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Marissa Nivison

Post-Doctoral Researcher, Department of Psychology, University of Calgary
Marissa is a Post Doctoral researcher at the University of Calgary where she studies parent-child relationships.

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Marit Haldar

Professor of Sociology, Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences

I am a professor of sociology at the University College of Oslo and Akershus in Norway. My main interests are gender studies, social politics and childhood and family Research.

My work includes analysing gender, the welfare state, vulnerable subjects and lately also differences in healthcare treatment to look at social inequality. I study standards and the general cultural understandings that produce what is understood as different, or deviant.

II have also published several international articles about research methods. Within qualitative methods I've discovered untapped data sources and developed new procedures.

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Mariya Ivancheva

Senior Lecturer, Strathclyde Institute of Education, University of Strathclyde
Mariya Ivancheva (University of Strathclyde) is an anthropologist and sociologist of higher education and labour whose work focuses on the casualisation and digitalisation of academic labour, the re/production of intersectional inequalities at universities and high-skilled labour markets, and the role of academics and students in processes of social change especially in transitions to/from socialism. She is the author of The Alternative University: Lessons from Bolivarian Venezuela (Stanford UP 2023). @mivanche

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Mariya Zheleva

Assistant Professor of Computer Science, University at Albany, State University of New York
Dr. Zheleva’s research focus is on wireless networks for infrastructure-challenged regions, characterized with low-bandwidth Internet gateways, lack of reliable electricity and sparse populations. In order to connect such regions, she has designed distributed cellular network systems to provide voice, text messaging and data connectivity. She is also working on Dynamic Spectrum Access systems to for long-distance high-bandwidth connectivity.

In the past, Dr. Zheleva has worked on other projects related to wireless networking including monitoring, medium access control for 60 GHz networks and smart phones.

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Marjan Biria

Research Fellow of Mental Health Neuroscience, UCL
I have a Bachelor's degree in Clinical Psychology and a Master's degree in Neuroscience. My master's project was about predicting schizophrenia development in patients with a high genetic predisposition using high-density EEG with 256 electrodes. I also have a background in Computer Science.

During my PhD in Cognitive Neuroscience from the University of Cambridge, under the supervision of Professor Trevor Robbins and with Professor Barbara Sahakian as my advisor, I studied compulsive behaviour in patients with OCD using clinical scales and a computer task to measure habitual versus goal-directed behaviour. We used 7T proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (1H-MRS) to measure neurochemical imbalance in brain regions important in the pathophysiology of OCD.

After designing and developing a new computer paradigm to measure checking behaviour (one of the most common symptoms of OCD) in a laboratory setting, I also studied the relationship between brain metabolites and checking behaviour in patients with OCD using 7T 1H-MRS.

Additionally, I also studies OCD symptoms of clozapine-treated patients with schizophrenia, showing OCD symptoms as a consequence of their treatment, under clinical supervision of Dr Emilio Fernandez-Egea. We used clinical scales and novel computer tasks to characterise clinical symptoms in patients with OCD, schizo-OCS, pure schizophrenia compared to each other and to healthy controls.

At the moment I am a Post-doctoral Research Fellow at UCL, working with Professor Argyris Stringers and Dr Georgina Krebs. I am designing a new computer task that allows us to capture the relevant factors underlying improvements in Cognitive Behavioural Therapy, and model them using mathematical models.

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Marjorie Sarbaugh-Thompson

Professor of Political Science, Wayne State University
Marjorie Sarbaugh-Thompson is a professor of Political Science at Wayne State University. Her research focuses on state legislative term limits and legislative oversight of the executive branch. She was the principal investigator on a major study of term limits in Michigan that involved interviews with 460 state legislators over 10 years as Michigan implemented a state term limits ballot initiative. She participated in two studies of legislative oversight of the executive branch in collaboration with the Levin Center at Wayne State University’s Law School, a 50 state study of oversight and a study of contract monitoring in selected states. She also serves as the Academic Director of the State Oversight Academy at the Levin Center for Oversight and Democracy.

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Mark Andrew

Senior Lecturer in Housing Economics, City, University of London
Dr. Mark Andrew joined the real estate group at Bayes (formerly Cass) in January 2007. He was previously a Lecturer in Economics at the University of Reading. Mark's research interests are in the fields of housing economics, micro-econometrics and panel data analysis. Dr. Andrew has published in journals such as Environment and Planning A, Real Estate Economics, Regional Science & Urban Economics, Housing Economics and the Scottish Journal of Political Economy. He has also been involved in a number of government funded projects for the DCLG and Office of the Deputy Prime Minister as well as a number of ESRC funded projects. He is currently serving as a member of the Research Steering Group for the Investment Property Forum (IPF).

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Mark Bailey

Faculty Member and Chair, Cyber Intelligence and Data Science, National Intelligence University
Dr. Mark Bailey writes about the intersection between artificial intelligence, complexity, and national security. He is a faculty member at the National Intelligence University, where he is the Department Chair for Cyber Intelligence and Data Science, as well as the Co-Director of the Data Science Intelligence Center. His work has appeared in publications such as the journal Futures, Nautilus, and Homeland Security Today. Previously, he worked as a data scientist on several AI programs in the U.S. Department of Defense and the Intelligence Community. He is also an Officer in the U.S. Army Reserve. In his spare time, he does ceramics, is a beekeeper, and endeavors to turn his yard into a vegetable garden.

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Mark Beaumont

Professor of Statistics, University of Bristol
I am a biologist by background, and I am interested in general problems of statistical inference in population genetics, evolutionary biology, and conservation genetics. Most of my work has involved Monte Carlo statistical methods. Particular areas of application that interest me include: detecting evidence of selection in the genome; modelling demographic history of populations; inference in structured populations; modelling temporally sampled genetic data; inference in agent-based models.

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Mark Beeson

Mark Beeson is Professor of International Politics at the University of Western Australia. Before joining UWA at the beginning of 2015, he was Professor of International Relations at Murdoch University. Previously he taught at the universities of Griffith, Queensland, York (UK) and Birmingham, where he was also head of department. He is co-editor of Contemporary Politics, and the founding editor of Critical Studies of the Asia Pacific (Palgrave)

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Mark Bennister

Associate Professor, University of Lincoln
Mark Bennister joined the University of Lincoln in 2018. He is Director, Lincoln Policy Hub and Director of the Lincoln Parliamentary Research Centre (ParliLinc). He was Reader in Politics at Canterbury Christ Church University from 2010 until 2018. Mark was a parliamentary academic fellow 2016-19. He previously held positions at UCL and the University of Sussex. He gained his DPhil from Sussex in 2009. Mark is a an Associate Research Fellow at the Crick Centre, University of Sheffield and was a Visiting Lecturer, Tufts University. Mark worked as an Executive Officer at the Australian High Commission in London from 1998 until 2004. He also worked as a parliamentary researcher at the House of Commons and European Parliament from 1993 until 1997.

Mark is an expert in comparative prime ministerial leadership. He published 'Prime Ministers in Power: A Comparative Study of Political Leadership in Britain and Australia' in March 2012 and 'The Leadership Capital Index' in 2017. Mark gained his doctorate from the University of Sussex (2004-2008), where he was awarded a 1+3 ESRC studentship. Mark has an MSc in Social Research (Sussex 2005), MA in Contemporary European Studies (Loughborough 1993), and BA Hons in Social Sciences (Nottingham Trent University 1990).

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Mark Bloomberg

Adjunct Senior Fellow Te Kura Ngahere – New Zealand School of Forestry, University of Canterbury

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Mark Briffa

Professor of Animal Behaviour, University of Plymouth
Mark Briffa is Professor of Animal Behaviour at the University of Plymouth, U.K. He has studied the behaviour of hermit crabs since 1995. He gained a PhD on this topic at Queen’s University Belfast and conducted post-doctoral research there, before moving to Plymouth in 2004 for a lectureship in marine biology. As well as studying the effects of human impacts on behaviour he is also interested in animal contests and animal personality, which he studies in hermit crabs, sea anemones and other marine animals.

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Mark C. Pachucki

Dr. Pachucki is a sociologist who investigates phenomena at the intersection of culture, social determinants of health, and social network dynamics. While it is commonly accepted that culture and social context reciprocally shape our health, an expanded understanding of how the structure and meanings of relationships can affect individuals' health behaviors is aided by perspectives from computational social science. If we can better understand how individuals are connected during and across different stages of their life, we gain insight into changes in health behaviors and social status, as well as disparities in these outcomes at the interpersonal and population level. He was trained under an interdisciplinary social science model that prioritizes a “right to health” and that sees many of the cumulative disadvantages that emerge from intersecting group-based differences as unjust and avoidable.

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Mark Chapman

Associate Professor, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Southampton
Dr Mark Chapman is an Associate Professor in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and his research focuses on working out what genes do.

He works with a range of plants (and some animals) and carries out detailed genetic and genomic investigations comparing populations or species.

His research identifies the genes that are important for adaptation, speciation and domestication; therefore it is important for the fields of evolutionary biology, genomics and mitigating climate change.

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Mark Charlton

Net Zero Research Theme Director, De Montfort University
Dr Mark Charlton currently holds the role of Net Zero and Climate Action Research Theme Director at De Montfort University. Mark is also Associate Director of Sustainable Development Goal Impact and also teaches policy in the department of Politics. He leads the United Nations Academic Impact Global hub for Sustainable Development Goal 16, based at DMU. Mark’s current research looks at efforts to tackle climate change through political participation in marginalised communities. His current research is working with amateur football clubs to help them achieve Net Zero. Mark also leads a project focussed on refugee advocacy.

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Mark Clapson

I gained a BA (Hons) in History from the University of Lancaster in 1982, and an MA in Modern Social History at Lancaster in 1983. I was awarded my doctorate at the University of Warwick in 1989 on the history of betting and gambling in England from 1823-1961.

I have previously worked at the Open University and the University of Bedfordshire. Following my early research on the history of betting and gambling in Britain, I increasingly focused on suburbanization and new town development, and currently work on air raids, the reconstruction of London since the Blitz, and sectarianism and suburban housing in Belfast. So 'conflict and the city' sums up my present research neatly enough.

I have widespread academic impact. My research has been translated into Dutch, French, Italian and Japanese, and I have given conference and seminar papers in Australia, Britain, Canada, Belgium, Brazil, Finland, France, Italy, Japan, Portugal, Spain and the USA. I have over 450 citations on Google Scholar. I have also been widely interviewed by the media, notably for BBC Radio 4, BBC Three Counties Radio, and the Economist.

Serving on the AHRC Peer Review College, the Steering Committee of History UK (HE), the Editorial Board of Planning Perspectives, the Editorial Board of the University of Westminster Press, and the Editorial Board of the Journal of Administrative Sciences (Yönetim Bilimleri Dergisi (Turkey), I am actively engaged in national and international networks of academic historians. I am one of the international participants in the University of Antwerp's Urban Studies Institute network “Urban Agency: The Historical Fabrication of the City as an object of study”, a five-year programme of workshops that began in January, 2016. In December 2015 I was invited onto the 'Panel of experts' of the Romualdo del Bianco Foundation, Florence.

I have refereed articles for many historical journals, and also town planning journals. I am a peer reviewer for the AHRC, the Leverhulme Trust and FWO (Belgium).

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Mark Constantine IV

Researcher, UNSW Sydney
I am an environmental geographer and paleoecologist specializing in past wildfires (bushfires) and environmental change. I recieved my PhD from the University of New South Wales and my MA from Seoul National University, South Korea. Prior to starting my research career I was a teacher, a garbageman, a tour bus driver and a full-time cyclist. In my spare time I like to teach, search for treasures in north shore council cleanups, ride my bike and take walks with my wife and son.

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Mark Coulson

Associate Professor in Psychology, University of East Anglia

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Mark Davies

Laboratory Head, Doherty Institute, The University of Melbourne
Dr Mark Davies completed his PhD at the Queensland Institute of Medical Research in 2007, before undertaking postdoctoral studies at the University of York in the UK. In 2009, he was awarded an NHMRC postdoctoral training fellowship within the laboratory of Professor Gordon Dougan at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, UK and Prof Mark Walker the University of Queensland. In late 2015, he was appointed as the Inaugural Doherty – Sanger Fellow within the Department of Microbiology and Immunology. His principle research interests are in the application of genome sequencing approaches to understanding emergence and evolution of key bacterial pathogens including Streptococcus pyogenes.

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Mark Faulkner

Assistant Professor in Medieval Literature and Director, Trinity Centre for the Book, Trinity College Dublin
I joined the School of English at Trinity in September 2016 after four years as Lecturer in Medieval English at the University of Sheffield, having previously taught at University College Cork and in Oxford, where I completed my D. Phil under the supervision of the late palaeographer M. B. Parkes. Partly in tribute to Malcolm, I am currently co-editing the three-volume History of Punctuation in English Literature for Cambridge University Press with Jeff Guttierez (Boston), John Lennard (Cambridge) and Elizabeth Bonapfel (Berlin).

My research focuses on material and cultural aspects of medieval textual production, dissemination and reception. The majority of my work hitherto has concerned the twelfth century and the afterlife of Old English and the emergence of early Middle English, but I have published across the whole range of medieval literature, from Beowulf to sixteenth-century performances of medieval drama.

Much of my work has involved (re-)editing and (re-)considering neglected twelfth-century English language texts. I have published numerous articles on these texts, and my book-length study of the period, A New Literary History of the Long Twelfth Century: Language and Literature between Old and Middle English came out with Cambridge University Press in 2022. This was a period of dramatic political, cultural and linguistic change, in which the Latin and English literate cultures of late Anglo-Saxon England were shifted into a new configuration with Latin and French as the prestige languages. My work has focused on three main elements:

Placing the production, reception and use of surviving twelfth-century texts in detailed regional, cultural and political contexts.
Augmenting the number of English texts known to have been written in the twelfth century.
Comprehending in greater detail the linguistic history of twelfth-century English, to facilitate the redating of texts and to understand the sociolinguistic constraints which affected those using English.
To draw further attention to writing in English from the period, I am currently producing a Critical Anthology of Twelfth-Century English: Writing the Vernacular in the Transitional Period for Arc Humanities Press, to be published in early 2025.

Much of my research is concerned with telling the story of particular manuscripts: when and where they were written, and who read them and why. To do this as thoroughly as possible, I use a wide range of methodologies from literary studies, linguistics, history, palaeography and codicology. Recently, I have been exploring using large corpora and data analytics to assist in this work. With the help of funding from the Irish Research Council, I hosted a colloquium on Big Data and Medieval Studies: the Present and Future of Medieval Text Archives in June 2017, and from 2019-2024 I will hold a Provost’s Project Award for Medieval Big Dating, which will explore quantitative and perhaps computational methods to develop ‘big data’ techniques to assist in the dating of texts from the Old and early Middle English periods. I am the developer of the TOXIIC (Trinity Old English from the XIIth Century) corpus, version 1 of which was released in 2018. Version 2, a collaboration with Elisabetta Magnanti (Vienna), which uses machine learning to transcribe the manuscripts, is in progress and should be released in late 2022 or early 2023. From 2022 to 2024, I am PI on the IRC-Coalesce-funded project, Searobend: Linked Metadata for English-Language Text, 1000-1300, a collaboration with Prof. Declan O’Sullivan, from the School of Computer Science and Statistics at TCD.

In Trinity, you’ll find me giving lectures on the various fresher medieval options and teaching sophister options on manuscripts, language contact, distant reading and translation.

Part of my role is working with the Library to showcase Trinity’s world-class collection of medieval manuscripts. In 2017/8, in partnership with the Long Room Hub and the Library I organised a series of public lectures on Trinity’s manuscripts entitled Beyond the Book of Kells. This has led to the discovery of some unnoticed treasures. I have also organised conferences on individual Trinity manuscripts, such as the Dublin Apocalypse (MS. 64), and been active in the Library’s Carnegie-Funded Manuscripts for Medieval Studies Project, which has so far seen the digitisation of twenty manuscripts, including the famous Book of St Albans (MS. 177). I led the development of the new Trinity Centre for the Book in 2022, and am now its inaugural Director.

You can view a full list of my publications as part of my TCD research profile.

At postgraduate level, I was inaugural Director of the M. Phil in Medieval Studies from 2019-2022. I welcome enquiries from students interested in late Old English, early Middle English, manuscript studies, historical linguistics and corpus or computational approaches to the literature of any period.

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Mark Finlayson

Associate Professor of Computer Science, Florida International University
I am the Eminent Scholar Chaired Associate Professor of Computer Science in FIU's Knight Foundation School of Computing and Information Sciences.

Research Interests

I study the science of narrative, including understanding the relationship between narrative, cognition, and culture, developing new methods and techniques for investigating questions related to language and narrative, and endowing machines with the ability to understand and use narratives for a variety of applications. Key problems I have addressed so far include: extracting high-level narrative structure from sets of stories; techniques for discourse processing; temporal information extraction; general natural language processing; the creation, annotation, and manipulation of language resources; and collecting richly annotated corpora of stories. My research intersects computational linguistics, artificial intelligence, cognitive science, computational social science, and the digital humanities.

Brief Bio

I received my Ph.D. in Computer Science from MIT in 2012 under the supervision of Professor Patrick H. Winston. Following that, I was a Research Scientist in the MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory for 2½ years. I received my S.M. in 2001 from MIT, and the B.S. in 1998 from the University of Michigan, both in Electrical Engineering. I received promotion and tenure in Summer of 2020. While at FIU my work has been funded by NSF, NIH, ONR, DARPA, DHS, and IBM.

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Mark Forshaw

Professor of Health Psychology, Edge Hill University
I am a nationally and internationally recognised expert in training in psychology, through my work with the British Psychological Society and the European Federation of Psychologists Associations. I have consulted for a range of organisations across the world, both public and private sector, on training, continuing professional development, critical thinking, and leadership.

I founded Crisis and Resilience Expertise (CaRE), a collaborative home for researchers internationally who are working on projects relating to pandemics and any aspect of human crisis such as terrorism, natural disaster and economic crashes.

I have previously been President of the Institute of Health Promotion and Education, a BPS Trustee, a member of the Registration Authority of The Science Council, a board member of the Occupational Safety and Health Consultants Register, and have been Chair of various boards and committees including the BPS DHP Training Committee, the Membership and Standards Board, the Board of Examiners in Health Psychology and the Qualifications Standards Committee. I served on the EFPA European Awarding Committee for the EuroPsy certification.

I am the author of 12 books for students, health professionals and the public, most recently Health Psychology in Clinical Practice.

https://www.routledge.com/Health-Psychology-in-Clinical-Practice/Forshaw/p/book/9780367637316

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Mark Friedlander

PhD Candidate, Victorian College of the Arts, The University of Melbourne
Mark Friedlander is an exhibiting artist and university educator.

His PhD research is on the effect of risk management on artworks and art practice.

Principally based in the Teaching Workshop at the Victorian College of the Arts, Mark works with students on the exploration of art material processes.

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Mark Giancaspro

Mark Giancaspro is a Lecturer at the University of Adelaide Law School. He holds an honours degree in Laws and Legal Practice from Flinders University and a PhD from the University of Adelaide. His legal employment background and research interests are both primarily commercial, with issues in contract law and its various applications being his principal theme. Mark teaches in contract law, business law, tort law and sports law and has published widely on matters including issues with the formation and renegotiation of contracts, and the doctrine of consideration. He is on the editorial committee for the Alternative Law Journal and has volunteered at community legal centres.

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Mark Goldsworthy

Senior Research Scientist, CSIRO
Dr Mark Goldsworthy is a senior research scientist at CSIRO, whose research interests include:

big data analysis and science

mathematical & statistical modelling

energy systems analysis

computational and simulation sciences

building thermal physics

net zero emissions

air conditioning

computational fluid dynamics & heat transfer

mechanical engineering

software development.

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Mark Graham

Mark Graham is an Associate Professor and Senior Research Fellow at the OII, a Research Fellow at Green Templeton College, and an Associate in the University of Oxford’s School of Geography and the Environment.

He has published articles in major geography, communications, and urban studies journals, and his work has been covered by the Economist, the BBC, the Washington Post, CNN, the Guardian, and many other newspapers and magazines. He is an editorial board member of Information, Communication, and Society, Geo:Geography, and the Environment, and Big Data and Society. He is also a member of DFID’s Digital Advisory Panel and the ESRC’s Peer Review College.

In 2014, he was awarded a European Research Council Starting Grant to lead a team to study 'knowledge economies' in Sub-Saharan Africa over five years. This will entail looking at both low-end (virtual labour and microwork) and high-end (innovation hubs and bespoke information services) in fifteen African cities.

Research interests

Internet Geography, ICT for development, globalization, economic geography, transportation and communications, social theory, transparency, user-generated content, Southeast Asia, East Africa, zombies

You can follow him on Twitter at @geoplace

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Mark Hancock

Professor of Physiotherapy, Macquarie University
Mark Hancock is a Professor of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Medicine and Health Science, Macquarie University. He has over 20 years of clinical experience as a musculoskeletal physiotherapist working in a primary care setting. Mark now works primarily as an academic/researcher. His research focuses on the diagnosis and management of back pain.

Mark completed his PhD at the University of Sydney in 2007. He has published over 200 peer reviewed papers and received over $11 million in funding to support his research. He has published in leading medical journals (e.g. NEJM, Lancet and BMJ and discipline specific journals (e.g. Spine and Journal of Physiotherapy). His work has been accompanied by editorials and received wide media attention. Professor Hancock is a member of the associate editorial board for the Cochrane Back Review Group and Journal of Physiotherapy board member.

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Mark Hoggard

DECRA Research Fellow, Australian National University
I am a DECRA Research Fellow working in the Research School of Earth Sciences, Australian National University. I previously studied at the University of Cambridge, Harvard and Columbia Universities before moving to Australia in 2021.

My research is primarily focused on geoscience problems that are relevant to society. I am actively undertaking projects in sea-level modelling, critical mineral deposits, and identification of underground nuclear tests. More broadly, I am an observational geodynamicists specialising in the integration of geological and geophysical datasets with numerical models to better understand processes that have shaped the Earth.

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Mark Huffman

Professor of Medicine, Washington University in St Louis
I am a Professor of Medicine and Co-Director of the Global Health Center at Washington University in St. Louis. I also have a secondary appointment at The George Institute for Global Health, University of New South Wales in Australia. I am a practicing preventive cardiologist, researcher, and educator and have more than a decade of experience in global cardiovascular epidemiology, clinical trials, implementation research, and health policy research and training. My research seeks to improve global cardiovascular health and health care in low- and middle-income countries and to bring lessons learned back to the United States.

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Mark Hughes

Professor of Social Work, Southern Cross University
Mark Hughes is a social worker and has worked in health, aged care and mental health settings in both Australia and the UK. His research interests centre around ageing and the delivery of health and aged care services to older people. He is currently engaged in a program of research on ageing in lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ+) communities, which has involved projects on sexual identity expression in health and aged care, lesbian and gay people's experiences and expectations in accessing services, and the care networks of older LGBTQ+ people. In addition to work on ageing, Mark has also published more broadly on social work and social work education. Mark is currently Professor of Social Work and Editor of the Australasian Journal on Ageing.

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Mark Hulett

Professor and Head of Department, La Trobe University
Prof Hulett is the current Head of Department of Biochemistry and Chemistry at La Trobe University and has over 30 years of experience as a researcher in molecular immunology.

Prof Hulett completed his doctoral studies in 1994 at The University of Melbourne on immune cell receptors in inflammation and allergy. He was awarded an NHMRC Peter Doherty Postdoctoral Fellowship (1995-1998) to continue his work on immune receptors at the Austin Research Institute. Prof Hulett moved to the John Curtin School of Medical Research (JCSMR) at The Australian National University in 1999 where he cloned the enzyme heparanase and described its important role in inflammatory disease and cancer. Following the awarding of a Viertel Senior Medical Research Fellowship in 2002, Prof Hulett established an independent laboratory at the JCSMR to study molecular aspects of immune and tumour cell migration. In 2008 Prof Hulett moved his research group to the Department of Biochemistry at La Trobe University. His current research interests include inflammation and the tumour microenvironment, as well as the mechanism of action and therapeutic application of host defense peptides. Prof Hulett’s research has a strong translational focus and he has collaborated with a number of biotechnology companies including Progen Industries Ltd and Hexima Ltd. He has published over 130 peer-reviewed papers that have attracted 9500+ citations, as well as 8 patents, and his research has been recognized with a number of prestigious awards including the Howard Florey Medal and a Tall Poppy Science Award. Prof Hulett is a passionate advocate for science and medical research having been a past-president of the Australian Society of Medical Research (2008) and national board director (2009-2019). He has previously held the positions of Research Director (2015-2016) and Deputy Director (2017-2019) of the La Trobe Institute for Molecular Science at La Trobe University. Prof Hulett is the current Head of Department of Biochemistry and Chemistry at La Trobe University (2020-present).

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Mark Humphery-Jenner

Associate Professor of Finance, UNSW Australia

Mark is an Associate Professor of Finance at UNSW Business School. His research interests are mainly in corporate governance and in law & finance. His work has appeared in major finance journals such as Journal of Financial Economics, Review of Financial Studies, and Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis. He received his PhD in finance from UNSW in 2012 and has also received qualifications in law.

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Mark Jordan

Lecturer in Housing Law, University of Southampton
Dr Mark Jordan lectures in land law, housing law and housing rights at Southampton Law School, University of Southampton. His main field of interest is exploring how housing rights are employed by social movements in campaigns around housing. He is currently working on a number of national and international housing law and policy collaborative research projects which focus on the growing role of tenants unions in Scotland and Spain, regulation of local authority housing in Ireland, student housing in England, the law and homelessness in Ireland and EU regulation of mortgage lending.

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Mark Juergensmeyer

Professor of Sociology and Global Studies, University of California, Santa Barbara
Mark Juergensmeyer is Distinguished Professor of Sociology and Global Studies and the founding director of the Orfalea Center for Global and International Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He is an expert on religious violence, conflict resolution and South Asian religion and politics, and has published more than three hundred articles and thirty books. His widely-read Terror in the Mind of God: The Global Rise of Religious Violence (University of California Press, 4th edition 2017), is based on interviews with religious activists around the world--including Buddhist extremists in Myanmar, leaders of Hamas, imprisoned activists associated with al Qaeda and the Islamic State, and Christian militants in the United States--and was listed by the Washington Post and the Los Angeles Times as one of the best nonfiction books of the year. A previous book, Global Rebellion: Religious Challenges to the Secular State (University of California Press, 2008) covers the rise of new nationalisms in response to the global decline of the secular state. It was named by the New York Times as one of the notable books of the year. His book on Gandhian conflict resolution has been reprinted as Gandhi's Way (University of California Press, Revised Edition, 2005), and was selected as Community Book of the Year at the University of California, Davis. He has co-edited The Encyclopedia of Global Religions (Sage Publications 2007), The Oxford Handbook of Global Religions (Oxford University Press 2007), and co-edited with Saskia Sassen and Manfred Steger the Oxford Handbook of Global Studies (Oxford University Press 2019). He co-edited with Craig Calhoun and Jonathan vanAntwerpen Rethinking Secularism (Oxford University Press 2011). His latest book is God and War: A Meditation on Religion and Warfare (Oxford University Press 2020). He has received research fellowships from the Wilson Center in Washington D.C., the Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation, the U.S. Institute of Peace, and the American Council of Learned Societies. He is the 2003 recipient of the Grawemeyer Award for contributions to the study of religion, and is the 2004 recipient of the Silver Award of the Queen Sofia Center for the Study of Violence in Spain. He received an Honorary Doctorate from Lehigh University in 2004 and a Distinguished Teaching Award from the University of California, Santa Barbara in 2006. Since the events of September 11 he has been a commentator in the news media, including CNN, NBC, CBS, BBC, and NPR.

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