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We gave palliative care patients VR therapy. More than 50% said it helped reduce pain and depression symptoms

By Tobias Loetscher Et Al

People in palliative care are dealing with serious, non-curable illness. Every day can be filled with severe physical, psychological and emotional pain. Palliative care staff work hard to help make patients as...

Sporting change: How an elite swim club in Western Canada is addressing bullying

By Julie Booke

While most of the news coverage about maltreatment in sport is focused on sexual abuse, a lesser-discussed, but still prevalent and damaging aspect, is bullying. Bullying is one of the leading causes of sport dropout....

Universities should respond to cuts and corporate influence with co-operative governance

By Michelle Stack Et Al

It doesnt take much to see that todays higher education system needs a restart. Colleges and universities across Canada face varying degrees of financial crisis and interference in research by corporations and governments....

Western leaders threaten to undermine Navalny’s legacy in Russia

By James Horncastle Et Al

The recent death of Alexei Navalny brought immediate condemnations from world leaders, with the American president immediately pointing the finger of blame at Vladimir Putin. One cannot say with certainty the Russian...

How global warming is reshaping winter life in Canada

By H. Damon Matthews Et Al

As we begin to emerge out of yet another mild winter, Canadians are once again being reminded of just how acutely global warming has changed Canadas winter climate. The impacts of this mild winter were felt across the...

Some truths are self-evident: Joe Biden is too old. But who could possibly replace him?

By Emma Shortis

It is possible, in politics as in life, for several things to be true at once. It is true that Donald Trump and his plans for a second presidential administration represent an existential threat to American...

What is Sora? A new generative AI tool could transform video production and amplify disinformation risks

By Vahid Vahidinasab

Late last week, OpenAI announced a new generative AI system named Sora, which produces short videos from text prompts. While Sora is not yet available to the public, the high quality of the sample outputs published so far...

Who was Robert Badinter, the most important Frenchman you never heard of?

By Sylvie Humbert

At the end of a class on the fundamental principles of law that I was teaching to first-year law students, a group of students approached me and asked: But who is this Robert Badinter you speak of so often? Every time I...

After years of avoiding extradition, Julian Assange’s appeal is likely his last chance. Here’s how it might unfold (and how we got here)

By Holly Cullen

On February 20 and 21, Julian Assange will ask the High Court of England and Wales to reverse a decision from June last year allowing the United Kingdom to extradite him to the United States. There he faces multiple...

The brightest object in the universe is a black hole that eats a star a day

By Christian Wolf

Scientists have no reported evidence of the true conditions in Hell, perhaps because no one has ever returned to tell the tale. Hell has been imagined as a supremely uncomfortable place, hot and hostile to bodily forms of...

How long does back pain last? And how can learning about pain increase the chance of recovery?

By Sarah Wallwork Et Al

Back pain is common. One in thirteen people have it right now and worldwide a staggering 619 million people will have it this year. Chronic pain, of which back pain is the most common, is the worlds most disabling...

New ecosystems, unprecedented climates: more Australian species than ever are struggling to survive

By Frédérik Saltré Et Al

Australia is home to about one in 12 of the worlds species of animals, birds, plants and insects between 600,000 and 700,000 species. More than 80% of Australian plants and mammals and just under 50% of our birds are...

Shame, intimacy, and community: fangirls are mocked, but it is more complex than you might think

By Sascha Samlal

With Taylor Swift pulling in over half-a-million audience members on her Australian tour, weve been thinking a lot about fans. In this series, our academics dive into fan cultures: how they developed, how they operate, and...

Gen Z boys’ attitudes to feminism are more nuanced than negative

By Emily Setty Et Al

Young men are more likely than older men to think that feminism has done more harm than good, according to a new survey, suggesting a backward step in attitudes to gender equality. Young women aged 16-29 are also slightly...

Potassium in our soil is running low, threatening global food security – new study proposes a way out

By Will Brownlie Et Al

Soils around the world are running low on potassium, a key nutrient needed for plants to grow. This ultimately means we may not be able to grow enough food for everyone. But its not too late: we have just published...

Spitting Image at 40: the story of the show is surprisingly influenced by Thatcher

By Hannah Andrews

Spitting Image, first broadcast in February 1984, is famed as an iconoclastic satire of 1980s political and popular culture. Its grotesque puppet caricatures became so well known that they could cement a persons image in...

How modern vendettas compare with blood vengeance in the age of King David

By David Shepherd

This article includes reference to the killing of an Aboriginal Australian. The English language has borrowed an Italian word, vendetta, to refer to a family blood-feud. Thanks in part to Hollywoods long fascination...

Lung cancer: Predicting which patients are at high risk of recurrence to improve outcomes

By Mark Sorin Et Al

Lung cancer is responsible for more deaths than breast, colon and prostate cancer combined. With advancements in lung cancer screening, it is expected that more patients will be diagnosed at earlier stages, enabling...

‘Maestro’ shows the enduring power of Gustav Mahler through Leonard Bernstein’s passion

By Aidan McGartland

Bradley Coopers Oscar-nominated Maestro focuses on the man considered the first great American conductor, Leonard Bernstein, who composed such diverse works as West Side Story and Candide. Alongside Todd Fields...

Why does a leap year have 366 days?

By Bhagya Subrayan

You may be used to hearing that it takes the Earth 365 days to make a full lap, but that journey actually lasts about 365 and a quarter days. Leap years help to keep the 12-month calendar matched up with Earths movement...

FAFSA website meltdown: How to avoid additional frustration with financial aid applications

By Dawn Medley

When Congress passed the FAFSA Simplification Act in 2020, it was touted as making it easier for more families to access the government funding they need to send their children to college. But as recent events have shown,...

Nervous Conditions: on translating one of Zimbabwe’s most famous novels into Shona

By Tinashe Mushakavanhu

The publishing journey of Zimbabwean writer and film-maker Tsitsi Dangarembgas Nervous Conditions wasnt easy. Yet the novel is today considered by many as one of Africas 100 best books of the 20th century and is studied at...

Zombie deer disease is spreading and scientists are concerned that it could jump to humans

By Samuel J. White Et Al

In the tranquil expanses of North Americas woodlands and grasslands, a silent but concerning phenomenon is unfolding: chronic wasting disease (CWD). The condition, often dubbed zombie deer disease, is stealthily spreading...

Five reasons why Trump’s Republican opponents were never going to beat him

By Thomas Gift

Donald Trumps inexorable march to the 2024 Republican presidential nomination has sparked plenty of second-guessing. What could his opponents, including former South Carolina governor Nikki Haley and Florida governor Ron...

What bodily secretions like blood, wax and tears can tell us about our health

By Dan Baumgardt

Dry scalp? Blocked ears? Crusted eyes? Our bodies produce many different unusual, sometimes repellent secretions, and their function doesnt always seem entirely clear. But each has their own important role, which often...

What’s behind the collapse in the price of nickel and how can the industry survive?

By Mohan Yellishetty

Australias nickel industry has been granted access to billions of dollars in federal funding as well as relief from royalty payments after a collapse in the global price of nickel that threatens thousands of jobs. On...

‘The future has a way of finding you’: Georgia Blain’s haunting final stories reveal the fragile moments that shape us

By Camilla Nelson

I first met Georgia Blain at The Basement. This was back in the 1990s, when the iconic underground jazz venue near Sydneys Circular Quay still drew a vibrant, edgy crowd. We were young, in our late 20s, and had been...

From Harry Potter to Taylor Swift: how millennial women grew up with fandoms, and became a force

By Emily Baulch

With Taylor Swift pulling in over half-a-million audience members on her Australian tour, weve been thinking a lot about fans. In this series, our academics dive into fan cultures: how they developed, how they operate, and...

Donald Trump faces half a billion dollars of debt and several court cases. But that may not stop him from becoming president again

By Emma Shortis

The verdicts keep coming. On Friday US time, the three-month hearing focused on Donald Trumps business dealings in New York came to an end. Trump was ordered to pay back more than $US350 million (A$537 million), plus...

Is Russia looking to put nukes in space?

By Spenser A. Warren

Fresh U.S. intelligence circulating in Congress reportedly indicates that Russia is developing an anti-satellite weapon in space with a nuclear component. News reports speculating about what the weapon could be abounded...

Alexei Navalny: reported death of Putin’s most prominent opponent spells the end of politics in Russia

By Alexander Titov

Reports of the death of Russias most famous opposition leader, Alexei Navalny, in an Arctic prison camp are shocking, but not entirely unexpected. It draws a line under Russias political development over the past two...

State-owned energy companies are among the world’s most polluting – putting a price on carbon could help

By Anna Grosman Et Al

Existing measures to cajole companies to decarbonise, with subsidies for renewable energy and carbon taxes, have failed to prevent global emissions rising. Does state ownership, particularly in the energy sector, make this...

AI has a large and growing carbon footprint, but there are potential solutions on the horizon

By Shirin Dora

Given the huge problem-solving potential of artificial intelligence (AI), it wouldnt be far-fetched to think that AI could also help us in tackling the climate crisis. However, when we consider the energy needs of AI...

Mexico is suing US gun-makers for arming its gangs − and a US court could award billions in damages

By Timothy D. Lytton

The government of Mexico is suing U.S. gun-makers for their role in facilitating cross-border gun trafficking that has supercharged violent crime in Mexico. The lawsuit seeks US$10 billion in damages and a court order...

Cult of the drone: At the two-year mark, UAVs have changed the face of war in Ukraine – but not outcomes

By Paul Lushenko

Unmanned aerial vehicles, or drones, have been central to the war in Ukraine. Some analysts claim that drones have reshaped war, yielding not just tactical-level effects, but shaping operational and strategic outcomes as...

Extraction of raw materials could rise 60% by 2060 – and making mining ‘greener’ won’t stop the damage

By Gareth Dale

The United Nations flagship Global Resources Outlook report is the portrait of a juggernaut. Due to be published later this month by the UNs International Resource Panel, it highlights how global consumption of raw...

US election: how Trump and his followers use offensive humour to make prejudice acceptable

By Nick Butler

Fox News anchor Sean Hannity interviewed Donald Trump in front of a studio audience in Iowa in December 2023. Hannity asked Trump to guarantee he would not abuse his power or seek retribution if he was reelected in 2024....

Drowning in ‘digital debt’? AI assistants can help – but we must use them carefully

By Daswin de Silva

In recent days, the right to disconnect has entered Australias legislative agenda. It refers to employees rights to refuse unreasonable after-hours contact from their employer. In a work landscape where employees are...

Research espionage is a real threat – but a drastic crackdown could stifle vital international collaboration

By James Laurenceson

Australias research institutions are targets for nefarious actors, from China and elsewhere. The Australian Security Intelligence Organisation (ASIO) has publicly tabled an awareness of various attempts to compromise the...

Why prices are so high – 8 ways retail pricing algorithms gouge consumers

By David Tuffley

The just-released report of the inquiry into price gouging and unfair pricing conducted by Allan Fels for the Australian Council of Trades Unions does more than identify the likely offenders. It finds the biggest are...

Ukraine recap: prospect of renewed US funding a boost for beleaguered Zelensky

By Jonathan Este

Its appropriate, a fortnight out from the second anniversary of the full-scale Russian invasion, to look back and see what the mood was this time last year as we marked the end of the first year of all-out war in Ukraine....

The collapse of The Body Shop shows that ‘ethical’ branding is not a free pass to commercial success

By Kokho Jason Sit

The Body Shop has become the latest casualty of the British high street. The familiar sight (and distinctive smell) of its stores is under threat as the UK arm of the business goes into administration. A success story...

Vladimir Putin’s history war where truth is the first casualty

By Nick Mayhew

The Kremlins decision to sanction several UK historians for their allegedly erroneous coverage of Russian history shows the extent to which Vladimir Putins regime is doubling down on its view of Ukraine as historically...

Disinformation threatens global elections – here’s how to fight back

By Sander van der Linden Et Al

With over half the worlds population heading to the polls in 2024, disinformation season is upon us and the warnings are dire. The World Economic Forum declared misinformation a top societal threat over the next two years...

Who will be picked for vice president? Let’s discuss who’s qualified for the job

By Christopher Devine

The November presidential election might seem far away, but its time for the veepstakes already. You know, that favorite game of pundits, politicos and political junkies who, every four years, obsess over the presidential...

Five reasons to heat your home using infrared fabric

By Michael Siebert

Imagine heating your home from the ceiling, not from underfloor heating or radiators. Once installed like wallpaper, hi-tech infrared fabric emits heat in a similar way to the suns rays. This could be a logical way to add...

School absence rates have rocketed – the whole educational experience needs to change

By Sue Roffey

More than 140,000 pupils in the UK are absent from from school more than 50% of the time: more than double the number from before the pandemic. Not being in school matters and not only because pupils miss out on...

Tasmania is going to an early election. Will the country’s last Liberal state be no more?

By Richard Eccleston Et Al

After months of speculation about an early election and a battle to keep minority government alive, Tasmanian Premier Jeremy Rockliff Australias last remaining Liberal Premier has called an election for March 23, three...

‘Analog uncanny’: how this weird and experimental side of TikTok is forging the future of horror

By Jessica Balanzategui

Director Kyle Edward Balls feature film debut, Skinamarink, achieved unexpected commercial success last year after going viral on TikTok. Hailed by some critics as the best horror film of 2023, or even the scariest of...

Doxing or in the public interest? Free speech, ‘cancelling’ and the ethics of the Jewish creatives’ WhatsApp group leak

By Hugh Breakey

The recent release of a leaked transcript of a private WhatsApp group for Jewish writers, artists, musicians and academics has stirred a controversy that has led to threats of violence, a family in hiding, and the...

Africa’s debt crisis needs a bold new approach

It hasnt been easy for African states to finance their developmental and environmental policy objectives over the past few years. Recent events suggest that the situation may be improving. For the first time in two...

Mercedes-Benz Forecasts Lower Returns Amid Global Uncertainties

10:16 AM| Business

Mercedes-Benz anticipates decreased returns on sales from its cars and vans division this year. This is due to heightened uncertainty driven by conflicts in the Middle East and Ukraine and tensions between China and the...

Hyundai Motor and Kia Achieve Record 1.08 Million Car Production in India

10:15 AM| Business

Hyundai Motor Groups car manufacturing plants in India achieved a milestone last year by surpassing the 1 million unit mark for the second consecutive year. Industry data revealed that the output reached a record 1.08...

Nvidia Reports Impressive Financial Results and Projects Continued Growth

05:32 AM| Business Technology

Nvidia Corp., known for its graphics chips used in artificial intelligence applications, has experienced a significant surge in value due to the high demand for its products. The company recently revealed its latest...

Top Stories

Future of Coal Series

Thermoelectric technologies can help power a zero-carbon future

By Chun-wan Timothy Lo - 06:25 AM| Insights & Views Technology

Thermometers are an under-appreciated marvel of human ingenuity built upon an understanding of relatively simple physical principles. Mercury and alcohol thermometers rely on the volume of liquids growing or shrinking in...

Dating apps are accused of being ‘addictive’. What makes us keep swiping?

By Dr Anastasia Hronis - 01:23 AM| Insights & Views Life

A class-action lawsuit filed in the United States against Match Group the parent company of dating apps Tinder, Hinge and The League is making headlines around the world. The claimants accuse Match of having a...

OpenAI’s new generative tool Sora could revolutionize marketing and content creation

By Omar H. Fares - 06:26 AM| Insights & Views Technology

OpenAIs new generative Sora tool has sparked lively technology discussions over the past week, generating both enthusiasm and concern among fans and critics. Sora is a text-to-video model that significantly advances the...

ADHD drug shortages: what to expect if you take Vyvanse and can’t access your usual dose

By Alison Poulton - 06:27 AM| Insights & Views Health

Imagine you or your child has attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and after several weeks, or even months, youve found a dose of medication youre happy with. The problems you previously experienced with...

Capital gains: Sunak and Starmer’s tax bills show how the system benefits the rich

By Arun Advani Et Al - 10:56 AM| Insights & Views Politics

Rishi Sunak paid over 500,000 in UK taxes last year, recent documents published by the government revealed. As well as displaying a considerable contribution to the nations coffers, the details of the prime ministers...

Global Geopolitics Series

Russia’s space weapon: anti-satellite systems are indiscriminate, posing a risk to everyone’s spacecraft

By Matthew Powell Et Al - 11:06 AM| Insights & Views

In a week where national security has taken centre stage in Washington, the White House confirmed on Thursday that it had evidence that Russia was developing a space-based nuclear anti satellite weapon. John Kirby, the...

Econotimes Series

Economy

China’s doom loop: a dramatically smaller (and older) population could create a devastating global slowdown

China has announced that in 2023 its population declined from 1.4118 to 1.4097 billion people. Forecasting by the UN suggests Chinas population will dip to 1.313 billion by 2050 and then down to about 800 million by 2100....

The private sector housing experiment has failed: Ottawa must now step up on social housing

Politicians of all stripes say that housing affordability is a top priority. But few are saying much about social housing the kind thats needed for low-income households in greatest need of affordable rental...

Wholesale power prices are falling fast – but consumers will have to wait for relief. Here’s why

Wholesale power prices are falling steeply in Australia, following two years of surging prices after the Ukraine war triggered an energy crisis. New data shows annualised spot prices for power in Australias main grid fell...

Mortgage and inflation pain to ease, but only slowly: how 31 top economists see 2024

A panel of 31 leading economists assembled by The Conversation sees no cut in interest rates before the middle of this year, and only a slight cut by December, enough to trim just $55 per month off the cost of servicing a...

South Africa’s military is expected to do more than ever with tighter budgets: how the force has declined over 30 years

The South African National Defence Force marks 30 years this year, having been established on 27 April 1994. Its as old as the countrys constitutional democracy, the result of a negotiated political settlement that ended...

Politics

200 million voters, 820,000 polling stations and 10,000 candidates: Indonesia’s massive election, by the numbers

Indonesians are going to the polls to elect a new president today. There are three candidates running, alongside their vice presidential candidates. According to opinion polls, the favourite is Prabowo Subianto, leader...

How Muslim teachings support political dynasties in Indonesia

President Joko Jokowi Widodo is the latest high-profile political figure in Indonesia to attempt to build a political dynasty, loosely defined as a concentration of political power involving family members. Jokowis...

Russia’s next election is likely to put Putin in power for longer than anyone since Peter the Great

Presidential elections will be held in Russia in March. It is inevitable that the incumbent president, Vladimir Putin, will win. Putin has been in power (whether as president or as prime minister) since 2000. If he wins...

Rwanda deal: why the media should focus more on the policy and less on the politics of immigration

Heading into an election year, the governments handling of migration continues to dominate headlines. Much of the coverage has been about the plan to send those who enter the UK without legal paperwork to Rwanda. This...

Biden’s ‘hard look’ at liquefied natural gas exports raises a critical question: How does natural gas fit with US climate goals?

The Biden administration has frozen pending decisions on permit applications to export liquefied natural gas, or LNG, to countries other than U.S. free trade partners. During this pause, which will last for up to 15...

Science

The brain is the most complicated object in the universe. This is the story of scientists’ quest to decode it – and read people’s minds

In the middle of 2023, a study conducted by the HuthLab at the University of Texas sent shockwaves through the realms of neuroscience and technology. For the first time, the thoughts and impressions of people unable to...

Synthetic human embryos let researchers study early development while sidestepping ethical and logistical hurdles

Embryonic development, also known as embryogenesis, is a cornerstone in understanding the origins of life. But studying this marvel of intricate and layered biological processes in people faces considerable challenges....

Genetic diseases: How scientists are working to make DNA repair (almost) a piece of cake

I have always been fascinated by genetics, a branch of biology that helps explain everything from the striking resemblance between different members of a family to the fact that strawberry plants are frost-resistant. Its...

Orbital resonance − the striking gravitational dance done by planets with aligning orbits

Planets orbit their parent stars while separated by enormous distances in our solar system, planets are like grains of sand in a region the size of a football field. The time that planets take to orbit their suns have no...

Why now is the time to address humanity’s impact on the moon

Humans have always looked at the sky, using the stars as navigation guides or for spiritual storytelling. Every human civilization has looked to the stars and used celestial movements to measure time and find...

Technology

OpenAI CEO Sam Altman Discusses AI's Future, Debunks $7 Trillion Chip Fab Rumor

Sam Altman, CEO of FDC OpenAI, has generated considerable interest in generative AI; however, he cautioned attendants of Intels Foundry Direct Connect (FDC) event on Wednesday that not all information on the internet is...

Apple Rethinks Foldable Tech, Pauses iPhone Project Amid Display Challenges

Apple is currently deliberating on the design of its first foldable device as the development of the project accelerates, DigiTimes reports. Apple Edges Closer to Foldable Device Debut, Targets High-Quality Design...

LG Electronics to Debut High-Tech Bathroom Fixtures

LG Electronics Inc. is planning to launch innovative fixtures and appliances for bathrooms. The South Korean electronics giant is set to showcase its new cutting-edge bathroom products this month. LG Electronics is...

Reddit Strikes $60M AI Content Deal with Google Ahead of Anticipated IPO

Social media platform Reddit has reached an agreement with Google and has launched a new portal where its content can be used to train the search engine giants artificial intelligence models, a new report...

Samsung Expands S24 AI Innovations to Galaxy S23 and More with One UI 6.1 Update

Samsung assured us around the time of the Samsung Galaxy S24 launch that One UI 6.1, the software that debuted on those phones, would be available on additional devices. The company is currently providing a schedule for...
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