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Mark McLay

Mark joined GCU having just completed his PhD at the University of Edinburgh in 2015. His thesis examined the Republican party's challenge to the War on Poverty between 1964 and 1968 and he is currently working to expand it into book which will take the project into 1973 when the Nixon Administration closed the Office of Economic Opportunity (and thus effectively ended the War on Poverty).

He has taught primarily American History for over five years at a variety of institutions. He currently teaches an Honours course on the 1920s and 1930s in the US.

Mark is primarily interested in the political history of the twentieth century in the United States and the United Kingdom. In particular, he enjoys researching the influence of prominent politicians on their respective country's history. Are they able to instigate successful social change? Are they able to shape public opinion, or are they forever shaped by it? He is also especially interested in the intersection between politics and socio-economic policy in the US during the twentieth century.

Mark co-hosts and produces the American History Too! podcast with Dr. Malcolm Craig. Episodes on issues ranging from the 1920s Scopes Monkey Trial to the HIV/AIDS Crisis in the 1980s can be found on iTunes or http://americanhistorytoo.podbean.com/.

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Mark Moritz

My research focuses on the transformation of African pastoral systems. I examine how pastoralists adapt to changing ecological, political and institutional conditions that affect their lives and livelihoods. I have been conducting research with pastoralists in the Far North Region of Cameroon since 1993. The long-term research has resulted in strong collaborations with local researchers, which has allowed me to develop innovative, interdisciplinary research projects with colleagues at the Ohio State University and the University of Maroua in Cameroon. Check out my website for more information about my research and teaching activities: http://mlab.osu.edu

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Mark New

Director, African Climate and Development Initiative, University of Cape Town
Mark New was appointed Pro-VC for Climate Change and Director of the ACDI in July 2011. He is also Professor of International Development (part time) at the University of East Anglia. His research focuses on climate change detection, processes, scenarios, impacts and adaptation. He sits on the SA Global Change Science Committee, is on the editorial board of Environmental Research Letters, and various other science committees and reference groups.

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Mark Payton

Mark Payton, Ph.D., is a Professor and Head of the Department of Statistics at Oklahoma State University. He has been on the faculty at OSU for 25 years. His research spans many disciplines, including political modelling, biomedical sciences, and biology.

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Mark Robert Anderson

Professor in Computing and Information Systems, Edge Hill University

After gaining a PhD from the University of Liverpool, Mark worked for a number of large commercial organisations in software development. This work as allowed to gain a broad range of experiences in all aspects of the software lifecycle in industries which have represented the automotive, retail and financial sectors as well as working in consultancy for a number of years.

Since moving into Higher Education, Mark has been employed as a Professor in Computing and Information Systems, and has led courses at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels in subjects such as Grid Computing, Distributed Systems and Java Programming. He has also introduced new subjects into the Computing curriculum in collaboration with colleagues, such as Physical Computing to engage the students with programming activities. Mark has also successfully supervised a number of students through the dissertation/project process and is currently the Programme Leader for BSc(Hons) Computing (Application Development) course and Programme Leader for the MSc Advanced Software Application course.

He has also worked with a number of external clients to develop novel solutions for interacting with customers. In this capacity, solutions have been developed using Microsoft Kinect cameras, Leap Motion, mobile devices and embedded systems.

Mark is currently the Director of the Centre for Data Analysis and Representation on behalf of the department. The group consists of an expanding team and is currently undertaking a number of research projects with national and international partners. Examples of the research projects which the group are investigating includes the Software Validation Project which is researching quality assurance of one of the most significant software models in the world. Mark is also leading the group’s involvement on the international HistorySpace project, and is working with national organisations in developing further projects. Mark is the lead academic on two KTP projects which are aimed at utilising data analytics and visualisation to enhance business processes for local SMEs.

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Mark Skilton

Mark's research interests are in technology ecosystems around defining value and monetization; multi-channel operating model strategies; data standards, governance and compliance, and visualization strategies.

He has led large multi-division and multi-country transformation programs in a variety of public and private companies across their supply chains including retail, automotive, aerospace, pharmaceuticals, food & drink, electronics, utilities, transport, financial services and defense. Mark's experience includes new media multi-channel services, big data analytics and mobile ecosystems for new business models having worked directly in digital TV and media organizations and telecommuncations companies for marketing and new business services development.

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Mark Stuart

Assistant Professor, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Nottingham

Mark Stuart is an Assistant Professor in the School of Politics and International Relations. For the last twenty years, his main research area (along with Professor Philip Cowley) has been in the realm of parliamentary voting behaviour. He has also published widely in the field of British political biography, having penned portraits of Douglas Hurd (1998) and John Smith (2005). His latest biography - on Eric Forth - is due to be published in the late autumn of 2017.

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Mark Taylor

Mark Taylor is Dean of Warwick Business School, where he is also Professor of Finance. As well as previously holding a number of senior academic appointments, he has extensive experience of the finance industry as a foreign exchange trader and as a financial markets economist at both the Bank of England and the International Monetary Fund. Prior to taking up the Deanship at Warwick in 2010, he worked as a Managing Director at BlackRock, the world’s largest asset manager, where he led the European arm of a multi-billion dollar hedge fund.

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Mark van Rijmenam

Mark van Rijmenam is Founder of Datafloq. Datafloq is the One-Stop Source for Big Data, creating the Big Data ecosystem by connecting all stakeholders within the global Big Data market. He is an entrepreneur, a highly sought-after international public speaker and a Big Data strategist.

He is author of the best-selling book Think Bigger - Developing a Successful Big Data Strategy for Your Business. He is co-founder of ‘Data Donderdag’ a bi-monthly (networking) event in The Netherlands on Big Data to help organizations better understand Big Data. He is named a global top 10 Big Data influencer.

In 2016 he started with his PhD doing research on the role and influence of Big Data / Internet of Everything on strategic innovation at UTS.

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Mark Webber

Professor of International Politics, University of Birmingham

Mark Webber is an International Relations specialist. Having begun his academic career specialising in Russian foreign policy, he has spent the last fifteen years teaching and researching foreign policy analysis, security studies and international organisation. The specific focus of his current research is the politics of NATO and European security cooperation. Professor Webber worked for nearly twenty years at Loughborough University before moving to Birmingham in January 2011 as the Head of the School of Government and Society.

Research and academic interests:

The politics, history and theoretical interpretation of NATO
Foreign policy analysis
Security governance
EU external relationsy
Comparative international organization
Russian foreign policy and the international politics of the former Soviet Union

Current and recent projects:

NATO after Afghanistan (ESRC Seminar Series, concluded October 2015).
Theorizing NATO
Europe after Enlargement
NATO: Survival or Regeneration? British Academy (completed 2007)
Inclusion, Exclusion and the Governance of European Security, Leverhulme Research Fellowship (completed 2004)
Security Governance in the New Europe, joint holder, Economic and Social Research Council, ‘New Security Challenges’ programme (completed 2002)

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Mark Widdowson

Mark is a Teaching and Supervising Transactional analyst, and a UKCP and European Association for Psychotherapy registered psychotherapist.

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Marshall Eakin

Professor of History, Vanderbilt University

Marshall Eakin is a historian of Latin America specializing in the history of Brazil. Although his work spans all of Brazilian history, his major publications have concentrated on the processes of nationalism and nation-building, economic and business history, and industrialization—primarily in the twentieth century.

His first book, British Enterprise in Brazil: The St. John d’el Rey Mining Company and the Morro Velho Gold Mine, 1830-1960 (Duke, 1989), traces the history of the most successful foreign enterprise in 19th- and 20th-century Brazil. Tropical Capitalism: The Industrialization of Belo Horizonte, Brazil (Palgrave, 2001) examines the industrialization of the second-largest industrial center in Brazil.

Much of his work addresses audiences beyond the academy. This work includes Brazil: The Once and Future Country (St. Martin’s, 1997), a one-volume introduction to Brazil for beginners and two video courses with the Great Courses, The Conquest of the Americas and The Americas in a Revolutionary Era. His more recent book is The History of Latin America: Collision of Cultures (Palgrave Macmillan, 2007). Eakin’s latest book project is “Becoming Brazilians: Race and National Identity in Twentieth-Century Brazil” to be published by Cambridge University Press in 2017.

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Marta González

Professor Gonzalez works in the area of urban computing, with a focus on the intersections of people with the built environment and their social networks. Her team designs urban mobility solutions and to enable the sustainable development of smart cities. Prof. González has introduced new tools into transportation research and is a leader in the emergent field of urban computing.

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Marta-Marika Urbanik

Assistant Professor, University of Alberta
I am an urban ethnographer, specializing in gangs, neighbourhood redevelopment, and inner-city policing in the Canadian context. My research interests include issues pertaining to harm reduction, neighbourhood violence, gangs, neighbourhood revitalization, and police-community relations (including police misconduct).

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Martin Archer

Space Plasma Physicist, Queen Mary University of London

Dr Martin Archer is a Space Physicist at Queen Mary University of London (and Imperial College London). Martin became a published scientist whilst still an undergraduate, working on the Cluster space mission. It is this work which has inspired his PhD research on structures and waves in the Earth’s magnetosphere.

In addition to his research, Martin is determined to come up with fresh perspectives on how to communicate his love of science, especially to young audiences, and has worked on a number of exciting and unique projects including his DJ Physics shows, the Droppin’ Science Podcast, WiiJing and appearances at numerous science festivals and schools.

You’ll regularly see Martin on television both in the UK and internationally discussing the latest physics news, explaining scientific concepts and championing the importance of engaging the public with science. In addition to this Martin has featured on the BBC Radio 4 Today programme, the Guardian Science Weekly podcast and has written numerous science pieces and been profiled by a number of publications including The Guardian, The Times and MSN.

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Martin Bortz

I am a current PhD student at the University of Melbourne. I am studying the role of knowledge in public policy, and the way in which that shapes power dynamics between different political actors.

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Martin Conway

My research and publications have been driven by a number of overlapping interests in European history from roughly the 1930s to the 1960s.

One central element of that interest has been the history of Belgium, which has been much overlooked in the historiography of the twentieth century, but which provides a fascinating example of the interplay of factors of class, of ideology and of linguistic identity. I have published two books on Belgium, most recently (in 2012) The Sorrows of Belgium, and am continuing with research on its post-1945 history, most notably the so-called question royale and the history of the working class.

My other interests are broader and more comparative. I have been the editor of a number of collaborative volumes, including ones on political exiles during the Second World War, on Catholic politics, on political legitimacy in mid-twentieth century Europe, on democracy, on Europeanisation, and on violence.

All of these, though diverse in subject manner, have been primarily concerned with the interface between the social and the political. In particular, I have been concerned to explore what made (and un-made) political stability in Europe across the upheavals of the 1930s and 1940s and into the post-war period, and I am currentlky writing a book about how democracy was understood and practised in Western Europe from the Second World War to the end of the 1960s. I am also involved in a number of collaborative research projects, involving historians across Europe, and am the editor of The English Historical Review.

I teach widely on the history of this period, and have supervised a number of doctorates: on religion in France, on inter-war socialism, on aspects of Belgian history, on Catholic politics and intellectual trends. I should be happy to hear from prospective graduate students interested in working in fields relevant to my interests.

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Martin Hurcombe

I am principally interested in the relationship between representations of conflict and politics in early twentieth-century France. I am the author of Novelists in Conflict: Ideology and the Absurd in the French Combat Novel of the Great War and France and the Spanish Civil War: Cultural Representations of the War next Door, 1936-1945. I am also interested in the relationship between political commitment and utopianism and the memory of the First World War in twentieth-century French culture. I am a member of the executive committee of the Group for War and Culture Studies (GWACS), based at the Universities of Bristol, Swansea and Westminster, and am one of the editors of the Journal of War and Culture Studies. In addition to this, I also have an interest in French crime fiction, particularly the novels of Sébastien Japrisot.

My teaching interests are French literature, culture, and history of the early twentieth century. I also teach general history and literature courses in Year 1 and final-year language. I am unit convenor for two final-year units: Representations of War, which studies the depiction of war in the twentieth-century French novel and cinema, and Challenging the Republic, which examines a variety of political movements that have contested the form of the French Republic since the 1920s. In the 2nd year I convene The Third Republic, which studies the social and political history of France from 1870 to 1940, and co-teach Modern French Narrative, a unit examining French fiction from the 1920s to the present. I also teach courses on war and culture at postgraduate level and am co-supervising two M.Litt/PhD theses: James McFarthing, ‘Utopian Theory and the Science Fiction of Jules Verne’ and Claire Thomas, ‘Ungaretti, giornalista’. I am also currently Deputy Head of School Teaching and Learning.

I would particularly welcome research students working on 20th-century cultural representations of conflict and/or political engagement and cultural politics in France.

My students can consult me in my office at the following time during term times:Thursday 10-11am and 3-4pm.
Biography

I studied French and Italian at the University of Exeter where I also later completed a PGCE (after a year working at the Université de Rennes II). I spent several years in secondary education pretending that I didn't miss academia until coming to Bristol as a PhD student. I completed my doctoral thesis, 'Forming the Modern Mind: A Reappraisal of the French Combat Novel of World War One', in 2000 under the supervision of Gino Raymond. That same year, I became a lecturer here in the Department of French.

I am one of the editors of the Journal of War and Culture Studies and an executive member of the Group for War and Culture Studies, currently based at the University of Westminster.

I am a keen runner and cyclist and an occasional triathlete.

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Martin Moore

Dr Martin Moore is director of the Centre for the Study of Media, Communication and Power, and a Senior Research Fellow in the Policy Institute at King’s College London. He was previously founding director of the Media Standards Trust (2006-2015) where he directed the Election Unspun project and wrote extensively on the news media and public policy. Recent research publications include:

Election Unspun: Political Parties, the press, and Twitter during the 2015 election campaign (2015); Who was hacked? An investigation into phone hacking and its victims (2015); Addressing the Democratic Deficit in Local News through Positive Plurality (2014) and IPSO: An Assessment (2013).

He is author of The Origins of Modern Spin (Palgrave Macmillan 2006) and ‘Plurality and Local Media’ in Media Power and Plurality, ed Steven Barnett and Judith Townend (Palgrave Macmillan, 2015).

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Martin Stute

Professor of Environmental Science, Columbia University

When I was about eight-years-old, I did not speak to my parents for a whole day because they threw a banana peel out of our car, which I found was unacceptable from an environmental point of view. I knew early on that I wanted to dedicate my career to environmental issues and studied Physics, because there was no such thing as Environmental Science back then. My PhD thesis research topic at the University of Heidelberg focussed on novel tracer techniques to study the dynamics of ground water flow, and the use of ground water as an archive of paleoclimate. I have been interested in water issues ever since and can still hardly resist to take a plunge into a thermal spring I encounter or take a sip from a well that might tap an interesting aquifer. I believe that water will play an increasingly important role in our attempts to achieve a sustainable global development. I am also trying hard to be a decent teacher and undergraduate and graduate student adviser, because I think that is where faculty members have the most influence on the future of our planet.

Some of my projects include:

Health Effects and Geochemistry of Arsenic and Lead
San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD/EarthScope)
Carbon Sequestration
Natural Gas Production by Hydraulic Fracturing

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Martine Kropkowski

Tutor, The University of Queensland
Martine Kropkowski teaches professional and creative writing with the writing team at The University of Queensland. She is also a HDR candidate researching the role that language and community-generated narratives play in coercing and controlling members of cult-like organisations.

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Mary L. Churchill

Associate Dean, Strategic Partnerships and Community Engagement and Professor of the Practice, Boston University
Dr. Mary L. Churchill is Professor of the Practice and associate dean of strategic partnerships and community engagement at Boston University's Wheelock College of Education and Human Development where she also serves as Director of the Higher Education Administration program. Churchill serves as a trustee at Benjamin Franklin Cummings Institute of Technology, a 4-year minority-serving college in Boston, where she chairs the academic affairs committee. She also serves as an advisor for the American Council of Education’s Learner Success Lab. Churchill co-authored When Colleges Close: Leading in a Time of Crisis, telling the story of the Wheelock-Boston University merger. Prior to her appointment at Boston University, Churchill served as vice president for academic affairs at Wheelock College, where she helped lead the merger of Wheelock College and Boston University. She has also held leadership roles in universities and colleges in New England for over 30 years.

In 2021, Churchill served as the Chief of Policy for Mayor Kim Janey in Boston where she supported the launch of the mayor’s Children’s and Youth Cabinet, led the development of an alternative response to 911 calls for mental health emergencies, and coordinated the implementation of a city-wide COVID-19 mask mandate. Upon her return to BU, she co-chaired the Boston Career and College Pathways Partnership working group with Harvard’s Project on Workforce.

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Mary M. McCarthy

Professor of Political Science, Drake University
Mary M. McCarthy, Professor of Political Science, teaches numerous regional courses on the politics and international relations of Japan, China, and East Asia, as well as topical courses in world and comparative politics. She received her B.A. in East Asian studies and her Ph.D. in political science from Columbia University.

Dr. McCarthy specializes in Japan’s domestic and foreign policies. She has published on topics including the Japanese media, and cooperation and conflict between Japan and China in the East China Sea. Her current research examines the historical legacies of the Asia-Pacific War on Japan-U.S., Japan-China, and Japan-Korea relations. She is also a Mansfield Foundation U.S.-Japan Network for the Future Scholar.

Besides her teaching and research, Dr. McCarthy enjoys mentoring students to help them to have the most enriching experience both at Drake and beyond. In this capacity, she advises students on post-graduate opportunities in Asia, including teaching English in Japan through the prestigious Japan Exchange and Teaching Program (JET).

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Mary-Louise McLaws

Professor of Epidemiology Healthcare Infection and Infectious Diseases Control, UNSW Australia

Professor Mary-Louise McLaws is an epidemiologist who's expertise is infection control and prevention. She works in collaboration with the World Health Organization Advisor and the Clinical Excellence Commission providing advise on infection control programs and interventions to improve patient safety. Mary-Louise has partnered on patient safety improvement projects in Vietnam, Cambodia, Indonesia, Taiwan, China, Malaysia, and Turkey.

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Mashupye Herbert Maserumule

Professor of Public Affairs, Tshwane University of Technology

With twenty(20) years of teaching experience in different universities in South Africa, Maserumule is an experienced researcher. His areas of research interest include, among others, the Historiography, Ontology and Epistemology of Public Administration, Developmental State, Politics of Transition, Pan-African Thought and Philosophy of Governance.

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Mathew Herrnegger

Senior Scientist, Institute of Hydrology and Water Management, University of Natural Resources and Life Science (BOKU)
Mathew Herrnegger obtained his degree in Water Management and
Environmental Engineering in 2007 and his Ph.D. in Hydrology in 2013. He
is a Senior scientist at the Institute of Hydrology and Water Management
(HyWa), University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna. His
lecturing and research interest covers a broad range of water-related
topics, ranging from catchment hydrology to water resources management.
He has worked and (co-)authored papers on the water balance, flood and
inflow forecasting systems, model development and parameter estimation
of distributed hydrological models, machine learning, remote-sensing
hydrology, climate change impact assessments on water resources,
assessment of changes and drivers of flood risks, but also water quality
and uncertainties in erosion modelling. In East Africa, he has worked in
the Mara, the Sio-Malaba-Malakisi River Basin in the border between
Kenya and Uganda and Lake Bunyoni in the south west Uganda. Lately, his
research interest lies in understanding the lake level rises in the Rift
Valley lakes of Kenya and since 2021 he is also involved in the project
"Sustainable water quality management supporting Uganda’s development
ambitions".

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Mathieu Gautier

chercheur en génomique statistique et évolutive des populations, INRA

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Matt King

I am Professor of Polar Geodesy and ARC Future Fellow at the University of Tasmania. My field of expertise is geodetic observation of Earth deformation and the global water cycle, including ice-sheet mass balance and sea-level change and particularly using the Global Positioning System (GPS) and the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE). I also work on reduction of systematic and random errors in these techniques in order to maximise the information content in the data and improve the reliability of the interpretations. I have authored more than 80 peer-reviewed publications including several articles in the leading scientific journals Science, Nature, Nature Geoscience, Nature Climate Change and Proceedings of the National Academy of Science. In 2015 I was awarded the Royal Society (London) Kavli Medal and Lecture (see the lecture at https://royalsociety.org/events/2015/04/continental-loss).

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Matt Kranke

My doctoral research project studies the collaboration between the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and the World Bank from an ideational perspective. I seek to explain why, in marked contrast to parallel developments in the global political economy, the IMF and the World Bank opted to partly deinstitutionalise their collaboration after the global financial crisis.

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Matt McDonald

Formerly lecturer in politics and international studies at the University of New South Wales, University of Birmingham (UK) and University of Warwick (UK)

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Matthew Ashton

I'm a lecturer in politics and the media at Nottingham Trent University. I did my BA degree in politics at NTU before taking a Masters in Politics and Contemporary History at Nottingham. I returned to NTU to do a Phd on the German part system passing my viva in 2009.

My current research interests lie in the area of the British and American political and media system.

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Matthew Beard

Adjunct Lecturer, UNSW Australia

Dr. Matthew Beard is an ethicist and moral philosopher. He is currently the Writer and Content Producer at The Ethics Centre, an independent, not-for-profit organisation focused on the promotion and exploration of ethical questions.He is also an Adjunct Lecturer at UNSW Canberra's School of Humanities and Social Sciences.

Matthew was awarded his PhD from the University of Notre Dame Australia for a thesis entitled ‘War Rights and Military Virtues: A Philosophical Reappraisal of Just War Theory,’ and was the inaugural recipient of the Morris Research Scholarship from Notre Dame. He has discussed subjects including military ethics, moral injury and PTSD, cyberwar, torture, and medical ethics amongst others in book chapters, scholarly articles, radio interviews, public opinion pieces, and at academic conferences both domestically and internationally.

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Matthew Carmona

Matthew Carmona is Professor of Planning and Urban Design at the Bartlett School of Planning, UCL. He has previously lectured at the University of Nottingham and before that worked as a researcher at Strathclyde and Reading Universities and as an architect in practice.
His research has focused on the policy context for delivering better quality built and natural environments, having worked on a range of research projects examining:

design policies and guidance
design coding
residential design and development processes
delivering urban renaissance
the value of urban and architectural design
the working relationships between housing providers and planners
measuring quality in planning
managing external public space
local environmental quality and standard
London squares and high streets
governance of design, the case of CABE

Matthew is on the editorial board of ‘Urban Design Quarterly’, is European Associate Editor for the ‘Journal of Urban Design’, and edits the ‘Design in the Built Environment’ book series for Ashgate. He is a regular advisor to government and government agencies both in the UK and overseas and writes a column for Town & Country Planning, the journal of the Town & Country Planning Association. He is a Design Council CABE Built Environment Expert.
Between 2003 and 2011 Matthew Carmona served as Head of the Bartlett School of Planning.

His book "Capital Spaces: The Multiple Complex Public Spaces of a Global City" is published by Routledge: http://www.routledge.com/books/details/9780415527095

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Matthew Fielding

Research Associate / Teaching Fellow, ARC Centre of Excellence for Australian Biodiversity and Heritage (CABAH), University of Tasmania

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Matthew Freeman

Senior Lecturer in Media and Communication, Bath Spa University

Dr Matthew Freeman is Senior Lecturer in Media and Communication at Bath Spa University, where he is also Director of the Media Convergence Research Centre. He completed his PhD in Culture, Film and Media at the University of Nottingham and holds an MA and a BA (Hons) in Film and Television Studies, both from the University of Warwick. Before taking up his post at Bath Spa University in 2015, he taught at the University of Nottingham and in the School of Media at Birmingham City University.

His research concentrates on cultures of production across the borders of media and history, writing extensively on the industrial history of transmedia storytelling. He has also published on such topics as media branding, convergence cultures, and methodological approaches to media industry studies.

Matthew is the author of Historicizing Transmedia Storytelling: Early Twentieth-Century Transmedia Story Worlds (Routledge, 2017), Industrial Approaches to Media: A Methodological Gateway to Industry Studies (Palgrave Macmillan, 2016), and the co-author (with Carlos A. Scolari and Paolo Bertetti) of Transmedia Archaeology: Storytelling in the Borderlines of Science Fiction, Comics and Pulp Magazines (Palgrave Pivot, 2014). His research can also be found in journals such as The International Journal of Cultural Studies, Historical Journal of Film, Radio and Television, and International Journal of Communication.

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