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Climate holdout Japan drove Australia’s LNG boom. Could the partnership go green?

By Wesley Morgan

Without funding from Japan, many of Australias gas projects wouldnt have gone ahead. Massive public loans from Japanese taxpayers are propping up Australias now-enormous fossil gas industry. Japan is also becoming a major...

Trust hits new low: 45% of people think politicians put party before country

By John Curtice

There is an air of deja vu about this election. Trust and confidence in how Britain is governed is as low as it has ever been just as it was shortly before the last election five years ago. Yet the circumstances that...

Food has a climate problem: Nitrous oxide emissions are accelerating with growing demand for fertilizer and meat – but there are solutions

By Hanqin Tian Et Al

Foods role in climate change has emerged as one of the defining challenges of our time. The journey of a steak, fruit or salad from the vast expanses of agricultural lands to the plates on our tables leaves a significant...

How game worlds are helping health-care workers practise compassionate clinical responses

By David Chandross Et Al

A game world is a fantasy universe based on a story and a theme. In learning contexts, such as in schools or professional continuing education, game worlds permit us to teach complex subjects in an engaging way by...

Some online platforms are starting to measure ‘student engagement’ at school. Here’s what you need to know

By Chris Zomer

There is increasing concern children are less focused in school. This is often blamed on smartphones and social media. At the same time, there is significant pressure on schools to deliver academic results, with...

No, AI doesn’t mean human-made music is doomed. Here’s why

By Alexander Crooke

Recently we have seen the launch of artificial intelligence programs such as SOUNDRAW and Loudly that can create musical compositions in the style of almost any artist. Were also seeing big stars use AI in their own...

Why spending time and money creating TikToks probably won’t pay off for Labour and Conservatives

By Steven Buckley

In a few short years, TikTok has moved from being an app for teens doing dance routines in their bedroom to a key part of political campaigning. Both Labour and the Conservatives are on the app (with 191,000 and 58,000...

No matter who wins, both Biden and Trump can likely agree on one thing: doing less in the Middle East

By Jared Mondschein

Prior to the October 7 Hamas attacks on Israel, US national security adviser Jake Sullivan posited that the Middle East had been quieter than it has been for decades. This is obviously no longer the case. On the...

Age verification for pornography access? Our research shows it fails on many levels

By Zahra Stardust Et Al

The Australian government has announced a A$6.5 million trial of age assurance technology to restrict minors access to pornography. Its part of a $1 billion package to address gendered violence. And it now comes alongside...

What’s the difference between Alzheimer’s and dementia?

By Nikki-Anne Wilson

Whats the difference? is a new editorial product that explains the similarities and differences between commonly confused health and medical terms, and why they matter. Changes in thinking and memory as we age can occur...

We have a moral responsibility to help low-income nations restore coral reefs

By Mark Gibbs

The fourth global coral bleaching event is underway. It wont be the last. Even if we reduce the greenhouse gas emissions driving climate change, excess heat will remain in the ocean. I believe high-income nations...

Can the US give cricket a lasting embrace – or will it always be dogged by comparisons with baseball?

By Richard Thomas1

Within a congested sporting summer, we might have already witnessed the most unexpected sporting moment of 2024. In what has been dubbed one of the biggest shocks in cricket history, the ICC Mens T20 World Cup co-hosts USA...

Do unemployment benefits stifle entrepreneurship? It’s complicated

By Daragh O'Leary

Unemployment in the UK rose to 4.3% at the end of March 2024. While this is by no means a worrying level of joblessness for an economy, it is the highest since September 2021, in the second year of the COVID pandemic, when...

2024 European elections: Who are young Europeans voting for?

By Jesús Palomar i Baget

Over the last five European Parliament elections, young peoples participation and preferences have changed significantly in response to various socio-economic, political and cultural factors. Of course, the European Union...

What toilet paper and game shows can teach us about the spread of epidemics

By Matthew Ryan2 Et Al

How can we explain and predict human behaviour? Are mathematics and probability up to the task, or are humans too complex and irrational? Often, peoples actions take us by surprise, particularly when they seem...

The UK’s nature restoration plans have some big holes – here’s how to fill them

By Eleanor Jane Milner-Gulland Et Al

Have you heard anything about nature as a political priority in the upcoming UK general election? We havent. And as biodiversity researchers, that troubles us. The UK is already one of the worlds most nature-depleted...

Blade Runner soundtrack at 30: how Vangelis used electronic music to explore what it means to be human

By Alison Cole

In June 1994 the late composer Evangelos Odysseas Papathanassiou better known as Vangelis released his soundtrack for the 1982 film Blade Runner. It would go on to become emblematic of his skills, with only a handful of...

A shocking 79% of female scientists have negative experiences during polar field work

By Rebecca Duncan

Every day, women are working on frontier science in Earths unforgiving polar environments. Our study, published today in PLOS Climate, investigated what their experiences are actually like. Fieldwork in the Arctic and...

Yes, carbon capture and storage is controversial – but it’s going to be crucial

By Tianyi Ma

Renewable energy sources such as wind and solar are vital tools to help us make cuts to the 36 billion tonnes of greenhouse gases we emit each year. But renewables alone cant get us to net zero. Sectors such as cement,...

Hydration is really important for learning. How much do kids need to drink?

By Talitha Best

Last month, Ballarat Clarendon College began a trial to ban water bottles in the classroom for students in Years 5 to 9. According to the school, early feedback indicated it had reduced noise and bathroom breaks during...

Iran: meet the men – and women – lining up to contest the early presidential election

By Scott Lucas

The death in a helicopter crash of the Iranian president, Ebrahim Raisi, on May 19 has triggered a presidential election one year earlier than expected. Its a consequential moment in Iranian politics as many believed that...

Does voting help the climate?

By Jack Marley

The worlds biggest election took place in heat so severe it claimed the lives of several poll workers. Nearly one billion people were eligible to vote in the election that returned Narendra Modi to power in India, but...

Lebanon’s Hezbollah is proving to be a serious problem for Israel

By Zainab Younes

Hezbollah intensified its attacks in northern Israel on June 2, firing barrages of rockets over the border that set off massive wildfires. This came two days after the Lebanese armed group revealed that it had downed one...

Spa holidays in France: ‘taking the waters’ with a doctor’s prescription

By Mazarine Wairy Dupuich

From Italy to Germany, Spain to the Balkans, many cultures swear by the use of hot water for its curative properties. France sets itself apart from many European neighbours, however, as doctors can prescribe spa stays,...

The power of belief: How expectations influence workplace well-being interventions

By Mehak Bharti Et Al

In todays fast-paced work environments, the quest for inner peace can feel like an elusive dream. In 2021, 62 per cent of health-care workers reported having burnout, while 70 per cent reported depressive symptoms and 29...

Foreign healthcare volunteers in Africa can harm local relationships – Zambian study

By James Wintrup

Thousands of global health volunteers, most from the United States, travel to Africa every year. These volunteers come from diverse backgrounds and have varying levels of experience. They include surgeons,...

Why India and Pakistan’s T20 cricket showdown in New York is such a big deal

By Umer Hussain Et Al

Americans might be surprised to learn that cricket not baseball, nor football holds the title of the nations first modern team sport. European immigration fueled the sports popularity in the first half of the 19th...

Why American investors are pouring money into European football

By Christina Philippou

Internazionale Milano (Inter Milan) were crowned champions of this years Serie A, the top flight of Italian football, on April 22. A month later, they were back in the news having been taken over by US investment firm...

Trying to save money? Our research suggests paying in cash – while you still can

By Lachlan Schomburgk Et Al

Cash is in crisis. In Australia, its now only used for 16% of in-person transactions, down from about 70% in 2007. The situation is so dire that on Monday, independent federal MP Andrew Gee introduced a private members...

Spare us the talk about a wages explosion. There’s nothing wrong with lifting Australia’s lowest wages in line with inflation

By Peter Martin1

What is it with the Coalition and wages? When, in the final days of the 2022 election campaign, the then opposition leader Anthony Albanese backed an increase in award wages to keep pace with inflation, his opposite...

Mental illness, psychiatric disorder or psychological problem. What should we call mental distress?

By Nick Haslam Et Al

We talk about mental health more than ever, but the language we should use remains a vexed issue. Should we call people who seek help patients, clients or consumers? Should we use person-first expressions such as person...

Groundwater is heating up, threatening life below and above the surface

By Gabriel C Rau Et Al

Under your feet lies the worlds biggest reservoir. Groundwater makes up a whopping 97% of all usable freshwater. Where is it? In the voids between grains and cracks within rocks. We see it when it rises to the surface in...

Worried about sending your baby to daycare? Our research shows they like being in groups

By Ben Bradley Et Al

When parents are starting their babies in daycare, a common concern is whether it is good for little ones to be away from their primary carers for long periods of time. But as our recent book Babies in Groups shows,...

How can busy people also keep fit and healthy? Here’s what the ancient Greeks and Romans did

By Konstantine Panegyres

Many people today worry about how to find time to keep fit and healthy in the midst of their busy lives. Believe it or not, but this was also a problem in ancient times. So, how did ancient people deal with it? A...

The emerald ash borer has arrived in B.C. — what can we do about it?

By Dezene Huber Et Al

The emerald ash borer (EAB) is a deceptively beautiful insect. As the first part of the name implies, the one-centimetre long beetles are an iridescent, metallic green. They have large, dark eyes and some might even call...

By not mining vital minerals, NZ is ‘offshoring its own environmental footprint’ – is that fair?

By Martin Brook

When Resources Minister Shane Jones recently unveiled his draft strategy for mineral mining, it was quickly criticised by the Labour opposition as taking New Zealand backwards. One environmental group even called it a love...

Whose health matters? The diversity deficit in clinical trials

By Sonia Anand

Most people are aware that the process of bringing new medical products to market is rigorous, complex and tightly regulated. Diagnostic tests, therapies and treatments all go through lengthy, expensive trials to make sure...

Modi’s narrow win suggests Indian voters saw through religious rhetoric, opting instead to curtail his political power

By Sumit Ganguly

Indias ruling Bharatiya Janata Party, or BJP, had hoped for a landslide victory in the countrys six-week general election the largest display of democracy, by far, in a year of voting around the world. But with results...

UK cities need greener new builds – and more of them

By Michael Hardman Et Al

Amid the growing local government bankruptcy crisis, as many as half of the local authorities in England and Wales might be forced to cut their green spaces budgets. The situation in Scotland and Northern Ireland is not...

Dangerous chemicals found in teeth-whitening kits bought online

By Albert Leung

UK Trading Standards has recently found that up to 90% of home-use teeth-whitening kits shipped through the mail might be unsafe. It is unlawful in the UK for home-use teeth-whitening kits to contain more than 0.1%...

Documenting the world’s largest prehistoric rock art in South America – new study

By Philip Riris Et Al

We werent the first to lay eyes on the engraving since it was carved into the hillside any number of centuries or millennia ago, not by a long shot. The Venezuelan archaeologist José Maria Cruxent even recorded it...

Iran: president’s death has set hardliners jostling for position to replace ageing supreme leader

By Afshin Shahi

The death of Irans president, Ebrahim Raisi, in a helicopter crash in May plunged Iran into political uncertainly. Raisis death has set off an intense power struggle within the Islamic Republic. Irans consitution...

Indian election: Narendra Modi hasn’t delivered the expected landslide – where the BJP may have gone wrong

By Thankom Arun

Narendra Modi may have led his Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP)-led National Democratic Alliance (NDA) to a historic third term, but the landslide victory that many had expected failed to materialise. With half of the 640...

Local food systems need to prioritize job quality alongside ethical food production

By Stevens Azima

Local food systems are often viewed as alternatives to the global food system to stress their promise of difference. Research supports several benefits associated with local food systems, although not without nuances...

To remain relevant to young Muslims, mosques must become more inclusive spaces for women

By Tammy Gaber

I was widowed at a fairly young age, and as a Muslim woman and single mother it was my responsibility to take my children a son and a daughter to the mosque on Fridays, to find solace and to pray. However, each time I...

Unmarred by Russian spying scandal, Austria’s far-right expected to cruise to victory in European elections

By Benjamin Rojtman-Guiraud

For the Freedom Party of Austria (FP), the weeks are going by like clockwork. The far-right party continues to top the polls. It is expected to clinch a comfortable victory in the European elections on 9 June with almost...

Africa doesn’t have a choice between economic growth and protecting the environment: how they can go hand in hand

By Lite Nartey

Heathrow Airport in the UK currently uses more energy than the entire west African country of Sierra Leone. Despite Africa accounting for less than 4% of all global greenhouse gas emissions, many of its countries face...

Sierra Leone’s bushmeat markets pose serious health hazards – we studied two for six months to find solutions

By Jack Jenkins Et Al

You are walking through the bustling centre of Bo, Sierra Leones third largest city. Following the crowd, you turn off the main road onto a narrower thoroughfare and find yourself in an open-air market. Shelters...

Life on the US-Mexico border is chaotic. An immigration scholar explains why

By William McCorkle

As debate over U.S. immigration policy heats up during the 2024 presidential campaign, separating fact from fiction on the U.S.-Mexico border becomes increasingly difficult. In May 2023, shortly after the end of a...

Rotting sargassum is choking the Caribbean’s white sand beaches, fueling an economic and public health crisis

By Farah Nibbs

The Caribbeans sandy beaches, clear turquoise water and vibrant coral reefs filled with an amazing variety of sea creatures have long been the pride of the islands. The big three sun, sea and sand have made this...

EU elections: far-right parties surge, but less than had been expected

The results of the 2024 European elections have confirmed the surge of far-right parties in EU member states. However, while many recorded significant scores, the wave was not a groundswell, and the shifts vary from...

Investors have bid against each other to buy Australia’s first green bond. Here’s why that’s a great sign

By Gordon Noble1 - 04:20 AM| Economy Investing

You might think government debt is bad, but it actually plays a crucial role in modern finance. Back when he was treasurer, Peter Costello famously declared that April 21 2006 would be known as Australias Debt Free Day....

Top Stories

Super funds are set to use ‘nudges’ to help you make financial decisions. How do they work?

By Fernanda Mata Et Al - 11:28 AM| Investing

Late last year the federal government announced measuresmake it easier for Australians to access financial advice? As part of this, the government wants super funds to use nudges to get members to engage more with their...

Solar farms can eat up farmland – but ‘agrivoltaics’ could mean the best of both worlds for NZ farmers

By Alan Brent Et Al - 11:30 AM| Business

New Zealand plans to commission about eight gigawatts of solar photovoltaic projects more than the maximum power demand of the whole country on a typical winters day by 2028, according to the governments latest...

Migrant Crisis Series

Biden’s immigration order won’t fix problems quickly – 4 things to know about what’s changing

By Jean Lantz Reisz - 11:30 AM| Politics

Immigration is a top issue in the upcoming presidential election and President Joe Bidens new executive order restricting migrants ability to apply for asylum is likely to further elevate the subject in national...

Meet the ‘new consumer’: How shopper behaviour is changing in a post-inflation world

By Omar H. Fares Et Al - 11:31 AM| Economy

After a long anticipated wait, the Bank of Canada has finally decided to cut interest rates by 25 basis points. The decision marks a departure from the series of interest rate hikes that were previously implemented to curb...

Indian election: why Modi may now need to switch his economic ambitions to new businesses and small firms

By Jagannadha Pawan Tamvada - 11:31 AM| Politics

India looks set to return Narendra Modi as prime minister for a third term. But not in the way that he might have wished or expected. Modi had hoped to win 400 of the 543 seats available in the Indian parliament. Yet...

Space Science Series

Welcome to the age of space scepticism – and a growing revolt against elites

By Tony Milligan - 11:32 AM| Business

Over the past decade, a new form of scepticism about human activities in space has emerged. It seems to be based exclusively in the western world, and centred around the idea that increasingly ambitious space plans will...

Econotimes Series

Economy

Net zero is not just good science – it’s also a good deal for ordinary people

As the UK moves into a general election, a misinformed debate over the countrys climate transition and legally binding net zero targets risks further dividing people. Much of this debate in the UK focuses on the cost of...

The UK has a growing food black market – and it’s making the cost of living crisis worse

The UK food sector has faced its fair share of challenges, and issues around supply are not uncommon. In the year to January 2024, overall food prices rose by 7%. To compound this, last year, the UKs Competition and...

Why do we need a Net Zero Economy Authority? And how can it fulfil its promise?

To support its climate agenda, the Albanese government is building new institutions. One of the most important will be the Net Zero Economy Authority. The proposed laws to create this authority are currently before the...

African countries could unlock billions in local and global trade – what’s working and what’s not

Africas share of global trade remains disproportionately small, hovering around 2%-3%. Countries on the continent trade more with the rest of the world than they do among themselves. Africa needs to improve its share of...

Race still divides South Africa – study shows little transformation in new suburbs in country’s economic hub

As South Africa reflects on 30 years of democracy, its important to ask whether its cities have changed for the better when it comes to racial mixing. During apartheid, South Africas residential development was...

Politics

Trump’s lawyers in lawsuits claiming he won in 2020 are getting punished for abusing courts and making unsupported claims and false statements

Over the past four years, U.S. courts and state bar associations have taken action to protect the integrity of the U.S. judicial system by penalizing attorneys who filed meritless lawsuits claiming without evidence that...

Election 2024: polling shows voters don’t believe the tax pledges

The two main parties contesting the UK general election have been unusually cautious on their spending plans, despite urgent calls for more public funding to tackle crises in housing, social care and the...

Wisconsin is a key swing state this year – and has a history of being unpredictable

Voters in Wisconsin now considered a critical swing state ahead of the 2024 presidential election may be among the most unpredictable in the nation. Although former President Barack Obama carried the state in the 2008...

TSMC Weighed Leaving Taiwan Amid China Tensions, Deemed Move Infeasible

TSMC disclosed it had considered relocating its chip factories from Taiwan amid escalating China tensions but decided the move was impractical. TSMCs Relocation Discussions Tensions between Taiwan and China have been...

Mexico: Sheinbaum faces uphill task to buck the trend and curtail spiralling violence

Mexico has reached a political milestone. According to a quick count by the countrys electoral commission, Mexican voters have just elected their first female president. In a society that has long treated its women...

Science

Eye exercises to improve sight – is there any science behind them? An ophthalmologist explains why you shouldn’t buy the hype

You may have seen advertisements claiming to eliminate the need for eyeglasses through vision therapy or vision training basically, eye exercises. These exercises include putting pressure on or palming the eye; eye...

The universe’s biggest explosions made some of the elements we are composed of. But there’s another mystery source out there

After its birth in the Big Bang, the universe consisted mainly of hydrogen and a few helium atoms. These are the lightest elements in the periodic table. More-or-less all elements heavier than helium were produced in the...

Engineering cells to broadcast their behavior can help scientists study their inner workings

Waves are ubiquitous in nature and technology. Whether its the rise and fall of ocean tides or the swinging of a clocks pendulum, the predictable rhythms of waves create a signal that is easy to track and distinguish from...

If an asteroid hit Earth and all the humans died, would the dinosaurs come back?

Many, many years ago dinosaurs roamed the Earth. Six-year-old Aga knows that a meteorite wiped them out… but could another meteorite bring them back? You can read a print version of this story...

Ancient DNA from an extinct native duck reveals how far birds flew to make New Zealand home

Ask a bird lover if they have heard of the extinct giant moa or its ancient predator, Haasts eagle, and the answer will likely be yes. The same cant be said of New Zealands extinct, but equally unique, mergansers a group...

Technology

Trump Advocates for Bitcoin ‘Made in the USA’ After Meeting Mining Industry Heads

After meeting with cryptocurrency mining company leaders, Donald Trump stressed the need for all Bitcoin to be produced in the USA, highlighting its role in energy dominance. Trumps Call for Domestic Bitcoin...

Shiba Inu Burn Rate Jumps 3010%; 232M SHIB Tokens Reduced from Circulation

Shiba Inu (SHIB) token burn rate surged by 3010% on June 12, resulting in 232 million tokens being burned, a notable rise during the market downturn. Unprecedented SHIB Burn Rate Increase The Shiba Inu (SHIB) meme...

Critical Week Ahead: SEC to Comment on Ethereum ETF S-1 Filings

The Ethereum ETF is at a pivotal moment this week as the SEC prepares to respond to S-1 filings, potentially shaping the future of Ethereum-based investment products. Crypto Market Awaits SECs Critical Decision on...

Shiba Inu (SHIB) ETF Petition Surpasses 10,500 Signatures, Gains Momentum

A Change.org petition advocating for a Shiba Inu (SHIB) Exchange-Traded Fund (ETF) has surpassed 10,500 signatures, highlighting strong community support for expanding cryptocurrency investment options. Petition for...

How Apple's Latest Event Disrupted AI-Linked Tokens and Shook the Crypto Market

Apples annual developer event led to a sharp decline in AI-linked cryptocurrencies, highlighting the intricate relationship between traditional technology and the crypto market. Apples ChatGPT Integration Sparks Decline...
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