Menu

Search

Robert Winstanley-Chesters

Robert is a Research Fellow at Australian National University, College of Asia and the Pacific and a Visiting Research Fellow in the School of Geography at the University of Leeds. He obtained his doctorate from Leeds’ with the Thesis “Ideology and the Production of Landscape in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea”. Rowman and Littlefield’s Lexington Press published Robert’s monograph “Environment, Politics and Ideology in North Korea: Landscape as Political Project” in November 2014. Robert's new monograph "New Goddesses of Mt Paektu: Gender, Violence, Myth and Transformation in Korean Landscapes" co-authored with Victoria Ten will be published in winter 2016/2017 with Lexington Press. Robert is currently researching the Historical Geographies of Korean forestry, Colonial Mineralogical landscapes/inheritances, the place of topography within Pyongyang's charismatic narrative of the life of Kim Jong-suk and Animal/Creaturely Geographies of North Korea.

  More

Less

Robert Yablon

Associate Professor of Law, Co-Director of the State Democracy Research Initiative, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Robert Yablon is an Associate Professor of Law and Faculty Co-Director of the State Democracy Research Initiative. His research interests include political and election law, constitutional law, federal and state courts, and statutory interpretation. He teaches Civil Procedure, Federal Jurisdiction, and the Law of Democracy.

Professor Yablon's recent publications have appeared in the NYU Law Review, Northwestern University Law Review, Minnesota Law Review, and Iowa Law Review. In 2018, UW Law students honored Professor Yablon with the Classroom Teacher of the Year Award, and in 2019 he received a University Distinguished Teaching Award.

Professor Yablon received his bachelor's degree in economics and political science from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and his master's degree in social policy from the University of Oxford, where he was a Rhodes Scholar. He then earned his J.D. at Yale Law School, where he was an Articles Editor of the Yale Law Journal.

Following law school, Professor Yablon served as a law clerk for Judge William Fletcher of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit and for U.S. Supreme Court Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Sonia Sotomayor. He also worked in private practice at Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP in San Francisco and Washington, D.C. He has been the principal author of dozens of appellate and trial-level briefs, and has argued in a number of state and federal courts, including the U.S. Supreme Court.

  More

Less

Robert A.R. Guldemond

Researcher, Conservation Ecology Research Unit, University of Pretoria

  More

Less

Robert Andrew Robergs

Associate Professor - Exercise Physiology, Queensland University of Technology
I completed a B.Ed. in Physical Education and Geography at the State College of Victoria-Rusden Campus (now Deakin University) in 1978. I commenced a Masters Preliminary year (Exercise Science) at the University of Western Australia in 1985, and then moved to the USA to complete a M.Ed. in Exercise and Sports Science and Cardiac Rehabilitation at Wake Forest University (North Carolina) in 1987. I completed a PhD in Human Bioenergetics at Ball State University in Indiana in 1990. I accepted an academic appointment at the University of New Mexico in 1990, where I eventually received tenure and was promoted to Professor. I left the USA for a return to Australia in 2011, where I worked at Charles Sturt University as a Research Professor from 2011-2016. I then commenced a research and teaching appointment at Queensland University of Technology in 2016.

  More

Less

Robert B. Gibson

Professor of Environment, Resources and Sustainability, University of Waterloo
Robert B. Gibson is a professor in the School of Environment, Resources and Sustainability at the University of Waterloo, specializing in environmental policy issues and broader sustainability imperatives and applications. He has been involved with impact assessment law, policy and process issues since the mid 1970s.

  More

Less

Robert Chao Romero

Associate Professor of Chicana/o and Central American Studies, University of California, Los Angeles
Robert Chao Romero received his Ph.D. from UCLA in Latin American history and his Juris Doctor from U.C. Berkeley. His research explores the little-known history of Asian-Latinos, as well as the role of Christianity in social justice movements in Latin America and among U.S. Latinas/os. Romero is the author of several books, including, “The Chinese in Mexico, 1882-1940” and “Brown Church: Five Centuries of Latina/o Social Justice, Theology, and Identity.” “The Chinese in Mexico” received the Latina/o Studies book award from the Latin American Studies Association and “Brown Church” received the InterVarsity Press Readers’ Choice Award for best academic title. Romero is also an attorney, ordained minister, and faith rooted community organizer.

  More

Less

Robert J. Stephens

Principal Lecturer in Religion, Clemson University
Dr. Rob Stephens is a lifelong student with interests in Asian philosophies and the history of religions. He earned a B.A. cum laude in Religious Studies (with emphasis in biblical studies and early Christianity) from Missouri State University, an M.A. in Religious Studies (with emphasis in method and theory in Religious Studies) from the University of Kansas, and a Ph.D. in Religious Studies (in the History of Asian Religions and Cultures track) from the University of Iowa. Dr. Stephens joined the Clemson faculty in 2010 after holding teaching appointments at the University of Northern Iowa, the University of Alabama, Transylvania University, and Lindenwood University. He regularly offers classes such as Introduction to Religion, World Religions, Hinduism, Buddhism, and upper-level seminar courses on topics related to South Asia. Dr. Stephens has published several book chapters, peer-reviewed articles, and book reviews in The Journal of Asian Studies, The Journal of Church and State, Religious Studies Review, Nidan: An International Journal for Indian Studies, and The Journal of International and Global Studies. He has served as an editorial consultant for Oxford University Press, Routledge University Press, and The Asian Journal of Communication. In 2020, Dr. Stephens was selected to join Clemson University’s Fulbright-Hayes India team tasked with expanding educational awareness of and institutional partnerships with India at Clemson University and the state of South Carolina

  More

Less

Robert John Young

My research has always been focused on understanding animal behaviour and how it can be used to improve animal conservation and animal welfare. Although, much of his research is applied some of it addresses fundamental questions about how animals communicate, for example. In recent times my captive research has focused on questions regarding “Fitness for the Ark”; that is, can captive (zoo) animals be used in reintroduction programmes and what training might they need to survive in the wild. In the field I have studied primates, maned wolves, fish and birds. I am particularly interested in the human wildlife interface in how sound pollution from mining activities affects wildlife. And in human-animal interactions in urban environments especially how such interactions can be managed. My research approach is both interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary as I believe strongly that this is how we will be able to answer the ‘big questions’. Thus, I collaborate widely with researchers that include engineers, geographers, mathematicians, psychologists and sport scientists.

I have always been fascinated by the natural world and the need to conserve it for future generations. Thus, I studied Biology BSc (Hons) at the University of Nottingham (graduated 1989), followed by a PhD at the University of Edinburgh (graduated 1993) in animal behaviour/animal welfare under the supervision of Prof. Alistair Lawrence. I then embarked on a wildlife career working as Research Coordinator for the Royal Zoological Society of Scotland (Edinburgh Zoo), where I was able to put into practice much of the theory I had gained during my university education. In 2001, I moved to Brazil, as a Professor of Animal Behaviour, to further fulfill my ambition to study wildlife. Here I developed a number of long term research projects on primate species (notably titi monkeys and marmosets), birds, carnivores and urban wildlife. At the beginning of 2013 I moved to the University of Salford to take-up a Chair in Wildlife Conservation.

  More

Less

Robert Joseph Gill

Associate Professor in Media and Communication, Swinburne University of Technology, Swinburne University of Technology
Rob Gill is the Course Director for Media and Communication at Swinburne University of Technology. He has been an academic in Public Relations & Advertising at Swinburne since 2007. Rob completed his doctorate in 2006 on the theme “Employee Engagement.” His current research interests include brand communication and reputation management, particularly in sport. Rob is an active Fellow of the Communication and Public Relations Australia (CPRA) association and the International Association of Business Communicators (IABC), and a graduate of the Corporate Public Affairs Institute residential program. Rob has been awarded 3 national teaching citations and was awarded the 2017 national PRIA Educator of the Year. Before becoming an academic, he worked for more than 10 years as a communication manager in the fields of finance, tourism and state government. Prior to this, Rob spent 15 years teaching in Australia and internationally.

  More

Less

Robert L. Ascah

Research Fellow, The Parkland Institute, University of Alberta
Worked at Alberta Treasury and Alberta Treasury Branches for 25 years concentrating on public debt issuance, financial sector policy and economics. Director, Institute for Public Economics at University of Alberta Economics' department from 2009-13, Have contributed opinion pieces since 2010 in Edmonton Journal and Calgary Herald. I have been published in Alberta Views (April 2020) and CBC opinion piece on the Alberta budget. Since 2018 two co-authored and one sole-authored reports for the Parkland Institute.

  More

Less

Robert Leslie Thomson

Associate Professor, FitzPatrick Institute of African Ornithology, University of Cape Town, University of Cape Town
Robert has a broad interest in bird ecology, but is especially interested in between-species interactions. He comes from Pretoria, and grew up birding and ringing in the bushveld areas. He did his undergraduate studies at the University of Pretoria, studying mixed species bird flocks for his BSc Hons. These studies led to him being a field assistant in northern Finland. This stint became his MSc thesis at the University of Oulu, which tested the heterospecific attraction hypothesis that migrant songbirds attract to resident songbirds during their habitat selection decisions. He continued with his PhD in Oulu, further investigating the positive associations in Boreal bird communities, but incorporating the interplay of negative, predation and competition, interactions. He defended his thesis in 2006, and moved to southern Finland to take up a post-doc position at the University of Turku investigating various aspects of raptors and their impact on songbird community structure.

During the avian influenza (AI) crises in 2007, Robert led AI surveillance efforts in Cambodia for the Wildlife Conservation Society, and assisted with surveillance work in Mongolia. He then returned to Finland where he held a series of research fellowships investigating avian habitat selection decisions in the face of ‘enemies’ and the life history of endangered wader populations in the Bothnian bay.

Robert has also initiated three new research projects in the last few years that use unique study systems to answer questions of interest. He has been working on:

1) The importance of Sociable Weaver colonies in the Kalahari and their use by other avian species and other taxa. Investigating how these communities and their interactions change at weaver nests across aridity gradients. This work has also focused on the African Pygmy Falcon, an obligate user of these weaver nests, and their life history and interactions with their weaver hosts.

2) Understanding front-line defences in brood parasite – host interactions. For these studies he is using the redstart-common cuckoo system, unique because the redstart is the only known cavity nesting host of the common cuckoo, that present interesting challenges for the cuckoo.

3) An applied project to understand the role of farmers in vulture conservation in southern Africa. Taking interdisciplinary approaches to understand the factors that affect the use of poison by farmers and human-wildlife conflicts. And focusing on the role that supplementary feeding efforts by farmers can play, and assessing the services that vultures may provide in terms of carcass.

  More

Less

Robert P. Jackson

Senior Lecturer in Political Thought, Manchester Metropolitan University
I am an Edward W. Said Fellow 2024 at the Heyman Center for the Humanities (Columbia University, NY). I am currently developing a book project on Said’s conception of ‘critical consciousness’ and its relationship with the thought of Antonio Gramsci. My areas of specialism are political theory and the history of modern political thought. My research addresses issues at the intersection of critical and postcolonial thought, in particular re-examining the role of intellectuals in modern society.

I have forthcoming articles in Interventions and Notebooks, and I am co-editor of Revisiting Gramsci’s Notebooks (Brill, 2020), a rich collection of innovative scholarship on Gramsci (also in paperback). I have published work in TOPOI, Theory and Event, Thesis Eleven, Gramsciana, Hegel Bulletin, Journal for Critical Education Policy Studies, Science and Society, and the International Gramsci Journal.

Before joining Manchester Metropolitan in 2014, I lectured in European and International Studies at King’s College London, where I completed my PhD in 2013.

I co-created the Critical Theory in Hard Times network, which organised workshops on Decolonising Critical Thought (2021) and Racial Capitalism and Anti-Racist Futures (2023).

  More

Less

Robert S. Brown

Adjunct Professor, Faculty of Education and in Critical Disability Studies, York University, Canada
Dr. Robert Brown has worked in applied research for over thirty-five years, in media research, market research, and education research. After a master’s in Communication Studies at the University of Windsor, he completed his doctorate in education at the University of Toronto. A Past President of the Association of Educational Researchers of Ontario, Robert retired from the Toronto District School Board's Research and Development department in August. He is Adjunct Professor at York University, in the Faculty of Education and in Critical Disability Studies. His areas of study include the time structures of schools, postsecondary student pathways; longitudinal tracking studies; and socio-economic and demographic patterns. He has authored or co-authored works in a number of fields including education, psychology, sociology, medicine, and economics.

  More

Less

Roberta Angioi, PhD

Postdoctoral Researcher in Analytical Chemistry, Dublin City University
My first encounter with research was during my final project in my MSc in Pharmaceutical Chemistry and Technology in my home country, Italy. An Erasmus+ grant allowed me to carry out most of my project abroad, at the Wroclaw Medical University (Poland). Curiosity (and another Erasmus!) led me to the University of Split (Croatia) where I gained more hands-on research experience with different analytical techniques to study plant and food samples. After my degree, I worked as a pharmacist for some time, but I was missing the thrills and challenges of research. When I was awarded the Irish Research Council Postgraduate Research Scholarship in 2019, I was delighted to join Dublin City University to start my PhD with Prof. Blánaid White and Dr. Aoife Morrin. My project aimed at developing a multidisciplinary method to characterise honey and its potential biomedical applications using volatile markers. I am currently a postdoctoral researcher in Dr. Aoife Morrin’s laboratory with Insight (SFI) at DCU, working on bacterial signature Volatile Organic Compounds for wound infection diagnostics.

  More

Less

Roberta Anversa

The University of Melbourne
Dr Roberta Anversa is a Research Associate at The Florey Institute and her research explores novel treatments for alcohol and nicotine addiction. Roberta has an undergraduate degree with Honors in Biotechnology and a PhD in Neuroscience from the University of Melbourne.

  More

Less

Roberta Attanasio

Associate Professor of Biology, Georgia State University, Georgia State University

Research scientist in immunology and environmental toxicology; instructor of immunology, environmental health, and sustainability-related courses; instructor of women leadership courses, with emphasis on leadership in the sciences.

  More

Less

Roberta Davidson

PhD student in Genetic Anthropology, University of Adelaide

  More

Less

Roberta Garrett

Senior Lecturer in Literature and Cultural Studies, University of East London
Dr Roberta Garrett is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Arts and Creative Industries at the University of East London. She is author of Post-Modern Chick-Flicks: The Return of the Woman's Film (2008) co-editor of We Need to Talk About Family: Essays in Neoliberalism, The Family and Popular Culture (2016) and author of Writing the Modern Family: Contemporary Literature, Motherhood and Neoliberalism (2021). She is currently co-editing a book of essays on Rachel Cusk. She has also published numerous articles and book chapters on contemporary film and literature and has a forthcoming article in Feminist Media Studies on domestic abuse on screen.

  More

Less

Roberto Nisticò

Associate Professor of Economics, University of Naples Federico II
Roberto Nisticò is Associate Professor of Economics at the University of Naples Federico II and is also affiliated with CSEF and IZA. He holds a PhD in Economics from the University of Essex. His research focuses on Development Economics, Labor Economics and Political Economics.

  More

Less

Roberto J. González

Professor of Anthropology, San José State University
Roberto J. González is a cultural anthropologist who specializes in the anthropology of science and technology, militarization, environmental anthropology, and the history of anthropological thought. He has written several books including "Zapotec Science: Farming and Food in the Northern Sierra of Oaxaca" (2001), "American Counterinsurgency: Human Science and the Human Terrain" (2009), "Militarizing Culture: Essays on the Warfare State" (2010), "Militarization: A Reader" (co-edited, 2019), "Connected: How a Mexican Village Built Its Own Cell Phone Network" (2020), and "War Virtually: The Quest to Automate Conflict, Militarize Date, and Predict the Future" (2022).

  More

Less

Robin Banks

PhD Candidate and University Associate, University of Tasmania
I am a human rights lawyer with particular expertise in discrimination law. I have practised as a lawyer and held the statutory appointment of Anti Discrimination Commissioner under the Anti-Discrimination Act 1998 (Tas) (2010-17). I am currently a PhD candidate at the University of Tasmania researching potential reforms to discrimination laws drawing from social science research on discrimination, prejudice and stigma.

  More

Less

Robin Chataut

Assistant Professor of Cybersecurity and Computer Science, Quinnipiac University
Dr. Robin Chataut is an assistant professor of Cybersecurity and Computer Science at the School of Computing and Engineering at Quinnipiac University. He earned his Ph.D. in Computer Science and Engineering from the University of North Texas and his undergraduate degree in Electronics and Communication Engineering from Tribhuvan University. Prior to his academic career, he worked in the software industry as a software developer.

Dr. Chataut's research interests lie in the areas of wireless communication, cybersecurity, AI, machine learning, and advanced technologies such as 5G, Beyond 5G, and 6G networks. His expertise also spans network security, smart cities, vehicular networks, and the Internet of Things. His significant contributions to the field are evidenced by his design, implementation, and optimization of complex algorithms and systems architecture for next-generation networks. He has authored several research articles over the past few years and has been a dynamic presence at numerous international conferences and seminars.

Beyond his research and academic commitments, Dr. Robin remains an active participant in the academic community. He serves in multiple international scientific journals and conferences, contributing significantly to the advancement of his fields of expertise.

  More

Less

Robin Cohen

Robin Cohen is Professor Emeritus of Development Studies, University of Oxford. Prior to his Oxford appointment in 2007, he was Professor of Sociology at the University of Warwick. He also held appointments at the Universities of Ibadan, Birmingham, Cape Town and the West Indies and short-term positions at Stanford, Toronto and Berkeley. He was editor of the Routledge series on Global diasporas and of the Cambridge survey of world migration.

His books on migration include The new helots: migrants in the international division of labour (1987, 1993, 2003), Contested domains: debates in international labour studies (1991), Frontiers of identity (1994), Global diasporas: an introduction (1997, rev. 2008), Migration and its enemies (2006) and Encountering difference (2016). He directed the International Migration Institute, part of the Oxford Martin School (2009–11), and was principal investigator on the Oxford Diasporas Programme, covering 11 projects, funded by the Leverhulme Trust (2011–5).

  More

Less

Robin Dodson

Adjunct Assistant Professor of Environmental Health, Boston University
Robin Dodson is a research scientist with expertise in exposure assessment, particularly in the indoor environment. Her research focuses on three main areas: development of novel exposure measurements for epidemiological and community-based studies, analysis of environmental exposure data with a particular emphasis on semi-volatile organic compounds such as phthalates and flame retardant chemicals, and intervention studies aimed at reducing chemical exposures. Dr. Dodson oversees the Institute’s consumer product exposure research. She was the lead author on a landmark peer-reviewed study on endocrine disrupting and asthma-associated chemicals in more than 200 consumer products. As part of the Centers for Disease Control’s Green Housing study, she is currently investigating exposure in children with asthma to chemicals in consumer products and building materials. She leads Silent Spring’s Healthy Green Campus project, a research effort aimed at making health an integral part of sustainability practices on college campuses.

Dr. Dodson completed her doctorate in environmental health at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. For her graduate work, she designed and conducted an exposure study in the Boston area focusing on residential and personal exposures to volatile organic compounds. She developed models to evaluate the transport of pollutants in the indoor environment and determine the contribution of various microenvironments to personal exposures. In addition, she evaluated methods for using existing residential exposure data to model residential exposures in the general population. As a graduate student, she contributed to two studies focusing on asthma in lower-socioeconomic-status urban residences in the Boston area.

Dr. Dodson is an adjunct assistant professor of environmental health at Boston University School of Public Health and also holds an appointment as a visiting scientist at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. She previously taught biostatistics at Brandeis University for eight years. Prior to her graduate work, Dr. Dodson worked at Menzie-Cura and Associates, where she contributed to both human and ecological risk assessments. In addition to her doctorate, Dr. Dodson holds a bachelor’s in environmental studies from Bates College, where she was inducted into the Phi Beta Kappa Academic Honor Society, and a master’s in environmental science and risk management from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

Dr. Dodson’s interest in studying air pollution began in sixth grade when she first learned about the depleting effects of chlorofluorocarbons on the ozone layer. Today, she has dedicated her career to improving public health through her applied research, and hopes to inspire a new generation of young girls to become “future scientists.”

  More

Less

Robin Eames

History PhD candidate, University of Sydney
Robin Eames is a queercrip historian, poet and PhD candidate living on Gadigal land. They are currently researching 19th century trans history, criminalisation, and medicalisation at the University of Sydney. Their work is currently on display in the State Library of NSW's Amaze Gallery, as part of the Pride (R)Evolution exhibition.

  More

Less

Robin Freeman

Head of Indicators and Assessments Unit, Zoological Society of London
Robin Freeman is the Head of the Indicators and Assessments Unit at ZSL. This unit focuses on understanding the patterns and processes of global biodiversity change. From understanding global population trends through indicators like the Living Planet Index to how these trends respond to pressures and drivers across multiple scales. Together Robin's unit maintains and produces the Living Planet Index which is reported biannually with WWF in the Living Planet Report.

Robin originally conducted his doctoral work in a combination of zoology and machine learning and pattern recognition to investigate the distribution and navigational behaviour of homing pigeons and seabirds. He maintains a strong interest in novel analytical methods to better understand the natural world (including working closely with ZSL's Conservation Technology Unit).

Robin also works very closely with the Centre for Biodiversity and Environment Research (CBER) at UCL and have previously had roles in the Computational Ecology group at Microsoft Research Cambridge with CoMPLEX at UCL and with the Animal Behaviour group at Oxford University.

  More

Less

Robin Gregory

Adjunct Professor, Institute for Resources, Environment and Sustainability, University of British Columbia
Robin leads research projects and workshops for Canadian and US government agencies, First Nations, and Industry on improving decision-making skills, addressing difficult tradeoffs, and meaningfully involving citizens in public policy decisions.

  More

Less

Robin Gurwitch

Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University
Dr. Robin Gurwitch, a professor in the Duke University Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and the Center for Child and Family Health, is a recognized expert in understanding and supporting children in the aftermath of trauma and disasters. She received her doctorate in Clinical/Medical Psychology from the University of Alabama at Birmingham, completed her internship in Pediatric Psychology at Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke’s Medical Center in Chicago and completed a fellowship in Child and Adolescent Psychology at the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston.

Since the Oklahoma City bombing in 1995, Dr. Gurwitch has focused much of her clinical work, training and research on improving the outcomes and increasing resilience in children who have experienced trauma or crisis events, including terrorism, natural disasters and stressors related to military deployment. She has served on state and national committees and task forces including the National Commission on Children and Disasters Subcommittee on Human Services Recovery and served as a subject-matter expert in the area of at-risk populations for the Disaster Mental Health Subcommittee of the National Bio-Defense Science Board for the Pediatric Preparedness and Response in Public Health Emergencies and Disasters for the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response (DHHS/ASPR). She is a member of the American Psychological Association’s Disaster Response Network and provides expertise on children and disasters/terrorism for the Substance Abuse Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). She was a member of the inaugural HHS National Advisory Committee on Children and Disasters.

A prolific writer and educator, Dr. Gurwitch has co-authored book chapters, scientific journal articles and public education materials on the topics of trauma, resilience, psychological first aid, terrorism, disasters and preparedness. She authored a trauma treatment manual for use following disasters for children and adolescents. Dr. Gurwitch regularly presents on topics related to her specialty area at regional, national and international conferences. An active volunteer of the American Red Cross, she worked with the American Red Cross to develop materials related to terrorism and disaster for use in disaster mental health training courses and for use in schools.

A caring clinician, Dr. Gurwitch has been involved in direct care following national and international disasters. She has been an active member of the National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN) since it began in 2001. She currently is the Co-PI for the NCTSN grant, NEW DAY (Network for Enhancing Wellness in Disaster Affected Youth. Dr. Gurwitch serves as a Senior Advisor for the National Center of Child Traumatic Stress' Terrorism and Disaster Program of the NCTSN.

Dr. Gurwitch also serves as the Director of the PCIT & CARE Training Program at the Center for Child & Family Health. She is one of only 22 Global Trainers in Parent Child Interaction Therapy, certified by PCIT International. She has led the national efforts for PCIT adaptations for military families and for PCIT with children who have experienced trauma. She is a co-developer of CARE (Child Adult Relationship Enhancement), again leading efforts for military and classroom adaptations. She has published and presented extensively across the United States and Internationally on issues related to PCIT & CARE.

  More

Less

Robin Jeffrey

Professor Robin Jeffrey has published, with his colleague Assa Doron, The Great Indian Phone Book (London: C. Hurst/New York: Harvard University Press, 2013). The book is published in India by Hachette under the title of Cell Phone Nation. It was launched in New Delhi on 18 February 2013 by Mrinal Pande, chair of Prasar Bharati, India's equivalent of the BBC. The book analyzes the expansion of mobile telephone and its implications for society, politics and economics.

Professor Jeffrey is a co-editor of "Being Muslim in South Asia," a collection under contract to Oxford University Press to be published in 2013, and a co-editor of "Mughals and Mandarins," studies of the Chinese and Indian media by analysts and practitioners.

His long-term work focuses on a book called Slices of India, a history of India in the second half of the 20th century based around the years of the great Kumbh Mela in Allahabad.

Professor Jeffrey has written about Kerala, Punjab and Indian media. A third edition of India’s Newspaper Revolution was published in 2010.

He first lived in India as a school teacher in Chandigarh from 1967 to 1969 and has lived for six years in India between 1967 and 2010. He has published a number of books and contributes regularly to policy papers, reports and journals.

Professor Jeffrey completed a doctorate in Indian history at Sussex University in the United Kingdom in 1973. He taught for 25 years in the Politics Program at La Trobe University in Melbourne, and worked twice at the Australian National University in Canberra.

  More

Less

Robin Lamboll

Research Fellow in Atmospheric Science, Imperial College London
Robin Lamboll researches what humans emit into our atmosphere, what effects it will have on us and what we can do about it.

Robin mostly works on open-source software and data analysis. Examples include calculating how much CO2 was can emit before the earth warms more than the Paris Agreement states; analysing relationships between known or projected emissions to infer unknown emissions, and the impact of COVID-19 on human emissions.

Robin completed a PhD in the physics of solar cells at the University of Cambridge, modelling the behaviour of new designs of solar cells, and has an MSci in Natural Sciences from Cambridge. Robin has previously worked as a quantitative consultant and successfully represented the UK in multiple international poetry slams.

  More

Less

Robin Milner-Gulland

Emeritus Professor of Russian, University of Sussex
Robin Milner-Gulland is Emeritus Professor of Russian and East European Studies at the University of Sussex, and an eminent translator, author and editor of works on Russian topics. He is the author of Cultural Atlas of Russia and the Former Soviet Union (2nd edn, 2002), The Russians: The Peoples of Europe (1997) and Patterns of Russia: History, Culture, Spaces (Reaktion, 2020), and translator of Icon and Devotion (Reaktion, 2002).

  More

Less

Robin Morrison

Postdoctoral Fellow in Animal Behavior, University of Exeter
I am a behavioural ecologist studying the evolution of social behaviour. My research is on great ape social behaviour with a particular focus on mountain gorillas and western lowland gorillas. I use long-term data and camera trapping to investigate gorilla society, modelling relationships within and between gorilla groups and how this influences their movement patterns.

I am currently based at the Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund‘s Karisoke Research Center in Rwanda and within Dr Lauren Brent‘s research group at the Centre for Research in Animal Behaviour at the University of Exeter. Starting in June 2023 I will be an Ambizione Fellow in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Zurich. I completed my PhD at the University of Cambridge and conducted field work at Mbeli Bai, Nouabale-Ndoki National Park, Republic of Congo and Ngaga Research Site, Odzala National Park, Republic of Congo.

  More

Less

Robin Snape

Associate Researcher, Centre for Ecology and Conservation, University of Exeter
Robin has over 20 years’ experience in marine conservation research. He has delivered on-the-ground marine conservation programmes for almost two decades in the Mediterranean Sea. He is a sea turtle and seabird expert, and has significant experience in reducing by-catch by small-scale fisheries. At Bluedot Associates, his role as Principal Marine Biodiversity Researcher is to provide technical leadership for our marine biodiversity field research programmes, including associated local capacity building. He also uses his expertise to support the design and implementation of positive conservation actions founded in long-term proven experience on-the-ground.

  More

Less

Robin Kundis Craig

Robert C. Packard Trustee Chair in Law, University of Southern California
Robin Craig specializes in all things water, including the relationships between climate change and water; the water-energy-food nexus; the Clean Water Act; the intersection of water issues and land issues; ocean and coastal law; marine biodiversity and marine protected areas; water law; ecological resilience and the law; climate change adaptation, and the relationships between environmental law and public health. She is the author, co-author, or editor of 12 books, including Re-Envisioning the Anthropocene Ocean (University of Utah Press, forthcoming, with Jeffrey M. McCarthy); The End of Sustainability (Kansas University Press 2017, with Melinda Harm Benson); Contemporary Issues in Climate Change Law and Policy (Environmental Law Institute 2016, with Stephen Miller); Comparative Ocean Governance: Place- Based Protections in an Era of Climate Change (Edward Elgar 2012); and The Clean Water Act and the Constitution (Environmental Law Institute 2nd Ed. 2009), as well as textbooks for environmental law, water law, and toxic torts. She has also written more than 100 law review articles and book chapters in both legal and scientific publications.

  More

Less

Robin M. Daly

Professor of Exercise and Ageing, Institute for Physical Activity and Nutrition, Deakin University, Deakin University
Professor Robin Daly (PhD, FSMA) holds the position of Chair in Exercise and Ageing within the Institute for Physical Activity and Nutrition (IPAN) at Deakin University. He also co-leads the Lifestyle, Health and Disease domain within IPAN.

Professor Daly is recognised internationally for his research into understanding how exercise and nutritional approaches can prevent and manage chronic diseases such as osteoporosis, sarcopenia (muscle loss), falls, type 2 diabetes, certain cancers and cognitive related disorders. His work has led to the dissemination of evidence‐based exercise programs to optimise musculoskeletal health and function and manage type 2 diabetes in older adults, including the Osteo‐cise: Strong Bones for Life osteoporosis prevention exercise program. His also has a special interest in the use of health technology as an approach to remotely monitor and deliver evidence-based exercise programs to older adults.

He has contributed to national and international clinical guidelines in the area of exercise, calcium, vitamin D and protein for osteoporosis and sarcopenia, and is passionate about educating the medical community about exercise as an essential form of medicine. He is currently President of the Australian and New Zealand Society for Sarcopenia and Frailty Research (ANZSSFR), council member of the Australian and New Zealand Bone and Mineral Society (ANZBMS), a member of the medical and scientific committee of Osteoporosis Australia, a board member of Active Geelong and a Fellow of Sports Medicine Australia.

  More

Less

  241 242 243 244 245 246 247 248 249 250   
  • Market Data
Close

Welcome to EconoTimes

Sign up for daily updates for the most important
stories unfolding in the global economy.