her current research investigates toxic heritage and the ways in which places of environmental harm are mobilized and marginalized in formal and informal memory practices. As part of this research, she has investigated post-industrial sites in the US and UK and was a Fulbright Scholar in France in 2022 studying the toxic heritage of WWI. She is the co-editor with Sarah May of Toxic Heritage: Legacies, Futures, and Environmental Justice (Available open access from Routledge, July 2023).

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Elizabeth Linos

Associate Professor of Public Policy and Management, Harvard Kennedy School
Elizabeth Linos is the Emma Bloomberg Associate Professor for Public Policy and Management, and Faculty Director of The People Lab at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government. The majority of her research focuses on how to improve government by focusing on its people and the services they deliver. Specifically, she uses insights from behavioral science and evidence from public management to consider how to recruit, retain, and support the government workforce, how to reduce administrative burdens that low-income households face when they interact with their government, and how to better integrate evidence-based policymaking into government.

Her research has been published in various academic journals including The Journal for Public Administration Research and Theory, Public Administration Review, Econometrica, American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, Behavioural Public Policy, and others. Her work has also been highlighted in media outlets including The New York Times, The Economist, BBC, NPR, Slate, and the Harvard Business Review. As the former VP and Head of Research and Evaluation at the Behavioral Insights Team in North America, she worked with government agencies in the U.S. and the U.K. to improve programs using behavioral science and to build capacity around rigorous evaluation. Prior to this role, Linos worked directly in government as a policy advisor to the Greek Prime Minister, George Papandreou, focusing on social innovation and public sector reform.

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Elizabeth Mack

Professor of Geography, Michigan State University
Elizabeth Mack is a Professor in the Department of Geography, the Environment, and Spatial Sciences at Michigan State University where she teaches courses in economic geography. Dr. Mack’s research utilizes mixed methods to understand the evolution of the economy in the face of rapid technological change and climate change. Research on technological change evaluates the impact of information and communications technologies (ICTs) on the development trajectory of regional economies and everyday work. Her work on the environment and climate change evaluates household responses to changing environmental contexts, as well as uses and the ability to pay for water services. Dr. Mack’s research has been funded by a variety of agencies including the National Science Foundation (NSF), the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Kauffman Foundation for entrepreneurship research.

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Elizabeth Macpherson

Associate Professor of Law, University of Canterbury
Dr Elizabeth Macpherson is Pākehā (a New Zealander of European-settler descent) and is an Associate Professor at Te Kaupeka Ture (Faculty of Law) at the University of Canterbury. Her research interests are in comparative environmental and natural resources law, human rights and Indigenous rights in Australasia and Latin America. She is the author of the award-winning book Indigenous Water Rights in Law and Regulation: Lessons from Comparative Experience (2019, Cambridge University Press).

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Elizabeth Martin-Silverstone

Research Assistant in Palaeontology, University of Bristol
Liz is currently a research assistant at the University of Bristol, and recently completed her PhD on pterosaur palaeobiology at the University of Southampton. She started out at the University of Alberta, Canada, with a Palaeontology Honours BSc degree, and then moved to the University of Bristol to complete a Master's in Palaeobiology.

She works primarily on pterosaurs and is interested in using modern imaging techniques such as computed tomography to study their bones and better understand the internal structure. For her PhD, Liz looked to use these data to reconstruct pterosaur skeletons and better understand the distribution of mass in the body since there are no modern analogues or descendants of this group. She's also interested in general biomechanics and evolution of flight in vertebrates. Currently, she is working on understanding the function and skeletal formation in osteoarthritis in zebrafish.

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Elizabeth Murray

Senior Lecturer, Education, School of Education, Charles Sturt University
Dr Elizabeth Murray is Senior Lecturer an Academic Program Lead in the School of Education. She is Lead Researcher for Positive Living Skills Australia, Co-Lead of Charles Sturt University's Wellbeing and Mental Health Research Group, and Co-Lead of Charles Sturt University's Early Childhood Interdisciplinary Research Group. Dr Murray is also Academic Program Lead for two large projects: The Grow Your Own Teacher Training program, and the Collaborative Teacher's Aide Pathway program.

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Elizabeth Renner

Lecturer of Psychology, Northumbria University, Newcastle
I completed my PhD at the George Washington University on the topic of social learning (how children, adults, and great apes learn on their own and from others). I am now a lecturer in the Psychology Department at Northumbria University. I am interested in how individuals of different species learn and behave.

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Elizabeth Rieger

Associate Director Education (Psychology), School of Medicine & Psychology, Australian National University
I have now been a practicing Clinical Psychologist for 25 years, having undertaken my clinical training at the University of Sydney.

My main clinical experience has included treating adults with eating disorders, medical patients with accompanying psychological problems, and children and adults with obesity, working in public and private hospitals, university clinics, and private practice. I have also been involved in teaching clinical skills to diverse populations including clinical psychologists and intern clinical psychologists, general practitioners, nurses, and medical students.

In 2001, I completed my PhD, the focus of which was on developing an instrument to assess motivation to change in anorexia nervosa (the Anorexia Nervosa Stages of Change Questionnaire). From 2001-2, I completed a post-doctoral fellowship at the Centre for Eating and Weight Disorders (University of California, San Diego and San Diego State University) where I was trained in interpersonal psychotherapy and undertook an NIH-funded randomised controlled trial for children and adults with obesity. I commenced my academic role as a Lecturer in the School of Psychology at the University of Sydney in 2003 and Senior Lecturer in 2008 before commencing as a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Psychology at the Australian National University in 2009 and Associate Professor in 2012.

I continue to specialise in eating disorders and obesity in my research and clinical work. I am a member of the Eating Disorders Research Society, the Australia and New Zealand Academy for Eating Disorders, the College of Clinical Psychologists of the Australian Psychological Society, and the Australian Clinical Psychology Association.

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Elizabeth Stanway

Reader in Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Warwick
I am a Reader in the Astronomy and Astrophysics group at the University of Warwick with a specific interest in the study of stellar populations and their role in observational cosmology, both at optical and radio wavelengths. The question of how the universe evolved, from the birth of the first stars to the highly structured and massive galaxies we see around us today, is one of the most fundamental that astrophysicists seek to address. It underpins our understanding of nearby galaxies, and is a key driver for the development of the next generation of telescopes. By modelling the stars that combine to produce the light we see from unresolved galaxies I work to improve our understanding of distant systems.

I also publish on the role of science fiction in popular understanding of science, and on the history of astronomy. I post articles on the mutual influence between science and science fiction twice monthly on my Cosmic Stories blog, which can be found at www.warwick.ac.uk/cosmicstories.

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Elizabeth Stratton

Postdoctoral Research Fellow, University of Sydney
Dr Elizabeth Stratton is a postdoctoral researcher with The University of Sydney. Her body of work has focused on the stigma, discrimination and disability of mental health in the workplace and, importantly, developing and evaluating ways to tackle this.
Elizabeth developed a world first web-based decision aid tool to assist employees in deciding if and how they should disclose their mental health problem or not. The rationale behind this research was the complexity of disclosure decision-making, and the identification of several barriers to disclosure. The program, called “READY?” was evaluated in a randomised controlled trial (RCT) trial where it was shown to be more effective in terms of disclosure and improving people’s mental health than the online disclosure and discrimination information provided by Australia’s leading mental health charity. Those using READY? experienced an improvement in depressive symptoms and reported greater decision confidence. ONLY participants who used READY? subsequently disclosed their condition, and the 25% who did disclose experienced even greater mental health benefits.
As an end-user focussed researcher, she has partnered with the NSW government’s Mentally Healthy Workplace program to bring READY? to scale and make it freely available to 100,000’s of workers. The early phases of her ECR carer are focussed on evaluating the uptake and real-world impact of this in mental health and wellbeing.
Additionally, she has developed strong evidence synthesis skills leading to several published systematic reviews of mental health and wellbeing interventions.

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Elizabeth Swanner

Associate Professor of Geology, Iowa State University
I am a biogeochemist with expertise in anoxic aquatic systems. I study microbial processes that transform inorganic chemical species, particularly metals such as iron. I am interested in the rise of oxygen on Earth, and photosynthetic organisms that drove environmental evolution.

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Elizabeth Webster

Professor Beth Webster is the Director of the Centre for Transformative Innovation at Swinburne University of Technology. Her area of study is the economics of how knowledge is created and diffuses through the economy. On these topics alone she has authored over 100 articles in outlets such as RAND Journal of Economics, Review of Economics and Statistics, Oxford Economic Papers, Journal of Law & Economics and Cambridge Journal of Economics. She has been appointed to a number of committees including the Lomax-Smith Base funding Review; CEDA Advisory Council; the Bracks Automotive review; the Advisory Council for Intellectual Property; the European Policy for Intellectual Property Association; the Economic Society of Victoria and the Asia Pacific Innovation Conference. She is also holds honorary research positions at the Universities of Melbourne, Oxford and Tasmania.

She has a PhD (economics) from the University of Cambridge and economics degrees from Monash University.

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Elizabeth Wells

PhD Candidate, University of South Australia
Elizabeth Wells is a PhD candidate with the University of South Australia. She left working in libraries in central Victoria to come to South Australia and undertake research around restoring the therapeutic benefits of reading to people undergoing cancer treatment. She holds a BSc in Computer Science and History & Philosophy of Science from The University of Melbourne, a Graduate Diploma of Education (Secondary) from LaTrobe University, a Graduate Diploma and Master of Library and Information Management from the University of South Australia. Her main area of interest is reading for wellbeing, particularly for people affected by cancer and people in palliative care. She is also passionate about the role of libraries in our communities and pre-literacy and literacy programs. Elizabeth can be reached at [email protected]

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Elizabeth Williams1

Senior Lecturer, School of Cybernetics, Australian National University
Elizabeth Williams completed her PhD in experimental nuclear structure at Yale University in 2009. She completed post-doctoral work at Yale and CSIRO in Sydney, worked in nuclear reaction dynamics at the ANU, and began working with the ANU's 3A Institute (now within the School of Cybernetics) in 2018. Her current work aims to contribute to the creation of a new branch of engineering to help scale technology safely, responsibly and sustainably.

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Elizabeth (Liz) Jackson

Associate Professor of Supply Chain Management & Logistics, Curtin University
Elizabeth (Liz) Jackson has national and international experience in industrial and academic agri-food supply chain systems. Her doctoral research focus was on wool commerce and she has since been engaged with research into farming systems and agri-food supply chains in the UK, Taiwan, Libya and Nigeria. Liz is a member-elected non-executive director of Sheep Producers Australia and is a member of WAFarmers' Livestock Council.

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Elizabeth A. MacDonald

Space Physicist, NASA
My research has focused on experimental particle measurement techniques and data analysis in the magnetosphere and ionosphere for the last 15 years. Currently I am a Co-I on the Helium, Oxygen, Proton, and Electron Spectrometer on the NASA Radiation Belts Storm Probe mission. At Los Alamos National Laboratory, I was the PI for the Z-Plasma Spectrometer on the DOE Space and Atmospheric Burst Reporting System (SABRS) geosynchronous payload. I also led the Innovative Research and Integrated Sensing (IRIS) team in my group (www.lanl.gov/projects/iris). In the recent past I've led the DoE-funded Technology Infusion Project entitled Modular Advanced Space Environment Instrumentation (from 2009-2011) and served as the PI for the Advanced Miniaturized Plasma Spectrometer on the DOE SABRS Validation Experiment payload (2007-2008).

I have a blend of expertise in both instrument development and data analysis and interpretation that comes from sounding rocket and satellite instrumentation experience. This experience ranges over the complete cycle of instrument production, including design and modeling, integration and testing, calibration, satellite operations, and in situ scientific data analysis. As a result, I'm very interested in instrument technology development, basic magnetospheric science, and space situational awareness national priorities. My specific research interests include wave-particle interactions and the effect of plasma on radiation belt dynamics, mapping, coupling, and transport between the ionosphere and the inner magnetosphere, and the impact of heavy ions on geomagnetic storm processes.

I received my Masters and PhD degrees from the University of New Hampshire. I received a Bachelor's in Physics from the University of Washington, largely funded by a NASA Space Grant scholarship. I began work in Code 673 in February 2014.

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Elizabeth Kay-Raining Bird

Professor Emeritus, School of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Dalhousie University
Elizabeth Kay-Raining Bird, better known as 'Mandy', is a professor emeritus in the School of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Dalhousie University. Throughout her career, her clinical, teaching and research focus has been on the development, speech and language assessment and treatment of children with disabilities, particularly those from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. Mandy also advocates at provincial, regional and national levels to institute a Canada-wide basic income guarantee--a powerful tool for poverty elimination and individual and societal health promotion.

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Elizabeth Mary Clancy

Lecturer, School of Psychology, Deakin University
I am an experienced researcher, teacher and evaluator, and a registered Psychologist, with a PhD in Psychology. My thesis addressed the issue of harmful online behaviours in emerging adulthood, specifically sext dissemination and the motivations for this and related behaviours. I also hold a Masters in Industrial and Orgnaisational Psychology, an MBA and Masters of Management, and Bachelor of Engineering.

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