Menu

Search

Sarah Whitcombe-Dobbs

Senior Lecturer in Child and Family Psychology, University of Canterbury
Sarah is a Child and Family Psychologist and Senior Lecturer in the Faculty of Health at the University of Canterbury. She has worked as a psychologist and in other roles with children and families for over 20 years. Her area of research interest is assessment and intervention with families who have ongoing involvement with child protection services, and she specialises in the assessment of complex developmental and trauma-related difficulties.

  More

Less

Sarah Wilson

PhD Candidate in Nanotechnology & Innovation Governance, University of Technology Sydney
Sarah is a PhD Candidate at the Institute for Sustainable Futures (ISF). Her research examines the governance of technological innovation, with a focus on the commercial governance of toxic engineered nano-materials (ENMs). Through this, Sarah works across frontier science (including nanotechnology and quantum technologies) to explore the responsible development, application, and governance of rapidly evolving and complex technoscientific innovations. She approaches these uncertain phenomena through the lens of social governance frameworks. Sarah has previously worked in the space of industrial chemicals governance, collaborating with government and industry to better understand and manage the use of hazardous chemicals in commercial supply chains.

  More

Less

Sarah Woodruff

Professor, Director of the Community Health, Enviornment, and Wellness Lab, University of Windsor
I am a multidisciplinary researcher who strives to advance the health and wellness among Canadian children and adolescents. More specifically, I am a community-based researcher who investigates the environmental influences (e.g., family, peers, school, media) on nutrition, physical activity, body image, and other health outcomes. Much of my research is done in partnership with various public health units, the Bulimia and Anorexia Nervosa Association (BANA), Leadership Advancement for Women and Sport (LAWS), and the Ontario Student Nutrition Program.

  More

Less

Sarah A. Spitzer

Research Fellow in Climate and Space Sciences and Engineering, University of Michigan
I received a Ph.D. in space science and engineering from the University of Michigan with a focus on Heliophysics in situ observations, especially related to heliospheric and interstellar interactions. I analyzed pickup ion data from ACE/SWICS to track the evolution of the interstellar wind through the heliosphere over a complete solar cycle and worked on the characterization for the geometric factor under laboratory conditions of the Heavy Ion Sensor onboard Solar Orbiter (SO-HIS). During my postdoctoral research, I have been continuing my research on pickup ion measurements and extending the SO-HIS instrument characterization to include a spaceflight voltage analysis as well as a characterization of the detector efficiencies and elevation acceptance ranges.

I additionally hold master's degrees in space science and engineering as well as electrical and computer engineering with a focus in robotics and embedded systems and graduate certificates in plasma science and engineering and graduate teaching. I have a bachelor's degree in computer engineering with minors in multidisciplinary design in engineering and in Near Eastern studies.

  More

Less

Sarah E. Patterson

Research Investigator at the Survey Research Center at the Institute of Social Research, University of Michigan
Dr. Patterson’s research addresses whether and how social norms and family composition influence caregiving behaviors for family members. She studies the role of shifting family composition among older adults, such as increasing complexity and kinlessness. She also has a line of work on attitudes about caregiving for older adults. Dr. Patterson is currently completing both demographic and focus group studies regarding family and other unpaid care for older adults with dementia with National Institute on Aging funding. She’s also experienced in knowledge translation and dissemination activities relating to data and research.

  More

Less

Sarah E. Turner

Associate Professor, Geography, Planning and Environment, Concordia University
Sarah Turner is a primate behavioural ecologist whose research focuses on disability and physical impairment, behavioural plasticity, and the impacts of human-induced environmental change. She conducts research on free-ranging Japanese macaques at the Awajishima Monkey Center in Japan, and collaborative research on bearded and blond capuchin monkey behaviour and conservation in Brazil. She has a PhD in Anthropology (Primatology) from the University of Calgary, and was a post-doctoral fellow in Biology at McGill University before starting her position at Concordia University.

  More

Less

Sarah Elizabeth Dalrymple

Senior Lecturer in Conservation Ecology, Liverpool John Moores University
Sarah Dalrymple is a Senior Lecturer in Conservation Ecology at Liverpool John Moores University, UK. She is a plant ecologist focusing on threatened species and responses to global threats such as climate change, and on the efficacy of conservation interventions.

Sarah has undertaken various practical conservation initiatives including reintroduction and habitat restoration, has reviewed threatened plant translocations, and contributed to policy documents, including co-authoring the IUCN Reintroductions Guidelines (2013) and the Scottish Code for Conservation Translocations (2014). Sarah is currently working across the conservation and forestry sectors to find common approaches to minimise biodiversity loss including opportunities to use translocations as bioassays of environmental change, and explore the use of assisted colonization to avoid species extinctions due to climate change.

Sarah is Programme Leader for BSc Wildlife Conservation at LJMU, and also an Associate Editor for the journals Ecological Solutions and Evidence and British and Irish Botany.

  More

Less

Sarah G. Phillips

Professor of Global Conflict and Development at The University of Sydney; Non-Resident Fellow at the Sana'a Center for Strategic Studies, University of Sydney
Sarah G. Phillips is Professor of Global Conflict and Development at the University of Sydney, a Future Fellow with the Australian Research Council, and a Non-Resident Fellow at the Sana'a Centre for Strategic Studies (Yemen). Her research draws from years of in-depth fieldwork (particularly in Yemen, Somaliland, Iraq, Kenya, and Jordan), and focuses on international intervention in the global South, knowledge production about conflict-affected states, authoritarianism, and critical terrorism studies.

She lived in Yemen for nearly four years, and has published two books and many articles on its politics, the latest of which is "Trivializing Terrorists: How Counterterrorism Knowledge Undermines Local Resistance to Terrorism” (with Nadwa al-Dawsari), Security Studies (Open Access, 2023): https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09636412.2023.2250253?src=

Sarah's most recent book, "When There Was No Aid: War and Peace in Somaliland", was awarded the Australian Political Science Association’s biennial Crisp Prize for the best scholarly political science book (2018-20). It was also listed as a ‘Best Book of 2020’ by Foreign Affairs, and a ‘Book of the Year' (2020) by Australian Book Review, and was shortlisted for both the Conflict Research Society’s 'Book of the Year Prize' (2021), and the African Studies Association’s 'Bethwell A. Ogot Book Prize' (2021).

  More

Less

Sarah M. Hughes

Assistant Professor in Human Geography, Northumbria University, Newcastle
I am a Political Geographer interested in forced migration, resistance, citizenship and creative practice. I have a longstanding interest in how systems of asylum governance across Europe are lived, experienced and resisted. This has included research on the role of creativity within immigration detention centres, resistance to dispersal accommodation, and the everyday lives of those who have recently have been granted refugee status.

My work has been widely published in academic books and journals, including an edited collection on Critical Geographies of Resistance. I've also worked closely with support organisations to improve refugee voice within organisation structures, fed my research into debates in Parliament, and worked with local authorities on integrating systems to try and improve support for new refugees.

  More

Less

Sarah Marie Wiebe

Assistant Professor, School of Public Administration, University of Victoria
Dr. Sarah Marie Wiebe grew up on Coast Salish territory in British Columbia, BC. She is an Assistant Professor in the School of Public Administration at the University of Victoria and an Adjunct Professor at the University of Hawai'i, Mānoa with a focus on community development and environmental sustainability. She is a Co-Founder of the FERN (Feminist Environmental Research Network) Collaborative and has published in journals including New Political Science, Citizenship Studies and Studies in Social Justice. She is the author of Life against States of Emergency: Revitalizing Treaty Relations from Attawapiskat with UBC Press, 2023. Her book Everyday Exposure: Indigenous Mobilization and Environmental Justice in Canada's Chemical Valley (2016) with UBC Press won the Charles Taylor Book Award (2017) and examines policy responses to the impact of pollution on the Aamjiwnaang First Nation's environmental health. Alongside Dr. Jennifer Lawrence (Virginia Tech), she is the Co-Editor of Biopolitical Disaster and along with Dr. Leah Levac (Guelph), the Co-Editor of Creating Spaces of Engagement: Policy Justice and the Practical Craft of Deliberative Democracy. At the intersections of environmental justice and citizen engagement, her teaching and research interests emphasize political ecology, policy justice and deliberative dialogue. As a collaborative researcher and filmmaker, she worked with Indigenous communities on sustainability-themed films including To Fish as Formerly. She is currently collaborating with artists from Attawapiskat on a project entitled Reimagining Attawapiskat funded through a SSHRC Insight Development Grant. Sarah is also a Co-Director for the Seascape Indigenous Storytelling Studio, funded through a SSHRC Insight Grant with research partners from the University of Victoria, University of British Columbia and coastal Indigenous communities.

  More

Less

Sarah Vivienne Bentley

Research Scientist, Responsible Innovation, Data61, CSIRO

  More

Less

Sarah-Jane Page

Associate Professor, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Nottingham
Sarah-Jane is a sociologist of religion, specialising in gender and sexuality. After working at Aston University for over a decade, she joined the University of Nottingham as an Associate Lecturer in 2023. She is currently working on projects related to abortion attitudes and anti-abortion activism, abuse in religious contexts pertaining to the Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse, and school protests in relation to sex education teaching. Previously, she completed a PhD on clergy motherhood and Anglican clergy husbands at the University of Nottingham and undertook various postdoctoral positions at Durham University and the University of Nottingham respectively. Between 2009-2011, She worked on the large grant, Religion, Youth and Sexuality: A Multi-faith Exploration, with Professor Andrew Yip and Dr Michael Keenan. Utilising a mixed methods approach, this research focused on 18- to 25-year-olds from a variety of religious backgrounds in order to understand attitudes and practices around sexuality.

  More

Less

Sarah-Jane (SJ) Research Fellow, Sch

Sarah-Jane's research is focused on twentieth-century American poetry with a particular interest in the literary history of New England and the study and preservation of archival materials related to this period.

She is the Official Historian for the New England Poetry Club in Boston, MA and her research has been funded internationally by several universities. In 2019 she was a Research Fellow at the Houghton Library, Harvard. She has also been the recipient of an Everett Helm Visiting Fellowship at the Lilly Library, Indiana University and a Dissertation Grant from the Schlesinger Library for the History of Women in America, Harvard.
She has worked in both academic and professional roles in the tertiary sector including the English department at Macquarie University, Sydney and the Library division of Western Sydney University.

  More

Less

Sarah-Sophie Weil

PhD candidate, Swansea University
I am interested in large-scale biogeographic patterns and the underlying mechanisms and processes. Species' dispersal (natural dispersal, invasions and range shifts) is a particular favourite of mine, especially in the context of land-use and climate changes. It is one of the proccesses at the origin of biodiversity as it can lead to speciation, and it determines where we can find which species today. I completed a joint PhD programme between Swansea University (Wales, UK) and Université Grenoble Alpes (France), and have now moved to Germany for a postdoc position.

  More

Less

Sarala Krishnamurthy

Prof Sarala Krishnamurthy is a professor of literature and applied linguistics in the Department of Communication in the Faculty of Commerce, Human Sciences and Education. She was dean of the faculty for more than 11 years. Now, she teaches at the post graduate level and has supervised more than 20 Masters, 12 MPhils and 9 PhDs in postcolonial literature, feminist literature, English language teaching and stylistics.

She has published widely and presented papers at several international conferences all over the world. She has co-edited two major volumes - Writing Namibia: Literature in Transition and Coming of Age which present the best of critical writing on Namibian literature. She completed two major research projects in 2021. These were the P3ICL project, funded by the European Union, to protect, preserve and promote indigenous culture and languages, and Herero Genocide Survivor Narratives, funded by Basler Afrika, Bibliographien. The latter is path-breaking because it records interviews of genocide survivor families and presents heart-rending tales of trauma and resilience of the Otjiherero people of Namibia.

In 2020, she also published six books which are collections of folk tales and plays in the Oludhimba, !Kung and Sifwe languages of Namibia. Currently, she is working on a new book - Nama Genocide Survivor Narratives - along with colleagues in the department.

  More

Less

Sarita Pillay

Lecturer in the School of Geography, Archaeology and Environmental Studies, University of the Witwatersrand
Dr Sarita Pillay Gonzalez is a lecturer in Human Geography at the School of Geography, Archaeology and Environmental Studies (GAES) at Wits. Sarita was awarded her PhD through the School of Architecture & Planning (SoAP) at Wits in 2022, undertaking fieldwork in Johannesburg and Bangalore. Her research interests in real estate development and the multifarity of the state in the built environment were inspired by her time as a researcher, community organiser and popular educator in affordable housing campaigns in Cape Town from 2016 to 2018. Prior to this, as a Fulbright scholar, Sarita received her Masters in Urban & Regional Planning from the University of Minnesota focused on Spatial Justice & Political Economy.

  More

Less

Sarvin Hassani

Senior Lecturer in International Business, Anglia Ruskin University
As senior lecturer in international business, I am interested in macroeconomics, economic innovation, economic growth and economic productivity.
I am also leading Centre for Student Success (CfSS) which focuses on student engagement and implement various intervention across the academic year to support students and increase the student's success rate. I am also active researcher in this area.

  More

Less

Sascha Samlal

PhD Candidate, The University of Melbourne
Sascha Tanuja Samlal is a PhD candidate at The University of Melbourne in Cultural Studies. Her research project titled, Shame and the Figure of the Fangirl: Reconfiguring Shame in Popular Music Fandom, commenced in 2023. Her research spans fandom studies, social media studies, critical femininity studies, and feminist and queer theory. She is an advocate for attending to questions of femininity and queer lived experiences in research.

  More

Less

Sasha Moodie

Research Officer, Curtin University
I graduated from the Master of Public Health at the University of Melbourne in 2023. During my studies, I developed an interest in qualitative research methods and community-based approaches to public health responses and research. Since graduating, I have been working at the Melbourne School of Population and Global Health and the National Drug Research Institute at Curtin University in Indigenous health research. I also have experience working in sexual and reproductive healthcare and Victorian Government public health programs.

  More

Less

Sasha Volodarsky

Ph.D. Student in Political Science, Northeastern University
Sasha Volodarsky is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Political Science at Northeastern University, specializing in Comparative Politics and American Politics. He has a strong background and interest in voters’ and parties’ behavior and particularly in voters’ volatility. During Sasha’s MA studies he served as a Teaching Assistant at Sapir Academic College (Israel) and as a Research Assistant at Interdisciplinary Center Herzliya (Israel).

Sasha’s research interests lie at the intersection of comparative politics (arising from fascination with multi-party democracies) and American politics (which puts more emphasis on voters’ and parties’ behavior). In his studies, Sasha hope to continue research of switching behavior in multi-party democracies and the rise of populism.

Sasha grew up in Donetsk, Ukraine and moved to Israel at the age of 17. After completing his BA in Sociology, he served as a research officer at the Command and Staff College of the Israel Defense Forces, heading the research department.

After his army service Sasha started to work as a marketing researcher. After several years he became interested in socially oriented research. Therefore, Sasha switched to the field of applied research and worked at Myers-JDC-Brookdale Institute in Jerusalem, and later at the Cohen Center for Modern Jewish Studies at Brandeis University. In addition, he spent several years overseeing group counselor training in informal education projects. Sasha is fluent in Russian, Ukrainian, and Hebrew.

  More

Less

Sasha Wilmoth

Lecturer in Linguistics and Applied Linguistics, The University of Melbourne
Sasha Wilmoth is a Lecturer in Linguistics and Applied Linguistics at the University of Melbourne, working within the Research Unit for Indigenous Language. Her research focusses on the languages of Indigenous Australia. In particular, she works with Pitjantjatjara communities to document the structure of their language, how the language is being maintained and adapted by young people, and how to keep the language strong through bilingual education.

  More

Less

Sasimonthakan Tanarsuwongkul

Ph.D. Candidate in Biochemistry, University of South Carolina
I am currently working on finding the biomarker(s) of a vascular disease using proteomics and finding the receptor(s) of a group of plant defense signals using chemoproteomics, along with analyzing a modified virus using the liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry.

  More

Less

Saskia Charity

Postdoctoral Research Associate, Particle Physics, University of Liverpool
I am a senior Research Associate in the Particle Physics group at the University of Liverpool. My research is focused on Muon Physics. In particular, I work on resolving the tension between the experimental and theoretical determinations of the muon anomalous magnetic moment. I have been working on the Fermilab muon g-2 experiment since 2014. After gaining my PhD from the University of Liverpool, where I built hardware and developed reconstruction algorithms for the g-2 tracking detectors, I moved to Fermilab as a Research Associate in the muon department. During my time working on g-2 I have been involved with many different aspects of the operations and analysis of the experiment. In my current role as magnetic field Analysis Coordinator, I analyze data from multiple systems to make an ultra-precise measurement of the muon-weighted magnetic field, which is one of the two main quantities required to determine the value of the muon anomalous magnetic moment. In 2022, I joined the University of Liverpool once again, to continue my work on g-2 as well as other muon experiments.

  More

Less

Saskia Kohnen

Director, Australian Literacy Clinic, Australian Catholic University
Professor Saskia Kohnen is the Director of the Australian Literacy Clinic at ACU where she works with an interdisciplinary team of (neuro)psychologists, speech-language pathologists and teachers. The clinic conducts literacy assessments and interventions and provides input into ACU's teacher training programs and professional development. Saskia's current research interests include the assessment of the underlying causes of reading and spelling difficulties in children and adolescents; conducting intervention trials for children and adults with developmental and acquired reading and spelling difficulties; and the investigation of more typical reading and spelling acquisition.

  More

Less

Saskia Roberts

PhD Candidate, School of History, Australian National University
Saskia is a PhD Candidate in History at the Australian National University. She researches Australian teenage girls, intimate knowledge and print culture between 1970 and 2010. She is also a member of the Lilith: A Feminist History Journal editorial collective.

  More

Less

Satish Kumar

Research Fellow, The Senator George J. Mitchell Institute for Global Peace, Security and Justice, Queen's University Belfast
Dr. M. Satish Kumar’s research has been to understand the production of colonial and postcolonial ordering of space. Currently, he is engaged with the challenges faced by cultural heritage due to rapid urban expansion, political conflict and climate change and natural disasters. Of particular interest is the role of cultural heritage in informing questions of marginalization, identity in a decolonialized world. This involves identifying the synergies of the physical and the human ecosystems.

Providing critical non-Eurocentric perspectives to questions of colonial and postcolonial development based on previous research on dignity, gender, values, sustainable human development and humanitarian competition, across the rural-urban divide.

  More

Less

Saul Eslake

In 2016, Saul Eslake was appointed as the University of Tasmania's inaugural Vice-Chancellor’s Fellow. A focus of his efforts in the role will be the University’s Institute for the Study of Social Change, where he will provide advice and leadership on new research programs designed to analyse and address the social and economic challenges facing our local community and nation as a whole. His work also will centre upon the importance of education to Tasmania.

This is a part-time role; Saul is also an independent consulting economist.

Saul Eslake has worked as an economist in the Australian financial markets for 25 years, including 14 years as Chief Economist at the Australia & New Zealand Banking Group (ANZ).

After leaving ANZ in mid-2009, Saul was Director of the Productivity Growth program at the Grattan Institute, a non-aligned public policy 'think tank' affiliated with the University of Melbourne, and a part-time Advisor in PricewaterhouseCoopers' Economics & Policy practice.

From 2011 to 2015, Saul was Chief Economist at the Australian arm of Bank of America Merrill Lynch, before establishing a private consultancy in Tasmania.

Saul is a non-executive director of Hydro Tasmania (the Tasmanian state-owned electricity generator), and Chair of the Board of Ten Days on the Island (Tasmania's biennial multi-arts festival). He has previously been a member of the National Housing Supply Council and the Australian Statistics Advisory Committee; Chair of the Tasmanian Arts Advisory Board; and a non-executive director of the Australian Business Arts Foundation. He was also a member of the Howard Government's Foreign Affairs and Trade Policy Advisory Councils, and of the Rudd Government's Long-Term Tourism Strategy Steering Committee.

  More

Less

Saul Lehrfreund

Visiting Professor, School of Law, University of Reading
Saul Lehrfreund is the co-founder and Co-Executive Director of The Death Penalty Project, an international human rights organisation based at Simons Muirhead & Burton solicitors in London. Saul specialises in constitutional and international human rights law and has represented prisoners under sentence of death before the domestic courts in the Commonwealth and international tribunals since the organization's inception in 1992. He has assisted lawyers in many countries (including Uganda, Nigeria, Malawi, Ghana, India and Malaysia) in constitutional cases concerning the death penalty and has participated in expert delegations to Japan, Taiwan, China and India.

In November 2000, Saul was awarded an MBE for services to international human rights law and in July 2009, he received an Honorary Degree of Doctor of Laws from the University of Reading.

He is a founder member of UK Foreign & Commonwealth Office Pro Bono Panel representing British Nationals facing the death penalty. Saul has published and lectured extensively on capital punishment and human rights to a wide range of audiences including the United Nations and the Council of Europe.

  More

Less

Saverio Eric Spagnolie

Professor of Mathematics, University of Wisconsin-Madison
My interests lie at the interface between fluid and solid structures in soft biological matter. The dynamics of bodies immersed in fluids at small scales is of great practical and biological interest, but fluid interactions on such scales are inherently nonlocal so their analysis and even computation can still be very challenging. I approach problems in biological propulsion, cell mechanics, and fluid-body interaction systems using a number of techniques, from the application of classical methods of applied mathematics to the development of novel numerical methods.

  More

Less

Savitri Taylor

Associate Professor, Law School, La Trobe University
Savitri Taylor's research over the past 30 years has focused on refugee law and asylum policy at the national, regional and international level.

  More

Less

Sayonnha Mandal

Lecturer in Interdisciplinary Informatics, University of Nebraska Omaha
Dr. Sayonnha Mandal is a Lecturer of Cybersecurity in the College of Information Science and Technology at the University of Nebraska at Omaha (UNO). She received a Masters in Telecommunication Engineering from the University of Oklahoma and a Masters in Cybersecurity from UNO. Dr. Mandal earned her doctorate in Information Security from UNO, with a focus on software security requirements modeling and analysis. Her research interests include cybersecurity curriculum development, information security policy and governance and quantum cryptographic implementations. Moreover, she has experience in teaching a variety of cybersecurity courses at both the graduate and undergraduate levels including Digital forensics, Foundations of Cybersecurity, Intro to Cybersecurity, Cryptography, Security Policy and Awareness and Computer and Network Security.

  More

Less

Scarlett Baron

Associate Professor in Department of English, UCL
Scarlett Baron took her B.A. (2003), M.St. (2005), and D.Phil. (2008) at Christ Church, Oxford.

She was affiliated to the École Normale Supérieure and the Institut des Textes et Manuscrits Modernes in Paris in 2006, and spent two months as a Scholar of the Zurich James Joyce Foundation in 2007.

She was a Research Fellow at Magdalen College, Oxford, from 2008 to 2011.

She joined UCL as a Teaching Fellow in 2011, assuming the role of Lecturer in 2012 and Associate Professor in 2018.

She is a member of the Advisory Board of the James Joyce Quarterly and a Trustee of the International James Joyce Foundation.

  More

Less

Scarlett Howard

Lecturer, Monash University
Dr Scarlett Howard is a lecturer and research group leader in the School of Biological Sciences at Monash University. Her research spans cognition, behaviour, pollination, ecology, zoology, neurobiology, environmental change, and bio-inspired solutions. She predominantly works with bees and other insects to explore the cognitive abilities of miniature insect brains. Her work on honeybee cognition and pollination spans between collaborations across the world.

Scarlett has previously worked at the Centre for Integrative Ecology (CIE), School of Life and Environmental Sciences at Deakin University, the Bio-Inspired Digital Sensing (BIDS) Lab, School of Media and Communication at RMIT University, the School of BioSciences at the University of Melbourne, the Experience-Dependent Plasticity in Insects (EXPLAIN) Team in the Research Center on Animal Cognition (CRCA) with CNRS - Université Toulouse III - Paul Sabatier (Toulouse, France).

  More

Less

Scott Bridges

Scott is a PhD candidate at the University of Canberra where he also teaches communications and journalism.

  More

Less

Scott Cairney

Associate Professor of Psychology, University of York
I lead the Emotion Processing and Offline Consolidation (EPOC) Lab at the University of York. Our research addresses the mechanisms through which sleep disturbances give rise to mental health problems, with a focus on neurobiological perspectives. We use a range of methods to do this, including behavioural studies, sleep electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Our findings have helped us to better understand what goes wrong in the brains of people who are not sleeping well, and how we can target these impairments to improve the prospects of people at risk of psychiatric disorders.

  More

Less

  261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270   
  • Market Data
Close

Welcome to EconoTimes

Sign up for daily updates for the most important
stories unfolding in the global economy.